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1 



i magazine radio ind tv advertisers use 



10 JANUARY 1955 



50< per copy« $ 8 per year 




map shows the tremendou; gulf which separates Omaha's 

leading radio stations audience-wise. 

e "d: Solid line — KOWH share of audience. Broken 
— second station's share.* 

legend: KOWH quarter-hour averages run as high as 
i%, no lower than 30.5%. KOWH leads in 36 of 40 
time quarters. More sets were tuned to KOWH than to 

Data from latest available Hooper "Quarter Hour Averages," 
8 a.m. to 6 p m., Monday through Saturday 



the other stations combined in 18 periods. Latest Hooper: 
(Nov.-Dec.) KOWH, 46.5%, second station, 22.3%. 

This man-made gulf is created by the Mid-Continent for- 
mula: engaging personalities, spinning top tunes, talking 
good sense, handling the news to Omaha's taste. For a 
tour de force, see your travel agent — the H-R man, or talk 
to KOWH General Manager, Virgil Sharpe. 




CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 

President: Todd Storz 



KOWH 



OMAHA 



Represented by 
John Blair & Co. 






■■ 



irleans 
Represented by 
Adam J. Young, Jr. 



KOWI 
Represented by 
H-R, Reps, Inc. 



Key questions from 
admen on the radio-tv 
year ahead 

page 37 



Ford's "This Ole 
House" jingle: a 
radio saga 

page 40 



pa 



Spot radio facts: 
will the "Iron Cur 
in" lift in '55? 




age 42 



Sunbeam Corp.: from 
nothing to $3 million 
on tv in two years 

page 44 

HOW MANY I 



I 



COMMERCIALS? 



age 46 

















"Radio never went 
away": Worth Kramer 
cites radio progress 

page 48 



How radio forced 
distribution for 
cement coating 

page 50 






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30 BOl LER PLAZA. 



IEW YORK, N, Y. 



TV set count 
still under test 



Major agency 
executive shifts 



New spot "Iron Curtain" surrounding activities of big-time spenders in spot 
data due radio (P&G, Colgate, Lever, Swift, General Foods, et al. )' mav be 

lifted this year. Alliance has been formed by Jim Boerst ("Factuary") 
and Duke Rorabaugh ( "Rorabaugh Report on Spot Tv") to publish spot 
radio quarterly report based on data gathered from cross-section of 
stations. Target date: March. Nielsen and Hooper research firms are 
considering addition of spot radio data ("logs" of spot activity and 
frequency, ratings) to local measurement services (story page 42). 

-SR- 
NARTB set circulation plan is still undergoing methodology test. 
Technique for tv coverage and set-count study is being checked by 
Politz in 2 cities with work in one city nearly compl ete. NARTB hopes 
to have methodology study wrapped up before April. Next step: 
"pilot" study of tv coverage, perhaps by mid-1955. Project will be 
turned over to NARTB-organized industry association following 
methodology and pilot studies. 

-SR- 

First of 1955 sees more than usual crop of agency executive changes. 
Earie Ludgin, William Weintraub, Milton Biow — all former presidents 
of agencies bearing their names — e ach became chairman of the board 
1 January. New lineup of presidents: At Ludgin, Vincent R. Bliss; 
at Weintraub, Elkin Kaufman; at Biow (now called Biow, Beirn, Toigo, 
Inc.), F. Kenneth Beirn. Following death of H. W. Newell, president 
of Lennen & Newell, board elected Adolph J. Toigo president. (Biow's 
John Toigo and L&N's Adolph Toigo are cousins.) 

-SR- 
Country and folk music, long popular on radio networks (shows still 
on include CBS* Saturday Night Countr y St y le, NBC's Grand Ole Opr y 
and Dude Ranch , ABC's Ozark Jambor ee) , will get full-hour television 
treatment late this month. ABC TV's Robert M. Kinter has signed 
with Ralph D. Foster, president of RadiOzark, for tv version of 
Ozark Jamb o ree. Pact, reportedly for 5-year period, includes stars 
Red Foley, Jean Shepard, Oklahoma Wranglers. If AT&T can clear 
lines for ABC TV in time, program will debut from Springfield, Mo., 
on 22 Jan., 9:00-10:00 p.m. EST. It replaces Saturday Night Fights, 
dropped by Bayuk cigars. 

-SR- 

Day radio Trend to revised pricing in spot radio continues. Avery-Knodel rep 
costs more firm and KXYZ, Houston, have launched pilot operation which will be 
watched closely by other Avery-Knodel outlets in tv areas. New ap- 
proach, called "Realistic Pricing M ethod," calls for peak spot rates 
to fall between 6:30 a.m. and noon, and between 5:00 and 7:00 p.m. 
Old rate formula has been tossed away; new formula is tied to Pulse 
share-of-audience figures throughout day and not to "total homes 
using radio. " 



ABC TV plans 
folk music show 



SPONSOB, Volume 9. No. 1. 10 Januarj 1955 Published biweekly bs SPONSOR Publications, Tnr Executive, editorial U 

York 17. Trinted at 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore. Md. $8 a year in U.S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 .l.in 1919 at Baltimore postofflrc under Act of 3 Mar. 1879 



EtllMHM TO SPONSORS for 10 January li>5."> 

DTN to invest Recent DTN changes seek to get at heart of net's problem: Failure to 
in programing clear enough stations. Ted Bergmann, managing director told SPONSOR 
cutback in use of cable will free money for development of new pro- 
grams, better production. Teletranscriptions to be used increasingly 
in lieu of cable are simply Du Mont's existing form of kinescoping. 
Present DTN bill for use of cable is $3 million annually. Network 
may be able to save half via Teletranscriptions. 

-SR- 
Knipe heads Following plans of late C. E. Hooper, research firm will be headed 
Hooper firm by James L. Knipe, executive, v. p. Knipe is former sales manager and 
director of Ball Brothers (Mason jars), holds Yale PhD. in economics, 
was hired by "Hoop" over year ago. Other executives in new lineup: 
W. Bruce McEwen, v. p. in charge agency relations; Dorothy Behrens, 
v.p. in charge research; Frank Stisser, in charge station relations. 
Fred H. Kenkel, recently at Nielsen, has rejoined Hooper firm. All 
present services will continue, Hooper firm has told agencies. Firm 
is also discussing re-entering national tv ratings , with emphasis on 
fast service. 

-SR- 
RAB to step up Look for announcement soon of intensified spot radio efforts by RAB. 
spot activity By late spring or early summer Crusade for Spot Radio activities will 
probably be absorbed by RAB. Among them: meetings bringing together 
agency executives and rep salesmen who call on them. Crusade was set 
up 2 years ago to sell spot radio on industrywide basis. 

-SR- 
Tv homes like More than third of New York tv homes use radio and tv at same time 
radio news in diff e rent locat i on s, Advertest study shows. Most of this occurs 
after 5:00 p.m. Over 90% of tv home listeners consider radio im- 
portant source of news; over 87% feel it's key source of music. 

-SR- 
More radios Farm-area radio growth today continues in direction of multi-set 
on farms homes, auto radios annual survey of Iowa radio-tv audience by Dr. 

Forest Whan reveals. Radio home saturation has remained similar over 
past decade but number of homes with 2 or more radios has gone from 
37 .6% to over 50f. Since 1949, percentage of all families owning 
radio-equipped auto has gone from 42% to more than 63%. Study is 17th 
consecutive survey for station WHO, Des Moines. 

-SR- 
Heavy toll of Closing weeks of 1954 took great er toll of key industry figures than 
key figures perhaps any other period. Included in loss to industry were: Horace 
Lohnes (see editorial page 112) ; Lincoln B. Simonds, West Coast 
manager Weed & Co. ; H. W. Newell; C. E. Hooper; L. B. Wilson. 

-SR- 
Ford's out front Ford and Chevrolet, both with dramatic shows on tv, news shows on 

says Ford II radio, also both claim top spot in 1954 sales. Autom ot ive News listed 
Chewy about 10,000 units ahead of Ford as of 20 November — but Henry 
Ford II in New Year's Day telegram to dealers said "complete" sales 
data, available only to 1 November, gave Ford the lead. When intro- 
ducing new models Ford bought 1, 800-station campaign, aired 100,000 
.innouncements for more than $500,000. (For diary of Ford's "This Ole 
House" jingle, see page 40.) 



SPONSOR 




itation i 



n New 



jersey 



covering 82% of the state plus a big bonus 
in New York 



with aud 




which has been firm for the last 5 years 
and is now better than ever 




the answers 



to a New Jersey sales problem call your 
waat man ... he knows this market 



waaf 

970 on your dial 



1020 Broad Street, Newark 1, N. J. Mitchell 2-6400 

575 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. PLaza 5-1331 



10 JANUARY 1955 



advertisers use 




Ire tv commercials getting word-lazy? 

BBDO radio-tv v. p. Art Bellaire fools tv copy is becoming cliche-loaded, gives 
his suggestions on how to socle the fresh word 



37 



40 



42 



II 



ARTICLES 



10 top radio-tv questions for lf>.~i.~i 

What are the leading questions that sponsor and agency executives are asking 
as they look to the New Year? In the first of a two-part article, SPONSOR 
examines tv station rates, tv costs, film outlook, radio commercial impact 



Diary of Ford's "This Ole House" single 

Here's the story of the jingle used in the biggest radio saturation campaign of 
1954 in which Ford launched its new models last fall with more than 100,000 
announcements on over 1,800 stations 



Spot radio sprtnliny: trill the "Iron Curtain"' lift? 

Report on the new plans and proposals of research and rating firms to provide 
dollar figures, ratings of spot radio commercials and qualitative analyses to 
advertisers and agencies 



Sunbeam: front zero to S3 million on ft* iit 2 years 

Virtually unknown among air advertisers a few years ago, the Sunbeam Corp. 
now spends some 50 f f of its $6,000,000 budget on tv. Its video ventures range 
from daytime-magazine shows to lavish spectaculars 



W hat is the audience to your tv commercials? 

What percentage of the viewers of a tv program can recognize one or more 
commercials from that show? A Starch survey for NBC TV shows shows that 9 
of 10 viewers recognize at least one commercial, two-thirds at least two 



"ftoflio never went away" 

WJR, Detroit's, Worth Kramer feels radio has progressed despite these three 
destructive forces: (I) ratings; (2) merchandising; (3) bad business practices 



How rutlio forced distribution for cement routing 

When retailers didn't want to stock Cement Dus-Top, a coating to dust-proof 
basement cement floors, maker McMillan Products Co. decided to sell the con- 
sumer direct via a radio d.j. show. In 3 months, number of dealers rose 400% 



COM I NC 



10 top radio questions for IO.~i.~i: part II 

SPONSOR will look into what the coming year may hold for tv spectaculars, tv 

clearances, use of cut-ins on network tv, changes in radio networks 2 I 'till. 



4<i 



4 It 



50 



Volume 9 Number 1 
10 January 1955 



2 I lau. 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS 1 

NEW & RENEW 1 
AGENCY AD LIBS 

49TH & MADISON 1 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 2 
MR. SPONSOR, Michael Cull. none 3 

P. S. ... 5 

NEW TV FILM SHOWS 5 

NEW TV STATIONS 5 

RADIO RESULTS 6 
AGENCY PROFILE, Curt Peterson 7 

SPONSOR ASKS 7 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 7 

ROUND-UP 8, 

NEWSMAKERS 11 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 11 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard Pla' 

Vice President: Jacob A. Evans 

Editorial Director: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J.Jo*' 

Associate Editor: Evelyn Konrad 

Department Editor: Lila Lee Seaton 

Assistant Editors: Keith Trantow, Al Zamelka 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe Csi< 

Editorial Assistant: Caryl Bindler 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice Pres.-Advg. Director: Robert P. Mendelsc 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coop 

(Western Manager), Homer Griffith (Soutl 

west Manager), Arnold Alpert (Midwest Met 

ager), John A. Kovchok (Production Mel 

ager), Stewart Perry 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Sarz (Su 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Morton < 

Kahn, Minerva Mitchell 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott 

Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 

Accounting Department: Eva M. Sanfor 

Florence Ettenberg 

Secretary to Publisher: Janet Whittier 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 

i ■ I with TV fix. utlv. editorial, .'inulation, » 

Or i in E, 19th si i 19th A Ma.lii.i- 

It 17, N. 1 Telei MUrraj Hill 8 :>;' 

II!!, , 161 ] Ol nil I \w I'll 111' SI |,r 

Office: 27<lrt Carlisle St. Phone: B 

i ■ \ If] -." Suniel Boulen 

Phoni ii i 8089 Printing Office: 8110 ) 

Ave., Baltl ii' 11, Md Subscriptions United Sts 

js ii i Cam hi and foreign $9. sinclc copies K 
Pi Inted In V.8.A iddre ill ■ to 

I 1911 SI New Yo'k 17 X V Ml iiiiv lllll S 27! 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 



don't "PICK BLIND" 

IN SHREVEPORT! 




look at KWICHs HOOPERS! 



KWKH is the favorite station in portions 
of three states — yet we're the top-heavy 
local choice, too! Check our Hoopers 
for Metropolitan Shreveport against those 
of the four other stations (and all three 
other networks). 



JAN. -FEB., 1<?54 — SE-SARE OF AUDIENCE 



TIME 


KWKH 


STAl ON B 


STUION C 


STATION D 


STATION E 


tOU mru 
8 00 A.M 12 00 Noon 


38.1 


19.5 


6.2 


16.0 


19.5 


'.ION thru FRI. 
1200 Noon 6.00 P.M. 


44.3 


21.2 


9.2 


6.1 


19.4 


SUN Ihru SAT I'VE. 

6:00 p.m. - io :o P.M. 


54.6 




11.2 


8.5 


24.0 



look at KWKH s SAMS AREA! 



KWKH is tuned in by 22.3% more homes, daytime, than all 
other Shreveport stations combined! In listener s-per-dollar, 
KWKH tops the next-best Shreveport station 89.4%! TEXAS 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 
I TEXAS 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



The Branham Co. 
Representatives 



Henry Clay 
General Manager 



Fred Watkins 
Commercial Manager 




LOUISIANA 



ARKANSAS 




WENATCHEE. WASH. 
WORLD'S APPLE CAPITOL 



This Apple 
is a 
plum . ♦ ♦ 



A Plum 

that time buyers should readi- 
ly pluck when they are con- 
sidering national or regional 
coverage. 

286 Million Dollar Market 



Sales Performance 

160'' higher in propor- 
tion to population than 
national average. 



I 
I 



Serving Fastest Crowing 
Farm Area 

The Columbia Basin . . . 
nearly 500 new farms 
a year! 

Per Capita Income 

16% above national 
average. 



5000 WATTS 
560 K. C. 
WENATCHEE 
WASHINGTON 




Starting 
Our 26th 
Year 



REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Moore and Lund, Seattle, Wash. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Forjoc and Co., Incorporated 




by Bob Foreman 

Television is a woman's world 

J hi- essay should be of intense interest as well as of grave 
import to those in advertising — especially in television adver- 
tising. The subject is women. 

I dwell on this favorite topic because to buttress my own 
observation, I have at last obtained some impersonal evi- 
dence exploding the ancient Teutonic myth that the Man of 
the House is lord and master of all he surveys with his off- 
spring clustered about his feet and cowering by his side the 
little woman to whom he continually barks order-, recom- 
mends provender and selects the correct mode and method of 
pursuing life. 

The above concept, unmitigated bushwa to those of us in 
the know, is given the lie to nicely in the following data re- 
leased by the Institute of Life Insurance which knows more 
about people than anyone except perhaps the credit manager 
<>f your friendly jeweler. 

The publication which considered this news sufficiently fit 
to print was the masculine New York Times and I doff my hat 
to them for their courage and honesty in spreading the true 
gospel. I quote: HEADLINE, Women Take Hold of Home 
Finances; SUBHEAD. Study Shows More Wives Than Hus- 
bands Write Check-. 

"\ traditional male attitude that women 'must be protected 
from complicated business matters' is nearly out-moded. ac- 
cording to finding- in a recent study by the Institute oJ Lite 
I ii -ii ranee. 

"In a report of a survey of 50 banks throughout the coun- 
try the institute says that more women than men. particularly 
in young families, mile the family check-. 

Women . . . generally accompanied their husbands when 
the) uenl to the bank to discuss loan- and \er\ often the ui\e- 
were better informed . . ." 

The hearing that tin- ha- on advertising first and telex ision 
second is worths of a sentence or two though perhaps such IS 
superfluous. It is simple, indeed, to understand thai the same 
sex which ha- branched out into and taken such a linn hold on 
the more abstruse financial mailer- i- of course the dominant 
force when il come- lo such minor decisions a- the -election ol 
a brand of beer for the refrigerator, the cigarette lor the liv- 
ing room cigarette boxes and the dream-boal in the family 
garage. \\\A anyone who doubt- tin- i- either a spinster or 

Bellevue bait. 

i Please turn /<> page 66) 

SPONSOR 



...things are 





in denver 



DOMINATES 



TOTAL 

Total 
Exclusive 
1st Place 
Quarter 
Hours 



79 



BEAMING BETTER PROGRAMS from 



KBTV 


2 to 6 p. m. 44 


6 to 11:30 p.m. 35 






ATOP LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN 



Monday thru Friday KBTV is FIRST with the FINEST! 

First place quarter hour figures are based on leadership 

by 1 full point or more in the Nov. 1954 ARB. 

THERE'S A GOLD MINE 
ON CHANNEL 9 



V 



STATION B 
2 to 6 p.m. 12 

6 to 11:30 p.m. 37 

TOTAL 49' 




Strike pay dirt... every time... on 
NINE! Not just gold, not just uran- 
ium in mile hi Denver... NINE de- 
livers the audience! Double, triple 
your client's impressions per com- 
mercial. Top notch availabilities for 
'Fifty-Fivers. ..Come and claim 'em! 



STATION C 
2 to 6 p.m. 2 

6 to 11:30 p.m. 26 

~28< 



STATION D 
2 to 6 p.m. 
6 to 11:30 p.m. 

TOTAL 




JOE HEROLD, Manager • Contact your nearest Free & Peters Representativ 

STUDIOS AND OFFICES: 1089 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 



:■■■■■■■■ :■:■:■:■ 



Sale is i 




. 



• Full Details Available 



7\Mocia%ul /4$hi 



SPONSOR 






^^^^^^ (No Matter Who Pays the BUI) A 



AND IN TULSA... 

Local sales are good . . . very good indeed! 

AND . . . 

Standouts in local sales are those being made by Tulsa radio 
stations to Tulsa merchants! 

Interesting, isn't it! Local radio advertising in Tulsa is very 
good indeed. 

Local station salesmen are experiencing their highest monthly 
gross in years! 

WHY? 

Because, in Tulsa, radio advertising is producing consistent, 
profitable results. Local merchants who can watch advertising 
results closely, day by day, watch advertising costs . . . they 
know AT ONCE what advertising pays off. 

They know RADIO advertising pays off. Their cash registers 
prove it! 

Want to know more? Want some success stories? Want to know 
how YOU can use radio advertising in Tulsa for YOUR clients? 
Contact any one of the Associated Tulsa Broadcasters, either 
direct or through their representatives. 

Remember . . . EYERY sale is a LOCAL sale . . . no matter who 
pays the bill! So, take a tip from the men on the PAY OFF LINE 
. . . the LOCAL buyers of advertising . . . They're using Radio 
advertising in Tulsa. 

How about YOU? 



KAKC • KFMJ • KOME • KRMG 



10 JANUARY 1955 






There's only one 



. . . Niagara Falls, the great falls of the 
Niagara River, divided into Horseshoe Falls 
on the Canadian side, 158 feet high, and 
American Falls, 167 feet high. Over Niagara 
Falls, 1,J,00 feet ivide, flows some 212,211 
cubic feet of water per second, and because 
four of the Great Lakes serve as its reser- 
voir, Niagara has the steadiest flow of all 
great waterfalls. 




tm 




And there's only one... 

...advertising medium that single- 
handed covers the Industrial Heart 
of America. Only WWVA Radio in 
Wheeling, W Va., reaches all the 
100-odd counties of Eastern Ohio, 
Western Pennsylvania and West 
Virginia that comprise this Five 
Billion Dollar market . . .WWVA 
blankets this entire area 24 hours a 
day with its dominating 50,000 watt 
signal, delivering the sales impact 
of high-rated CBS Network shows, 
coupled with the homespun appeal 



of WWVA's own local personalities. 
With WWVA Radio, you not only 
reach this market of more than a 
million and a half radio homes, but 
you sell it completely with 

• One Medium 

• One Cost 

• One Billing 





©WWVA 

Wheeling, W Va. • 50,000 watts-CBS Radio 



National Sales Director-Tom Marker, 118 E. 57th St., N.Y. C, EL 5-7690 



Neiv and renew 



SPIESIt 



10 JANUARY 1955 



1. New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Amer Fed of Labor, Wash DC 


Furman, Feiner & Co, NY 


ABC 


164 


Edward P. Morgan News; M-F 10-10:15 pm; 3 
Jan; 52 wks 


Bankers Life & Casualty Co, Chi 


Crant, Schwcnck & Baker, 
Chi 


MBS 


400 


Gabriel Heattcr News; alt T 7:30-45 pm; 4 Jan; 
52 wks 


Brown & Williamson (Kool), Louis- 


Ted Bates. NY 


NBC 


full net 


Kenneth Banghart News; W, Th 8:30-35 pm; 6 


ville, Ky 








Jan; 55 season 


Calgon, Inc. Pittsburgh 


Ketchum, MacLeod & 
Grove, Pittsb 


NBC 


full net 


Mary Margaret McBride; Sat 10-10:05 am; 5 Feb; 
55 season 


Consolidated Cosmetics, Chi 


Frank Duggan, Chi 


CBS 


206 


Bing Crosby Show; M 9:15-30 pm: 3 Jan; 52 wks 


Esso Standard Oil Co, NY 


Marschalk & Pratt, NY 


MBS 




Esso News Reporter; M-F 9-9:05 pm; 27 Dec; 52 
Kraft Five-Star Newscast; M-F 10:30-35 am; 


Kraft Foods, Chi 


NL&B, Chi 


MBS 


570 










11:25-30 am; 12:15-20 pm; 2:25-30 pm; 5:55- 










6 pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 


Mutual Benefit Health & Accident 


Bozcll & Jacobs, Omaha 


CBS 


206 


Arthur Godfrey Time; alt M, alt Th, every 4th F 


Assoc, Omaha 


& NY 






10-10:15 am; 13 |an; 26 wks 


Lewis-Howe Co 'Turns', St Louis 


R&R, St Louis 


CBS 


206 


Arthur Godfrey Time; alt T, alt W, every 4th F 
10-10:15 am; 28 Dec; 52 wks 


Olson Rug Co, Chi 


Presba, Fellers, Presba, Chi 


MBS 


400 


Gabriel Heatter News; Th 7:30-7:45 pm; 6 Jan; 

4 wks 
Your Packard Reporter; M. W, Th, F 8:25; 9:25; 


Packard div of Studebaker-Packard 


R&R, NY 


ABC 


350 


Corp, Detr 








10:25 pm; 17 Jan; 2 wks 


Philip Morris, NY 


Biow, NY 


CBS 


206 


Tennessee Ernie Show; W, Th, F 7:25-30 pm; 5 
Jan; 52 wks 


Rcxall Drug Co, LA 


BBDO, LA 


NBC 


full net 


Great Gildersleeve; T, W 10:15-30 pm; 15. 16 
Feb only 


Star-Kist Foods, Inc, Terminal Island, 


Rhoades & Davis, SF 


NBC 


full net 


Mary Margaret McBride; W 10-10:05 am; 5 Jan; 


Cal 








55 season 


Vitamin Corp of Amer, Newark, NJ 


BBDO, NY 


NBC 


full net 


Ben Grauer News; T 3-3:05 pm; 1 Feb only 


Vitamin Corp of Amer, Newark, NJ 


BB30, NY 


' BC 


full net 


Five Minute News; Th 9-9:05 pm; 20 Jan only 





2. Renewed on 



Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 




AGENCY 


Anheuser-Busch. St 
Bristol-Myers, NY 


Louis 




D'Arcy, St Louis 
DCSS, NY 


Cities Service Co, 


NY 




Ellington & Co, NY 


Dodge div of Chry 


sler, Detr 




Crant, Detr 


Ford div of Ford 

Mich 
General Foods, NY 


vlotors, Dearborn, 


JWT, Chi 
Y&R, NY 


Hall Bros, Kans City, Mo 




FC&B, Chi 


Lever Bros, NY 

Liggett & Myers (Chesterfie 


Id), NY 


FC&B, NY 
C&W, NY 


Thomas J. Lipton, 


Hoboken, 


NJ 


Y&R, NY 


P. Lorillard, NY 






L&N, NY 


P. Lorillard, NY 






L&N. NY 


Philco Corp, Phila 






Hutchins Adv, Phila 


Philip Morris, NY 
Procter & Gamble, 
Procter & Gamble 
Procter & Gamble 
Procter & Gamble 
Procter & Gamble 
Procter & Camble 
Procter & Camble, 


Cinci 
Cinci 
Cinci 
Cinci 
Cinci 
Cinci 
Cinci 




Biow, NY 
Y&R. NY 
Compton, NY 
DFS, Chi 
B&B, NY 
Compton, NY 
B&B, NY 
Compton, NY 


R. J. Reynolds (Camelsl, Winston- 
Salem, NC 
Sterling Drug, NY 
Sterling Drug, NY 


W. Esty, NY 

DFSS, NY 
DFSS, NY 


Wm. Wrigley Co, 


Chi 




A. Meyerhoff, Chi 


Wm. Wrigley Co, 


Chi 




R&R, Chi 



STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


ABC 


350 




Sports Today; M-F 6:30-45 pm; 14 Dec: 52 wks 


CBS 


206 




This is Nora Drake; T, Th, alt F, 2:30-45 pm; 4 
Jan; 52 wks 


NBC 


full 


net 


Cities Service Band of America; M 9:30-10 pm; 
17 |an; 55 season 


NBC 


full 


net 


Roy Rogers Show; Th 8-8:30 pm; 27 Jan; 55 
season 


CBS 


485 




Edward R. Murrow with the News; M, W, F, 
7:45-8 pm; 27 Dec: 52 wks 


CBS 


119 




Sunday Morning Gathering; Sun 8:30-55 am; 2 
Jan; 52 wks 


CBS 


206 




Hallmark Hall of Fame; Sun 6:30-7 pm; 2 Jan: 
52 wks 


CBS 


195 




Aunt Jenny; M-F 12:15-30 pm; 13 Dec; 52 wks 


CBS 


206 




Perry Como Show; M, W, F, 9-9:15 pm; 3 Jan; 
52 wks 


CBS 


163 




Arthur Codfrey's Talent Scouts; M 8:30-9 pm; 3 
Jan; 52 wks 


MBS 


570 




Queen for a Day; M-F 11:30-12 noon: 3 Jan; 52 

wks 
Two for the Money; Sat 9-9:30 pm; 31 Dec; 52 

Breakfast Club; M, W, F 9:45-10 am; 27 Dec: 


CBS 


206 




ABC 


350 










52 wks 


CBS 


205 




My Little Margie; Sun 8:30-9 pm; 2 Jan: 52 wk; 


CBS 


173 




Brighter Day; M-F 2:45-3 pm; 27 Dec; 52 wks 


CBS 


132 




Guiding Light; M-F 1:45-2 pm; 27 Dec: 52 wk; 


CBS 


170 




Ma Perkins; M-F 1:15-30 pm; 27 Dec: 52 wks 


CBS 


163 




Perry Mason; M-F 2:15-30 pm: 27 Dec; 52 wks 


CBS 


143 




Road of Life; M-F 1-1:15 pm; 27 Dec; 52 wks 


CBS 


103 




Rosemary; M-F 11:45-12 noon; 27 Dec; 52 wks 


CBS 


160 




Young Dr. Malone; M-F 1:30-45 pm; 27 Dec; 52 

wks 
Multi-Message Plan; M-F; 1 Jan; 52 wks 


MBS 


570 




NBC 


full 


net 


Stella Dallas; M-F 4-4:15 pm: 3 Jan; 55 season 


NBC 


full 


net 


Young Widder Brown; M-F 4:15-30 pm; 3 Jan; S c . 
season 


CBS 


194 




FBI in Peace and War; W 8-8:25 pm; 5 Jan; 5/ 
wks 


CBS 


196 




Gene Autry Show; Sun 6-6:30 pm; 19 Dec; 52 wk: 



3. Broadcast Industry Executives 



NAME 



Harry Abbott 
Robert N. Adams 
Sherman Adler 
Leslie Bicbl 
Jacques Birabcn 
Walter Brown 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



KTVQ, Okla City, mgr 
WRC-TV, Wash D C 
WMCT-TV, Memphis 
WISN, Milw, prog mgr 
WINS, NY, nat'l sis mgr 
BAB, NY, local prom stf 



NEW AFFILIATION 



KCEN-TV. Temple. Texas, mgr 
WTOF-TV, Wash DC, prom dir 
NBC Film Div, NY, sis stf 
WHK, Cleve. opcrs mgr 
Same, dir of sis 
Same, acct exec 



In next issue: ISetc and Renewed on Television (Network) ; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes: 
Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



John 
Porter (3) 





Leslie 
Biebl (3) 




Norman 
Ginsburg (3) 



10 JANUARY 1955 



11 



10 JANUARY 1955 



JVew and renew 



Lee 
LcBlang (3) 




Norman 
Cash (3) 




David 
Savage (3) 




Cody 
Pfanstiehl (3) 




Cordon Wil- 
liamson (3) 




Hal A. 
Zogg (3) 




3. Broadcast Industry Executives ( 


continued) 


NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 


Richard Buch 


CBS-TV Film Sales, NY, acct exec 


General Telcradio. Atlanta, Ga, acct exec 


John Buning 


MBS, NY, stn rels mgr in Southeast 


WSUN St Petersburg, sis mgr 


Norman Cash 


ABC Radio, NY, Eastern sis mgr 


TvB, NY, dir of stn rels 


William Cathay 


Olympia Brewing Co, Olympia, Wash, mdsg & adv mgr 


KOMO-TV, Seattle, mdsg & sis serv rep 


Ernesto Cervera 


KALI, Pasadena, Cal. prog dir 


Same, comml mgr 


Ben Conway 


Crosley Bdcst, NY, acct exec 


Quality Radio Group, NY, acct exec 


Tay Day 


CBS TV Spot Sales. NY, res mgr 


Quality Radio Croup, NY, dir of sis dev 


Robert Douglas 


WKNX, AM, TV, Saginaw, Mich, tv sis prom mgr 


WTVH-TV, Peoria, acct exec 


Roy Drushall 


KWKW, Pasadena, sis stf 


KABC. Hywo. sis stf 


Howard Eaton 


KTVW, Seattle, local sis stf 


Same, nat'l sis rep 


William Fairbanks 


ABC Radio, NY, acct exec 


Same, nat'l sis mgr 


John Foley 


WEWS, Cleve, sis stf 


Same, local sis mgr 


Mcrl Calusha 


WRCB-TV, Schenectady, NY, supvr of prodn 


WCY-WCFM, Schenectady, NY, mgr 


lack Gilbert 


KHOL-TV, Holdrege, Neb, asst mgr 


Same, stn & opers mgr 


John C. Cilmore 


WCH, Norfolk. Va, dir of sis prom 


WVDA-Diehm Radio Group, Bost, dir of sis prom 


Norman Cinsburg 


DuMont Net, NY, adv tr prom mgr 


Studio Films, NY, dir of adv & sis prom 


Ralph Clazcr 


KNX-CPRN, LA, acct exec 


Same, Eastern sis rep 


lay Grill 


KCO. SF, sis stf 


KFSD-TV, San Diego, sis mgr 


Idclla Grindlay 


WABC-TV. NY, stn opers mgr 


Quality Kaaio Groin) NY, prog coord 


Richard Gurley 


WTAO. AM, TV, Cambridge, Mass, sis mgr 


WEbl, Bost, sis stf 


Charles E. Haddix 


KLX. Oakland, Cal, SF sis mgr 


Tracy Moore Radio Rep, SF, mgr 


Edward Hall 


CBS Radio NY, acting bus mgr of sis dept 


Vitapix, NY, vp & gen mgr 


Bill Harms |r 


Ed Petry, Chi, tv acct exec 


Avery-Knodel, Chi, tv acct exec 


Richard Hartnett 


Eastern Airlines, Bost 


WEEI. Bost, sis exec 


Willard Hasbrook 


KFXM, San Bernardino, mgr 


KFSD, San Diego, mgr 


Rollin Hawkes 


Romington Rand Business Mach. Seattle, sis stf 


KOMO, Seattle, nat'l sis serv rep 


Erik Hazelhoff 


NBC. NY. editorial writer for Today 


Same, Telesales dept mgr 


Richard Hellyer 


Vogue-Wright Studios, Chi, adviser tv commls 


WLS, Chi, mgr of sis prom 


Charles Herbert 


Ward Wheelock Adv, Hywd, prodr-dir, acct exec 


KOOL-TV, Phoenix, prog sis coord 


John Lee Herbert 


McCalls, NY 


C. Hollingbcry. NY, radio sis stf 


Samuel Hill Jr 


KNXT, Hywd, acct exec 


CBS Tv Spot Sis, SF, acct exec 


Edward Hitz 


NBC, Chi, mgr of Tv net sis, central div 


Same, vp in chg of net sis, central div 


Wallace Hutchinson 


|ohn Poole Bdcst Co, LA, prom & gen sis mgr 


KNX. LA. sis rep 


George Hurst 


CBS Radio Spot Sis, LA. mgr 


KMOX, St Louis, nat'l sis mgr 


Allan Hughes 


CBS, NY, mgr of presentations 


CBS Radio Spot Sis, Chi, mgr sis dev 


Peter |ames 


Weed Tv, NY, mgr & dir 


W|AR-TV, Providence, mgr 


Fred Kiefer 


NBC, Pa & N) dist supvr, mdsg dept 


Same, NY, asst mgr mdsg dept 


Malcolm Kipp 


MCA-TV, NY, sis dept 


ABC Film Syndication, NY, sis stf 


|ohn Klatt 


McCann-Erickson, Chi, media dir 


SRDS. Evanston, III. rate serv media rels dir 


James Knox 


U.S. Marines 


ABC. Chi, tv prodn coord. Central div 


Lee LcBlang 


WCBS-TV, NY, asst adv & sis prom dir 


Investment & Insurance Counselor. NY. estate 
counseling 


Herman Liveright 


WDSU-TV. New O'leans. tv prodn mgr 


Same, prog dir 


Roland McClure 


KNX. LA, sis reo 


KNX-CPRN, LA, acct exec 


Thomas McFadden 


NBC Spot Sis, NY, mgr 


Same, vp in chg of Spot Sis 


)im McCovern 


KCTV. Dcs Moines, news & spec events dir 


KEYD-TV, Mpls, prom mgr 


John McCuire 


KOA-TV, Denver, acct exec 


John McGuire Stn Rep, Denver, owner & mgr 


Robert McKendrick 


WLOK-TV, Lima, Ohio 


WW|-TV, Detr, asst prog & prodn mgr 


Carroll McKenna 


BAB, NY, nat'l prom stf 


Same, nat'l prom dir 


Frank McL.itchy 


KSL, Salt Lake City, sis mgr 


Same, mgr of sis dev 


Lawrence Menkin 


WOR-TV, NY, prog dir 


Guild Films, NY, prog dir 


Ole Morby 


CBS, Hywd, Western div mgr, stn rels 


Same, mgr of stn rels 


Caleb Paine 


Gen Electric Bdcst Stns, Schenectady, NY. dir of pub scrv 


Same, stn serv section mgr 


E Hie Palmieri 


Community Chest, Cleve, publicity hd 


WDOK. Cleve, sis rep 


Benton Paschall 


WNOE, New Orleans, vp & gen mgr 


KMOD, Modesto, Cal. LA sis mgr 


Cody Pfanstiehl 


WTOP-TV, Wash DC, prom dir 


WTOP Inc. Wash DC. pub rel dir 


John Porter 


NBC. NY, mgr of nat'l sis prom 


Same, mgr of adv & prom dept 


Miller Robertson 


KEPO, El Paso, Texas, owner 


WTCN, Mpls, asst gen mgr 


Richard Roger 


United World Films. NY, sis stf 


Sterling Tv, NY, sis stf 


William Rosensohn 


Box Office Tv, NY, exec vp 


Same, pres 


Dick Rutter 


Television Aee, NY. mng ed 


Market Relations Net, NY, asst dir of pub 


lack Satterfield 


WSAZ. Huntington, W Va 


WLW-D, Dayton, sis dept 


David Savage 


NBC, NY, dir of film procurement 


Guild Films, NY, dir of stn rels 


Richard Schutte 


KING. Seattle, local sis acct exec 


CBS Radio Spot Sis, SF, acct exec 


Newell Schwin 


CBS Central Div, Chi, exec asst 


CBS Radio Spot Sis. NY, mgr of sis dev 


Hamilton Shea 


WRCA, AM, FM, TV, NY, gen mgr 


Same, vp 


Richard Simon 


WOR-TV, NY, stf dir 


Allied Tv Prodn, NY. prodr-dir 


Robert Smith 


vVINS, NY prog mgr 


Same, admin asst to gen mgr 


Frank Soden 


WRNL, Richmond, sis stf 


Same, gen sis mgr 


Richard Soule 


NBC. NY, tv net sis reo 


Same, tv net stn sis rep 


Bob Stern 


lay Lurye Assoc. Duluth. Minn, pub dir 


WMIN-TV. Mpls-St Paul, prom mgr 


Thomas Swafford 


KNX, LA, Eastern sis rep 


CBS Radio Spot Sis. NY, acct exec 


Edwin Vane 


NBC. TV. coord tv net sis prom 


Same, mgr of nat'l sis prom 


Floyd Weidman 


WEWS, Cleve, sis mgr 


Same, gen exec 


Raymond Welpotf 


WRCT-WCY. Schenectady, NY, stn opers mgr 


WRCB, Schenectady, NY. mgr 


Gordon Williamson 


WISE-TV, Ashcville, NC, mgr 


WFMY-TV. Greensboro. NC, opers mgr 


Robert S. Wilson 


Katz Agency, NY 


KCUL-TV, Galveston, Texas, gen sis mgr 


lack Woolley 


Searle & Parks. LA, gen mgr 


CBS Radio Spot Sis. LA, mgr 


Hal Zogg 


KOTA. Rapid City, SD. acct exec 


KUTV, Salt Lake City, acct exec 



4. New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



American Tuck Co, NY 

Atlas Van-Lines 

Campana Sis Co, Batavia. Ill 

Colden Mfg, Newark, N| 

Roman Meal Co, Tacoma, Wash 

WOND Pleasantville & Atlantic City, N| 



Tape 

Storage & Moving Service 

Ayds 

Fomcd-Hair, Lace-O-Matic 

Pic crust & muffin mix 

Radio Station 



AGENCY 



Grey Adv, NY 

Gray & Rogers. Phila 

Frwm. W^scy & Co. Chi 

Wexton Co. NY 

Roy S. Durstinc, NY 

London Adv, Newark 



5. New Firms, New Offices, Changes of Address 



American Adv Bureau; new Okla City ad agency; David Mill 

head & acct exec 
Ted Ashley Assoc becomes Ashley-Steincr Corp; new & Ig 

offices at 449 S. Beverly Dr Hywd 
Boiling Co, r-tv reps move to 247 Park Ave; PL 9-8150 
Filmack Studios open NY office at 630 9th Ave 
r o r & Fioie; new ad agency. 128 Mallory. |ersey City. N| 
Hi shon-Carfield. new offices at 420 Boylston St, Boston 



McCann-Erickson. NY, merges with Marschalk & Pratt, NY: 

effect 1 Jan; remain at 535 5th Ave 
|ohn L. McCuiie. new r-tv rep; Denver 
Procter Tv Enterprises open West coast office 
Victory Tv Enterprises, Inc; new firm; 5 E. Preston St. Bait 
Wexton Co. new & Ig offices; 11 E. 47th St. NY; Mu 8 4050 
WOL & WOL FM; new offices & studios at 2000 P St. NW 

Wash. DC 



12 



SPONSOR 



EPETITIO N 
GETS 

ESULTS! 



and WCOFs cost per thousand permits^ 
the highest frequency of 
impression in Greater Boston. 




Persistency pays. And smart advertisers know that it takes fre- 
quency of impression to open a market's pocketbooks. 

In the compact Greater Boston market, WCOP's one-minute satura- 
tion plan provides the incredibly low cost per thousand of just 
19?. Thus in America's second most concentrated market, WCOP 
provides more frequency of im pression and MORE RESULTS per 
dollar than any other Boston station. 

Ask your station or WEED representative for the fact-revealing story 
"HOW TO SELL THE CREAM MARKET OF NEW ENGLAND." 



Sets per dollar delivered in Greater 
Boston by Boston stations, on minute 
package basis: 

WCOP 5,262 



Stat 
Stat 
Stat 
Stat 
Stat 



on B 3,333 

on C 2,176 

on D 1,867 

on E 1,785 

on F 1,470 




SS&S 



BOSTON 



OOOuattson 1150 




GOOD 



. . . advertising 



, always pays in the 
'/ /<•■ /, ■■ /| I: \ 



A 



1 



RICH, GROWING 

NORTH CAROLINA 

MARKET 



D C I I E K . . . coverage 
than ever before is yours with 
RADIO in the 



15-county 

Winston-Salem 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Market 



Dl)I . . . buy morning, 
afternoon and evening is 




Represented by 

HEADLEY-REED CO. 



/I rtW 



u 



1 



01/1' 



MADISON 



sponsor invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 

SHOULD SPONSORS SELL? 

1 should like to add my comments. 
if I may. on your recent forum feature 
(29 November 1954) about sponsors 
as salesmen on the air. 

Scarcely a day goes by that a com- 
pany president doesn't ask me if he 
can appear in one of our television 
commercials. This is natural, since the 
current SAG scale pays commercial 
announcers more than corporation 
presidents. If you think I'm joking, 
look up the scale for unlimited use of 
film commercials on Class "A" time. 

Unfortunately, I have to tell them 
that the stakes are too high. And since, 
of course, these presidents aren't cli- 
ents of mine, I can get away it. Our 
clients have better sense. 

Seriously, commercial presentation 
is a highly developed art. Even among 
professed career announcers, scarcely 
one in 20 can stand up satisfactorily 
to the frightening demands of direct 
selling into a television camera. 

My only direct experience with a 
sponsor-announcer was the appearance 
of Clarence Francis on the big General 
Foods anniversary show. Mr. Francis 
was an "announcer"' on this show only 
in the sense that he appeared briefly 
in the opening as a host. He did that 
with consummate charm and grace 
(really — you should see his fan mail 
from it!) because Clarence Francis is 
charming by nature, and television 
tells few lies about people. He did 
not pretend to do direct product sell- 
ing. The announcer hired to do the 
product commercials (both for us and 
for Y&R, who produced the program) 
was Anna Lee, a professional actress. 

The perfect announcer-president may 
verj well be right around the corner. 
\l I lie moment, however. I think it is 
mure likely that some fee-fattened an- 
nouncer will become a president than 
that a president will become an an- 
nouncer. 

Kn Shepherd \Ikad 

Vice President, Radio & Tv 

Copy Chief 
Benton X- lion Irs, Inc. 



LETTER FROM HOME 

It's been quite a while since I've 
read sponsor — not since I left Man- 
hattan last March, in fact. KTVW 
just started subscribing to it, and read- 
ing the November 29 issue the other 
day \\a> quite a pleasure — sort of like 
a "letter from home." 

Noticed the article on your Tv Dic- 
tionary Handbook. With a new set- 
up like this is, it'd be a helpful item 
to have around. Would you let me 
know how much a copy costs? 

One of the things I'm still using is 
a copy of the dictionary you sent my 
old boss, Chester MacCracken, which 
he gave me — when I was with Doher- 
t\, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield. 

Edna K. Hanna 
KTVW, Seattle 

• The Tv Dictionary/Handbook for Sponsor! 

is being reprinlcd in book form and will be 

available 15 January 1955. Cost is $2 eaeh ; 
quantity prices on request. 



TELE-LUXEMBOURG 

Jacques du Closel and Jean D'Agos- 
tino, recently in New York for Tele- 
Luxembourg, commercial French-lan- 
guage tv station, have contacted sev- 
eral tv film producers to procure pro- 
graming for Europe. 

They have asked sponsor to thank 
these producers for their cooperation 
and to affirm to them once again that 
no other representative but Guv Bo- 
lam, representative of Radio-Luxem- 
bourg in New York, is allowed or au- 
thorized to deal in their name. 

J KAN D'AGOSTINO 

Director 

Information <fc Publicity 

Paris, France 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 

The December 13 issue of sponsor 
came my w r ay this morning, and in it 
I found my picture and comments in 
your "Timebuyers at Work" column. 
I \er\ much appreciate your using this. 

Already I have heard several nice 
comments from friends in the adver- 
tising field — which, naturally, means 
a great deal to me personally. But it 
also shows that sponsor is a magazine 
that gets read immediately by a good 
number of people out here in the wide 
open spaces. 

|)o\ \msdi \ 
Radio & Tv Department 
Mien & Reynolds 
Omaha, Ncbr. 
i Please turn i<> page 103 I 



14 



SPONSOR 



w 



T V 



J 



I 





CHANNEL 

6 









V 



BAY CITY 



I « 





I 



u 



Coverage fhaf Counts! 

7 major Michigan markets 
for NBC, CBS, and ABC 

Now 100,000 waffs. 1 



Furs by Raynord of New York 



Edward Pttry ft Co., Inc. 



WAT 



SUP) 




ON-AIR" AT WBRE-TV 



>WER UHF 





This announcement marks another achievement in RCA high-power 
equipment leadership. For the first time, a commercial UHF television 
station is operating with an effective radiated power of one million 
watts! For the first time, a UHF station is getting coverage close-in 
AND far out! And best of all, super television power„ ; has proved just 
as easy to handle as lower powers. I Mg, 

How do you get started with RCA super power? You begin with your 
own RCA 1-K.W transmitter. You add the new RCA 2 5-KW amplifier. 
You install the new RCA Super Power UHF Pylon (gain, 46)— and 
you're set to go with 1 million watts ERP. Power tubes in both RCA 
high-power* amplifiers are conventional and interchangeable (no 
klystrons used). Amplifier plate voltages are low (6000 volts, max.). 
Operating economy is remarkableX (RCA's new Super power, high- 
gain antenna eliminAtjbs need for hiVti\power inpyt. Ojower tubes have 
already set a record VoV "proved-in'\ life). 




on/^t. 





New RCA Super Power 
UHF Pylon Antenna. 
Available Types: TFU- 
46AL, TFU-52-A^, 
TFU-60-AH. SignaT 
Gain, 46, 52 and 60. 
The answer for eco- 
nomical 1-million watt 
operation. 



proved^fK/daily commerpal operation a*\ WBRE-TV, tWsper- 
formance of RCA's 1-million \Aatt UHF system isVow an established 
record. Profityby RCA's engineering experience in high-power — 
and KNOW /ou've planned it right. Call your RCA Broadcast Sales 
Representative. In Canada, write RCA Victor Ltd., Montreal. 



RCA Pioneered and Developed Compatible Color Television 



-^ — o«i 




V 



For 1955... 
Fresno's Greatest 
Independent is the 



KBIF 



TRANSMITTER SITE... 

Near the center of Fresno, 
with maximum conductivity. 

TOWER... 

400-foot "center loaded". . . 
actually two towers, one atop 
the other, separated by 
insulator and loading coil. 
Owner John Poole, who 
capitalized on "salt water 
co\ erage" so successfully 
w itli The Catalina Station 
KBIG, has done it again with 
KBIF. . . increasing output by 
209? with a technique proven 
by "hams" but generally 
overlooked by broadcasters. 

COVERAGE... 

Signal three times more 
powerful in Fresno . . . 3000 
more square miles of coverage , 
with 100.000 additional 
listeners, within 25 MV area. 

STUDIOS... 

Ground floor, Californian 
Hotel, center of downtown 
Fresno business and social life. 

TALENT... 

Featuring Big Four Disc 
Jockeys : Stu Wilson, Bob 
Ulrich, Dave Maxwell, Jim 
Bailey . . . with "Music You 
Like and Just Enough News, 
All Day Long!' 

PROMOTION... 

Newspapers, busses, bill- 
boards. Great on-the-air spots 
by Artie Wayne, The Crew 
Chiefs and The Bell Aires. 

Check your KB/ 1 representa- 
tive or Robert Meeker contact 
for the lull .story on the 
NEW KBIF. 




FRESNO'S GREATEST INDEPENDENT 

900 kilocycles 
1000 watts 

JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING COMPANY 
General Offices Californian Hotel 

Fresno, Calif. • Telephone: Fresno 6-0791 






.-If fen Kfriiner, Friend-Reiss, New York, says 
that 1955 Will be the biggest \eur lor spot tr. 
" Man-) new and smaller clients are finding that spot 
buys produce good results for them:' Al told 
sponsor. "For one thing, the quality of syndicated 
film shows has been improving continuously, to 
the point where a local or regional advertiser can 
become identified with a very good show. Of 
course, network branching out into station time 
does curtail availabilities. However, it doesn't 
look as though the trend will continue. Established 
blue chip tv advertisers are going to stay predomi- 
nantly on network, making local station time 
somewhat less competitive for the smaller tv 
clients. Of these, many who had previously bought 
announcement campaigns only, arc likely to sponsor 
film shows in their major markets for added impact." 



K«i/ Lloyd. McCann-Erickson, Chicago, has a 
yardstick for buying daytime tv announcements. 
Says she, "In determining if daytime tv announce- 
ments are practical for an individual product, 
three points should be considered: (1) the 
adaptability of the sales message to the medium: 
(2) ii hither the budget allows for a schedule of 
enough frequency for sufficient impact : (3) the 
percentage of tv penetration in the market. I 
find daytime tv particularly good for food accounts 
in markets where there arc well-established tele- 
vision stations. Often, cisual techniques, well applied, 
heighten the 'appetite appeal' Again, of course, 
no one medium aloru? is enough for a successful 
campaign. When possible, a dm time schedule 
should lie supplemented with other media to reach 
the mam working women in each mar Let. 



Jan €iilhvrt, Bryan Houston. \ew York, says 
that the late of supply and demand is I cm strong 
in radio. "Take early-morning radio as an example," 
she told sponsor. "Some time ago, advertisers 
discovered that this is a very efficient time to sell 
their products or services. Hence there teas a 

rush on early-morning time until it became very 

tough to cleat anything. \ \ morning time 

is Still a ier\ good bur on radio and it's still a 

ici\ popular one. But timebuyers have been able 
to sell clients on the value of some other lime 
periods us well. Weekend radio was neglected for 
a long time, but it's now coming in for all the 
attention early-morning radio got about a war ago. 

on network, weekend radio has been under- 
going a renaissance, probably as a result of studies 
showing the sue of the out-of-home audience." 



18 



SPONSOR 




"COVERAGE"? 




j 

WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



oure half naked in Nebraska coverage if you 
don't reach Lincoln-land — 42 counties with 202,200 
families — 100,000 unduplicated by any other station! 
Lincoln's population is 110,000 — in the same bracket 
with Lancaster, Pa., Schenectady or South Bend, Ind. 

The KOLN-TV tower is 75 miles from Omaha! This 
LINCOLN-LAND location is farther removed from 
the Omaha market than is Cincinnati from Dayton, 
Buffalo from Rochester or Toledo from Detroit. 



KOLN-TV 



COVERS LINCOLN-LAND— NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 



10 JANUARY 1955 



CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

ABC M2M dum0NT 

c4very-fCnoael, Snc, CxcluHve ^National tf\epreAentative& 

,V4 






.ire. 

4EW YORK, IV. Y, 




By John Cohan 



California sales are important. We 
know thai ^ <»l . as a bus) time Inner 
are besieged b) stations that you can- 
not consider because of a tight budgel 
We appreciate this problem, but would 
like to call these facts t<> your atten- 
tion concerning the stations you buy 
in California to reach the great ex- 
panding Western market. 

KSBW-TN . Channel 8, Salinas-Mon- 
terev. is a 7 town bu) with a population 
that exceeds 

markets. 



mam metropolitan 



W hen vou consider covering Cali- 
tornia, please remember our state is 
over 800 miles long. KSBW-TV is 
107 miles south of San Francisco, in 
the rich Central Coastal Counties, sur- 
rounded by mountains. YOU CAN- 
NOT COVER THIS MARKET UN- 
LESS YOU USE CHANNEL 8, 
Salinas-Monterey. 

The channel 8 transmitter is 3,777 
feet above sea level. Coverage includes 
10 counties (422.709 tv sets, over 
90,000 of which are unduplicated) . 
However, our rate is based on four 
count) coverage. In fact, KSBW-TV 
has the lowest cost per thousand in 
California. 

Retail sales in Monterey, Santa 
i in/. San Benito, Santa Clara and 
Merced ' iounties total ovei TO 1 million- 
dollars. We would appreciate \our 
consideration when you sel your bud- 
gel foi advertisers interested in Cal. 
Sales. 

^ our I lollingbei \ man can give j ou 
the facts al.out KSBW T\ . Salinas 
Monterey, California. 

< Its. MM. ABC, III MONT 

20 




By Joe Csida 

Jiichio Gleason's "SI I million deal" 

It was during the war. on the lot of one of the major 
Hollywood film studios. I was more or less minding my 
own business, when tin- cheery voice yelled "Hey," and 1 
looked around and saw a small soldier coming toward me 
with his bald head gleaming in the sunshine. George Dur- 
gom. better known as "Bullets" opened up a rapid-fire con- 
versation, which didn't seem to make much sense, but some- 
how added up. Bullets, while playing the clown to just the 
degree that would make any average guy want to be with 
him, was then, and is now, a good talent manager. 

A few years later, when the war was over, Bullets was 
managing a singing group who'd been recording for RCA 
Victor, where I was then the artist and repertoire boss. The 
group's contract ran out, and I studied their sales figures and 
recordings at great length. They just weren't selling, and I 
was going to drop them. Bullets came in for a meeting at 
three o'clock one afternoon and I regretfully informed him 
of the decision. To make a long fable short, at one o'clock 
the following morning. Bullets gave up and resigned himself 
to the fact that he wasn't going to be able to hold this group 
on RCA Victor. He had, by that time, pulled out 342 jokes, 
tricks and reasonably serious arguments, plus five dog-eared 
clippings showing that the group had won the Downbeat 
and Metronome poll-. 

Ml iln- i- .i long preamble to vsli.it a small, bald-headed 
gentleman with a sense of humor, a totally irrepressible na- 
ture and a lot of bras- can do to, for and with advertising 
agencies and sponsors. It was Bullet-, of course, who planted 
the stories on the front page- of virtually every newspaper 
in the country to the effect that Mr. Jackie Glea-on was -ci- 



ting $1 l.OOO.OOO from Buick 



lor do 



ing The Honeymooners 



as a half-hour film show for the nexl three years. I wouldn'l 
be unhappy if Gleason wa- gelling S22.<)()0.000. but I'm 
quite sure he isn't gelling c\cw half ol the I I. Actually, a 
good pari of thai figure includes time costs for the show. 1 m 
also sure thai Buick is getting from him main considera- 
tions, which are importanl to their advertising and selling 
activities, which were never mentioned in the stories. 

Vs greal as the talent involved ma) be, I have always bad 
the feeling thai those multi-million dollar contract stories 

make advertisers look a little like m nic Fori Knoxes. Ii - 

even possible thai some prospective automobile purchasers 
i Please linn to page 7 1 i 

SPONSOR 







-?<-■« 



■i 



^Cft 






imffiZfflZ/A 



m 



PlOlOlBllriMg 



Wt'titmUiiZZ&iit)'- 



UJBTV 



■ 









CHARLOTTE 



4 



, \ 



"^ 



UJBTUJ 



ft 



FLORENCE 




-"V 



S.C. ( /- 



N.C. 





WBTV-WBTW combination creates 
market comparable to nation's 8th largest 
in the industry-mushrooming Carolinas 



JEFFERSON STANDARD DROADCASTING COMPANY 



Advertisers have a rich 
stake in what's happening 
in the Carolinas. 

The Carolinas are on the 
march economically, and two 
top-power stations— WBTV 
and WBTW— now service this 
upsurging selling market. 

c 

WBTV and newcomer WBTW 
can, as a combination, 
deliver 50% of the people 
in North and South Carolina. 

Together, WBTV and WBTW 
create a market of 3,375,000 
people, over $3^ billion in 
buying power and $2'/^ billion 
in retail sales-a TV market 
comparable to the eighth 
largest in the nation. 

See the ensuing pages 
for the full dimensions of 
this market and how WBTV 
and WBTW truly measure up 
to : "dominance doubled 
in the Carolinas." 





WBTV COVERAGE AREA SWARMING WIT! 



Steady pace of industrial growth for past 30 years has catap 



ultcf 






The Carolinas account for almost half of all 

• hosiery produced In the U. S Charlotte itself is 
site of the famed Hudson and Belvedere brands. 





The cure of \\ BT\ "s impressive 
market st<>r\ is this: 

The pace of industrial expansion 
within W BTV's coverage area — the 
Piedmont Carolinas — has been of such 
steadfast character the past 30 years 
as to turn the area's occupational ratio 
upside down. Well over twice as main 
people now work In industry as on the 
I arm. 

Since W orld W ar II the trend ol 
industrial wealth in the Piedmont 
Carolinas has been tremendously ac- 
celerated. And there's every indica- 
tion that this level of expansion will 
he maintained for years to come. 

For W BTV the great shift in the 
area's economy represents an audience 
thai is. b\ a very wide stretch, pre- 
dominant 1 .) non-rural. 

Long regarded for its leadership in 
ihe manufacture of textiles, tobacco 
and wood furniture, the Piedmont 
Carolinas have become the scene of 
man) new and diversified industries. 
These include the electric and elec- 
tronic industries with representation 
ol most of the major firing in this field 

paper products, machine parts, syn- 

ihetic \ain-. -emi -plastics, pre-fahri- 

cated metals and processed foods. 
Electric powei is accepted b) eco- 



nomists a> about the best indicator 
of a community or area's growth or 
the composition of industrial commu- 
nities. Well, here- what's happened 
powerwise in the Piedmont Carolinas: 

The customers ol the Duke Powei 
Co., which services the area exclusive- 
ly, used in excess ol In billion kilowatt 
hours last year. In recent years Duke 
has -pent $300 million on the expan- 
sion ol electric capacit) and service 
facilities. \i presenl it is embarking on 
a plant which will produce 1,000,000 
kilowatt- at Belmont, Y C, located 
near Charlotte. 

Stemming from this power expan- 
sion i> anotlici fact especiall) inter- 
esting lo appliance manufacturers and 
distributors. Well over 80$ of the 
farms in the area are now electrified. 
This 80$ of the 159,400 farm homes 
in the area represents over 95$ of 
all gross farm income. 

The Piedmont Carolinas, and. de- 
cidedly, the vast area of which Char- 
lotte is the huh. offer a population 

distribution characteristic which has 
made quite an impression on market- 
ing experts. Instead <>f population 
being concentrated in one dense area, 
here it is spread out among main 
closeh neighboring medium sized 






rvtushroomin^ importance o 
distributing center is typ 
parts pldnl rr-.tin^ well 




(Wtfl/ 




UMEROUS, DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRIES 

ying power; over twice as many employed in industry as on farms 



towns. Many of these towns actually 
run back to back. 

In other words, it's a massed popu- 
lation spread out in clustered commu- 
nities. There are more than 160 cities 
and towns of noteworthy size within 
the 48-county area. This circumstance 
has been of special significance in the 
industrial expansion of the area. Man- 
ufacturers are now inclined to get 



awaj from congested centers and settle 
in smaller communities. In the WBTV 
area a large portion of this labor sup- 
ply owns its own little farms; hence 
these workers have two sources of 
income. 

This unique population distribution 
— scores of sizable towns located with- 
in a relatively short radius of a big 
city — tends to invalidate the standard 



What the "true"* CHARLOTTE Metropolitan Area gives you 

COUNTY POPULATION FAMILIES BUYING INCOME RETAILSALES 

NORTH CAROLINA 

MECKLENBURG 216,400 59,000 $364,307,000 $216,722,000 

GASTON ..... 121,000 31,200 150,586,000 176,384,000 

CABARRUS . 66,200 17,500 84,087,000 60,390,000 

r.\l(}\ 43,700 10,700 36,744,000 33,103,000 

LINCOLN 28,400 7,000 24,125,000 17,027,000 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

YORK 76,000 18,700 90,466,000 62,820,000 

METRO TOTALS 552,000 144,100 $750,585,000 $566,446,000 

SOURCE: 1954 Sales Management "Buying rower." "Considered as a 30-mile radius around 
Charlotte, normalized to county lii es 



metropolitan area formula as far as 
Charlotte is concerned. OlniousK. it 
is neither sound noi practical in mea- 
suring Charlotte's metropolitan area. 
Charlotte, itself, is referred to as 
the "Spearhead of the New South." 
And here are some of the reasons: 

1. The industrial boom in and 
around Charlotte itself is not related 
to one or two types of industries but 
many types. 

2. Charlottes stature as a distribu- 
tion center has grown remarkabl) in 
recent years. All the major appliance 
brands are now represented In distrib- 
utors, and for the past several \ ear- 
some of these appliance distributors 
have consistent!) won lop increased- 
sales awards on national and sectional 
bases. Ford took recognition ol this 
distribution importance by establish- 
ing a massive parts division and Fire- 
stone Tire and Western Electric by 
expanding their facilities in a big way. 

3. Chaiiotte ranks as one of the na- 
tion's largest trucking centers. 

4. The Army is embarking on an 
expenditure of $16 million to renovate 
and equip the old Charlotte Quarter- 
master Depot for the production ol 
the guided missile N 1Kb. 

5. Another major post-war develop- 
ment lias been Charlotte's growth as a 
steel distributing and fabricating 'fil- 
ler. Il is also the largesl distributing 
center of agricultural equipmenl 

the Atlantic seaboard. 



MARKET 




Paper products manufacturing plants abound in tne ■ 
I WBTW area. Sonoco Co. operates at Hartsville, S. 
! C. largest textile cone making mill in the world 




Indication of textile industry's expansion in WBTW 
area is the new Arthur Wellman wool processing 
mill, costing $3,000,000 at Johnsonvillc, S. C. 





,f Carolinas served by wbiw arc aiso 
important synthetic textile plant sites. <^^ 
t duPont's Orion factory at Camden, S. C. i&J 



Sections of Carolinas served by WBTW 

becoming 

Scene is a 





Within WBTW primary, two counties alone last year 
grossed over $50-million from tobacco. Here's a 
typical auction at Mullins, S. C.'s No. 1 tobac mkt 





Seaboard is building a SI 0,000,000 service center 
at Hamlet, N. C, including diesel repair shop and 
vast transfer yards. Will employ over 2,500. 



INDUSTRY ZOOMS WITHIN WBTW AREA 

Balancing economy in section where gross farm income ranks 
among highest in nation; factory products diversified 



The economy of the area served by 
WBTW has richly benefited from the 
expansion of industry in the Carolinas 
the past seven years. 

Agriculture is still predominant in 
the eastern Carolinas hut the spread 
of industry has been of such propor- 
tions as to create the sort of balanced 
economy that national advertisers 
favor. 

A substantial portion of the many 
millions of dollars invested in new 
Carolina plants was channeled into 
eastern South Carolina, of which Flor- 
ence is the hub. This burgeoning in- 
dustry is of a decidedly diversified 
character and includes textile-process- 
ing both natural and synthetic — 
lumber products, paper products, elec- 
tronics, clothing, rugs and minerals. 

Reducing the area's industrialization 
story to specifics, here's a thumbnail 
sketch ol what's going on industry- 
wise in some of the many communi- 
ties thai .in- clustered within a 65-mile 
radius of \\ BTW: 

Bennettsville: a booming center for 
textile ami furniture plants. 

Darlington: Buzzing with textile. 
paper ami furniture manufacturing. 

I 'ill' hi : I amed I H xiana cotton mills 
and wood products factories stabilize 
communit] . 



Georgetown: International Paper. 
lumber and chemical plants carry 
thousands on their payrolls. 

Florence: Rail and trucking focal 
point. Major employment in wood 
products and clothing. 

Hartsville: Sonoco Paper Products 
mills the largest of many diversified 
industries. 

Lumberton: Expanding lumber and 
cotton factories has this town hum- 
ming. 

The agricultural econom) within 
W BTW s coverage area ranks among 
the richest in the nation. Following 
are some facts about that cconoim : 

1. The 26 counties served 1>\ WBTW 
had in 1953 a gross farm income of 
$334,629,000. 

2. Horry Countx. which in L953 
rated as one of the country's top farm 
producers (with a gross of $33,786,- 
000), sold its tobacco crop that year 
for over $25,000,000. Florence Coun- 
ty, with a gross farm income ol $29,- 

260,000, took in about $15,000,000 

from tobacco. 

3. While tobacco is the WBTW 
an-a s No. I mone) crop topping 
Maine and Rhode Island's combined 
farm income in L953 and cotton runs 
second, the li\ e -lock ami dairj indus- 
tries are making big headway . 



Manufacturers of lumber products have plants dotted 

Sail over this area, including prefabricated housing. 
v, typified by the American Co. at Lumberton, N. C. 



UJBTV UJBTUJ 



CHARLOTTE FLORENCE SC 



MARKET 



UwdijXripTwto Oyj '\ (Jmn«t wM 



MARKET 



l"T»P ro 



QtiiKi 



BLANKETS OVER 50% OF ALL PEOPLE IN CAROLINAS 



By using the \\ BTV and \\ BTW markets in combination 
the advertiser creates for himself a potential TV coverage 
that gives him more than one out of every two people 
living in North and South Carolina. 

In combination \\ BTV and WBTW deliver a buying 
power of well over S3 1 ., billion, which is close to 54% 
of the net effective income for the Carolinas. 

Retail sales for the W'BTV and WBTW coverage areas 



total close to >L" ■_• billion, which is 53$ of the retail sales 
credited to all of North and South Carolina for 1953. 

The Piedmont Carolinas (with Charlotte as the hub) 
and the Pee Dee area (centered around Florence i are in 
the midst of a dynamic economy, with population and in- 
come skyrocketing. WBT\ and WBTW blanket not only 
these two areas but service a vast portion of the also pros- 
perous Carolina Low Country. 



\ e • « « i i. V '""""'— r- 

«A ?»»T»ie«\ » I « » ' , ■ iTTtWN 

VIRGINI A < i 

NORTH CAROLINA 



FLORENCE'S <WBTW) PRIMARY 

COVERAGE TOPS THESE MAJOR 

TELEVISION MARKETS 




CHARLOTTE 

2. ATLANTA 

EW ORLEANS 

iilRMINCHAM 

. RICHMOND 

■I CITY I 75 MILES EXCLUSIVE OF CITY ABBA 

Its 139.300 -f 1.011.800.— 2. City 333.500 + 1,416.800.— 3. CitJ 

.00 -f. 1,311.300.-4. City 328.400 -f 1.331.000.— 5. Cm 

237.300 + 1,128.600. 

SOURCE: 1050 Census 



\ c o i I c t o a I, '- 
\ 



WBTV UJBTUJ 



CHARLOTTE FLORENCE SC 



MARKETS 




MARKETS 



llepTowfv 



Basic market data on IVBTV and IVBTJV coverage areas 



COUNTIES 



POPULATION 



FAMILIES 



NET EFFECTIVE 

BUYING INCOME 



RETAIL SALES 



FOOD SALES GENERAL MDSE 



AUTO SALES DRUG SALES 



MKTV. CHARLOTTE. COVERAGE AREA 



1.1; viii "A" & "B" 

ALEXANDER, N. C. 15,000 3,600 $11,112,000 $6,375,000 $1,370,000 $692,000 $2,182,000 

ALLECHANY, N. C. 8,100 2,100 5,577,000 2,921,000 452,000 514, D00 308,000 

ANSON. N. C. 26,600 6,300 18,424,000 14,275,000 3.057,000 1,715, 000 4.768,000 

AVERY N C 13 400 3.200 8,307,003 3,796,000 1,018,000 716,000 242,000 

BURKE, N. C. 48.600 11.500 44,279,000 21,094,000 4,802,000 1,778,000 4,774,000 

CABARRUS N. C. 66 200 17,500 84,087.000 60,390,000 16,799,000 3,446,000 12,509,000 

CALDWELL, N. C. 46 400 11,200 43,159.000 25.442,000 7,454,000 1,961.000 6.776,000 

CATAWBA N. C. 66 200 17,500 77,919,000 54,120,000 12,626,000 5.519.000 14,351,000 

CHEROKEE S. C. 35.300 8.700 32,655.000 19,051,000 5,320,000 1,997,000 3.184,000 

CHESTER S C. 32 500 8,200 32,281.000 21,529,000 6,839,000 2,049,000 4,067,000 

CLEVELAND N. C. 67 000 16,500 67,548.000 44.064,000 9,923,000 7,462,000 9,763,000 

DAVIDSON N. C. 66 200 17,100 74,328,000 47,736,000 11,340,000 3,487,000 11,086,000 

DAVIE N. C. 15 800 4,000 15,917,000 6,880,000 1,661,000 781.000 1,635,000 

fairfield, s. c. 21,200 4,900 16,085,000 9,202,000 2,271,000 2,268.000 1,879,000 

forsyth n c. 158,800 44,000 231,746.000 128.940,000 27,132,000 17,407,000 25,531.000 

gaston. n. c. 121.300 31.200 150,856,000 87,298,000 23,137,000 7.955,000 20,463,000 

greenville s. c. 178,000 49.600 258,496,000 176,384,000 37,269,000 22,236,000 42,120,000 

henderson n c. 32,900 9300 33,311,000 25,670,000 6,195,000 2,098,000 5,186.000 

iredell n. c. 58.500 15,400 60,249,000 43,497,000 11,130,000 4,365,000 10,395.000 

•lancaster, s. c. 38 100 9,200 40.486,000 27,787,000 7,196,000 3.633,000 6,896,000 

laurens. s. c. 47,900 1 1 .900 52,025,000 27,502,000 7,578,000 2,803,000 5.574,000 

lincoln, n. c. 28 400 7 .000 24,125.000 17,027,000 3,607,000 1,881,000 4.848,000 

Mcdowell, n. c. 27200 6.700 26,276.000 15,403,000 4,132,000 1,614,000 3,272,000 

mfcklenburc, n. c. 216 400 59,000 364,307,006 261.722,000 49,296,000 36,855,000 53,382,000 

mitchell n c. 15 000 3,600 9,737,000 6,243,000 1,101,000 1,304,000 1,846,000 

•montgomery n c. 17 800 4,400 14,647,000 10,979,000 2,956,000 926,000 3,604,000 

POLK N C 11800 3,200 11,222,000 5.508,000 2,030,000 150,000 911,000 

ROWAN. N. C. 78300 21,300 101,271,000 57,240,000 15.244,000 5,896,000 13,298,000 

RUTHERFORD, N C 46,700 12,000 41,133,000 30,629,000 7,144,000 4,655.000 7.295.000 

SPARTANBURG. S. C. 154,200 40,900 186,463,000 137,663.000 31.277.00L 17,017.000 32.308,000 

STANLY, N. C. 39,300 10,800 43,459,300 27,178,000 6,188,000 2,436,000 5,670,000 

SURRY, N. C. 47.600 12,000 48,510,000 37,224,000 7,274,000 4,821,000 8,202,000 

UNION, S. C, 31,200 7,700 31,352,000 18,147,000 5,502,030 2,297,000 3,210,000 

UNION. N. C. 43,700 10,700 36,744,000 33,103,000 5,799,000 3,208,000 11,912,000 

WATAUGA, N. C. 18,500 4,300 11,002,000 7,522,000 2,101,000 350,000 2.085.000 

WILKES. N. C. 46,600 11,200 32,669,000 23,297,000 4,201,000 1,672,000 6,996.000 

YADKIN, N. C. 23,000 5,700 18,639,000 7,360,000 1,465,000 504,000 2,341,000 

YANCEY, N. C. 16,200 3,703 9,335.000 5,834,000 1,046,030 728.000 696,000 

YORK, S. C. 76,000 18,700 90,466,000 62,820,000 16,501,000 6,199,000 11,429,000 

GRADE "A" &. "B" TOTALS 2.101,800 



$102,000 

49,000 

358,000 

102,000 

570,000 

1,782,000 
665.000 

1,220,000 
465.000 
545.000 
869,000 
974,000 
234,000 
254,000 

3.883,000 

2.517.000 

5,059,000 
718,000 

1,177,000 
737,000 
758,000 
100.000 
564,000 

7,024,000 

139,000 

200,000 

91,000 

1.861.000 
881,000 

3,150,000 
684.000 

1,186,000 
637,000 
646,000 
291,000 
550,000 
81,000 
60,000 

1,525,000 



516,200 82, ll.il.llll I. (Kill 



1 .618,852.000 



,433,000 



I 02. 395, OOO 



S367.491.00O 



I42.708.O0O 



Plut HID u, m 

ASHE, N C. 
BUNCOMBE, N. C. 
CHESTERFIELD, S C. 


22,100 

128,700 

36,200 


5.200 

35.000 

8,300 

7,700 

8,500 

10,400 

14,200 

10,400 

3,900 


$12,298,000 
163.^26,000 
24,303,000 
25,595,000 
32,184,000 
41,832,000 
57,544,000 
46,644,000 
14,738.000 


$7,042,000 
116,440.000 
20,937,000 
18,061,000 
23,629,000 
22,372,000 
36,380,000 
35,099,000 
9,991,900 


$1,308,000 
24,225.000 
4,484,000 
5.306,000 
6,286,000 
7,068,000 
3,362,000 
10,107,000 
2,361,000 


$816 000 
17,199,000 
2,082,000 
2,188,000 
2,632,000 
1,700,000 
3,665,000 
4,134,000 
442,000 


$1,794,000 
21,878,000 
6,031.000 
4.204,000 
5,015.000 
4.192,000 
9,656.000 
7.315,000 
1,848,000 


$105,000 

4,121,000 

621,000 


•KERSHAW, S. C. 
NEWBERRY, S. C. 
PICKENS, S. C. 
RANDOLPH, N. C. 

RICHMOND, N. C. 
TRANSYLVANIA, N. C. 


32,000 
32,400 
40,000 
53,400 
40,800 
16,300 


478,000 
745.000 
733,000 
1,013,000 
755.000 
350,000 


WBTV GRAND TOTALS ... 


? 503 700 


649,800 82.879.508.000 $1,908,803,000 

WBTW, FLORENCE, S. 

6,300 $18,424,000 $14,275,000 
8,300 24,303,000 20,937,000 
6,700 17,165,'jOO 11,107,000 

12,200 39,858,000 33,598.000 

12,400 43,174,003 33,955.000 
6,800 21,452.000 11,070.000 

20,300 70.035,000 6/, 673, 000 
3,400 9,028,000 6,030,000 

14,100 49,516,000 39,134,000 
7,700 25,595,000 18,061,000 
4,000 11.230,000 7,527,000 
7,900 24,348,000 21.486,000 
7,100 19,669,000 17,432,000 

10,400 46,644,000 35,099.000 

20,300 68,607,000 58.357,000 
6.300 19,817.000 17,348,000 

14,400 51.400.000 38.316.000 
9.300 22.980,000 20,468,000 


8440,940,000 8227,653,000 8429,427,000 

C. COVERAGE AREA 

$3,057,000 $1,715,000 $4,768,00C 
4,484,000 2,082,000 6,031.000 
2,724.000 1,794,000 3.202,000 
6,542.000 4.022.000 9,643,000 
8,939,000 5.672,000 6.493.000 
4,401.000 1,522,000 3,534,000 

15,532,000 8.933, u o 14.180.000 
1.485.000 523.000 835,000 
3.456,000 6,212,000 8.807.000 
5.306,000 2,188,000 4.204,000 
2,274,000 983.000 1.338,000 
4.841,000 2.730,000 3.409,000 
4.715,000 2,721,000 2,281.000 

10,107,000 4.134,000 7,315,000 

11,075,000 11,682,000 12,931,000 
3,932,000 3,135.000 2.993,000 
9,523.000 6,236.000 7.541.000 
5.111,000 2,370,000 5.132,00 




(.11 VDE "A" & "B" 

•ANSON, N. C. 

•CHESTERFIELD. S. C. 

CLARENDON, S. C. 

COLUMBUS, N. C. 


26,603 
36,200 
32,400 
52,700 


$358,000 
621 000 
309,000 
909,000 


DARLINCTON, S. C. 
DILLON. S. C. 


51,500 
31,100 


790,000 

436,000 

1 500 000 


FLORENCE, S. C. 


83,500 
16,100 


HOKE N. C. 


94.000 

1,369,000 

478,000 

282.000 

742.000 

441.000 

755.000 

1,611,000 

367,000 

1 ,066,000 

419,000 


HORRY, S. C. 

KERSHAW, S. C. 
LEE, S. C. 
MARION, S. C. 
MARLBORO, S. C. 

RICHMOND, N. C. 


62,300 
32.000 
22,700 
34,200 
30,900 
40 800 


ROBESON, N. C. 


92,600 


SCOTLAND, N. C. 
SUMTER, S. C. 
WILLIAMSBURC, S. C. 


27.500 
61,000 
44,800 



GRADE A'' «. 'B" TOTALS 



583,2 15, OOO 



$178.37.1.000 



1 1 I 2,50 I. ooo 



■ lo (,637,000 



$12.5 17. OOO 



riu 



IIHI ut m 



BLADEN. N. C. 
CALHOUN, S. C. 
CUMBERLAND, N. 
GEORGETOWN, S. 

LANCASTER, S. C 
-MONTGOMERY, N. C. 
MOORE, N. C. 
'UNION, N. C. 



C. 

c. 



30,600 
14,500 
115,900 
33,400 
38,100 
17,800 
33,800 
43,700 



6.800 


$19,811,000 


$14,463,000 


3,400 


8,428,000 


4,720,000 


24,100 


158.747,000 


37,399,000 


7,900 


28,139,000 


20,291,000 


9,200 


40.486,000 


27.787,000 


4,400 


14,647.000 


10.979,000 


8,600 


33,296,000 


25.822,000 


10,700 


36.744,000 


33,103,000 



$3,365,000 
1.402.000 

18,347.000 
6,038,000 
7.196.000 
2.956 000 
6,257.000 
5,799.000 



$2,762,000 

661.000 

12.541,000 

1,514,000 

3,633,000 

926,000 

1,886.000 

3,208.000 



$4,991,000 
1.184,000 

19.494.000 
5,395.000 
6,896.000 
3.604.000 
4.525.000 

11,912.000 



$319,000 
142.000 

2,363.000 
640,000 
737.000 
200.000 
807.000 
646,000 



WBTW GRAND TOTAI S 


1 . 106,700 


2r. 1 


200 


.^'i-M .r, li OOO 


8702,937,000 


8 1 63,86 


.ooo 


895,785,000 


9 162,638,000 


1 1 a. KM .ooo 


•7-COUNTY DUPLICATED TOTAL 


235,200 


.-.7 


ooo 


8206,8 13,000 


1 160,2 1 1 .ooo 


838,90! 


,000 


1 1 7,886,000 


81 1,730,000 


83,795,000 


WBTV WBTW UNDUPLICATED 
COMBINED TOTALS 


3,375,200 


;i it 


ooo 


1 1,596,268,000 


82, 151, 199.000 


8565,89' 




I 105,552,000 


85 17,335,000 


866. 2.15, 0(M) 



bOUHOl. . 



. 



[lzod ] '"i Heated coudI Li i 



SUCCESS STORIES 



IBTV 

S2 " h H " ,o,, « 



PROMOTION 



WBTV'S SALES EFFECTIVENESS CONSISTENT 

Few things are as rewarding to a station's management and staff as when 
an advertiser writes: "Yours was the loin's/ cost pei order we hare hail on 
any to station we have used." This theme has ran through hosts of let/eis 
that hare come to H BTl during the past lire years anil the people of 
Jefferson Standard Broadcasting are confident that advertisers will he 
shortly saying the same gratifying things about WBTW. 

Here tire a tew samples ot WBTV success stories: 



Southern Appliances: Clyde .McLean, 
the "Weatherman," with a smoked turkey 
a- prize, asked viewers to guess what the 
temperature was at the Charlotte airport 
that day. In three days there were 5,606 
letters and cards, for a total of about 
15. 1)00 in three weeks. 



Hickory Auto Parts. Inc.: 1'nion Oil 
Co. (if California reported to this distrib- 
Utor, which used WBTV exclusively for 
it- advertising, that over period of a year 
Hickory topped all distributors in the 
country in the increased sales of Royal 
Triton Motor Oil. Hickory's increase was 
102%. 



Orderest Mattress: \- direct result of a 
fevi -put-, sales not only boomed with es- 
tablished dealers but three new dealers 
were added in Charlotte and two other 
dealers in the WBTV coverage area ap- 
plied for franchises all in one week. 



Baby Butler: Boettiger & Summers, agen- 
cy for regional distributor of this juvenile 
furniture, wrote that client "received so 
many leads from his two spots per week 
on WBTV that his salesmen have more 
business than the) can handle." and hence 



was forced to halt furthei advertising un- 
til thej caught up. Sold 98$ of inquiries. 

Coca-Cola: Viewers wen- offered a cow- 
bo) handkerchief for a coupon attached 
to six-bottle carton of Coke plus 25c on 
kit Carson Show. Response was average 
over 1,300 quarters per uk. for 13 wks. 

Mars, Inc.: Sponsors "Story Painter" 
with Gil Stamper. On recent idler of 
three ball-pens over WBTV, agenc) re- 
ported: "^ • show ha- dime outstanding 

job tm ii- . . . offer pulled over 7.500 re- 
turns . . . proportionately better than 
I'm. -inn. I ii- Angeles or Providence . . . 
the other place- where offer was made." 

Tube Rose Snuff: Arthur Smith and his 
Crackerjacks Show in two announcements 
totalling a minute offered hand fans with 
ri plica i if Tube Rose can made of card- 
board. \\ I!T\ received requests for over 
50,000 of these fans. 

Belli Stores: When this client terminat- 
ed Gene Autry tv film series after six 
month-' run \VBT\ asked viewers on 
final show whether they'd like series con- 
tinued. Response: 2.790 pieces of mail 
(some lengthy petitions) and 229 com- 
pleted phone calls. 



Merchandising that is tailored iiif/fiiioiivJi/ to client's needs 



HIS BIACKCA1 MfANS 
COOD LUCK F 



I 



uibtv-s 

««■ «/ 




WBTV 

&uumt£3 

CI MIOTIC. I. (. 



. jEWtl SH0RUNINQ 



lou 



Xf OF 
VOL'S NEW EMPLOYES 
ON THf SACK 

what fMPio.r 

'Hf ONE SEUING i_ 

OVElo 



OF COURSE' 




11:00 P. M. NEWS 



with Jirn Patterson 



SOILAX 



-Add life- 
Fridays at 11 p. m. 




WBTV SPARKLES WITH 
ALL-AROUND PROMOTION 

\ prime tenet in the Jefferson 
Stand. ml Broadcasting's system of op- 
eration is that an advertiser should 
receive the support of a many-faceted 
and up-to-date promotion department. 
Also, that each project undertaken l>\ 
this department should be tailored to 
the special needs of each client and 
the product. 

In Charlotte, alone, the extensive 
promotion operation includes the ser- 
vices of Hi people, who work under 
ihe supervision of .1. Robert Coving- 
ton, vice president in charge of sales 
and promotion. 

The department's responsibilities 
include sales promotion, merchandis- 
ing, audience promotion, research and 
publicity. 

In merchandising, the department 
is equipped to furnish letters and elab- 
orate color jumbo card mailings to re- 
tailers, counter cards, stuffers, win- 
dow streamers, shelf talkers and vari- 
ous other types of point-of-sale promo- 
tion. The class and amount of mer- 
chandising is determined by the gross 
expenditure of the advertiser. 

WBTV's qualit) audience promo- 
tion — reflected in the station's ex- 
tremely high ratings receives a ma- 
jor portion of the department's budget 
and attention. 

Publicity-wise, 111 newspapers in 
the W'BTA area devote am where from 
three columns to two full pages to 
stories, pictures and schedules of that 
station. In addition, a striking total 
of 67 newspapers run the \\BI\ pro- 
gram schedule. 

Other audience promotion includes 
newspaper ads, movie trailers, hill- 
boards and window displays. 

\ full-time research director coor- 
dinates data from authoritative na- 
tional and regional research and rating 
services including set count. 

Although \\ l!T\\ has its own pro- 
motion department, \\ BT\ promotion 
staffers are also utilized to help the 
Florence outlet maintain the unusual!) 
high promotion standards ol the 
company . 



PROGRAMING 





/. Unusual and unpredictable, "/links/age 
Studio" has an enviable daytime record 

2. Susie Mclntyre's "Carolina Cookery" is 
No. 2-ranked cooking show in nation 

.'{. "Junioi Rancho," with Fred Kirby, pulls 

2_'-2."> ratings and perks sales for sponsors 

I. "Man {round the House," </itiz, fashions, 
et( .. is (iiin!il\ matinee entertainment 

.». The Arthur Smith troupe's theatre ilati s 
are as sensational as its television ratings 



"COMMUNITY SERVICE" IS NOT JUST 
"LIP SERVICE" WITH WBTV: IT'S REAL 



\\ 111 V. like its sister outlet, WBT, 
has been much kudoed as one of the 
great qualit) stations of the nation. 

Among tin- things thai have con- 
tributed to this accolade are these: 

1 . \\ I! I A - strict adherence to the 
■ Kilo that a station exists to serve the 
communit) . 

2. \ programing structure of local 
origin thai not onl) keep- this obliga- 
tion in mind hut caters to the di- 
versified tastes of tin* people in the 
communit) . 

3. Maintaining a standard of local 
production thai i- on a par with the 
finest in national telecasting. 

I. I he i reating oi program con- 
cepts and developmenl of talent thai 
widened into national recognition. 

\\ Pi I \ backs up the awareness of 
ilk obligation to the community l>\ the 



quantity and quality of the live shows 
it turns out weekly and the judicious 
choice of network programing. 

WBTV's local programing provides 
for every cultural level. Regardless ol 
the typo of program homemaking, 
news, audience participation, country 
music or serious music the elements 
ol showmanship and qualit) of pres- 
entation are such as to assure wide 
regional appeal and esteem. 

rypical of thai esteem is this quote 
from a letter l>\ Don Shoemaker, edi- 
tor of the \-he\ ille ( jli/en. alioiit a 

\\ I! I \ -produced ( Ihristmas show : 

"Wherever the kudo-, land. 1 just 
want to sa) the production was ter- 
rific The usual phrase i-. this was 
'of network quality,' hut what network 

could have duplicated it? M\ wife ami 

I sal enhanced." 




WBTV's Stalwarts of Information 

"Your Esso Reporter" and "The Weatherman," 
back-to-hack five evenings a week, serve as 
crack examples of the station's touch for in- 
vesting each show with the best in production 



PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS 



WBTV'S OWN SHOWS 
LEAD RATING PARADE 



WBTl has been consistently and 
conspicuously successful in the num- 
ber of local live shows sold to national 
advertisers. The reason is three fold: 
(1) They bear the unmistakable stamp 
of quality plus prestige. (2) Most of 
them can match ratings with top net- 
work shows. (3) They produce su- 
perior sales results. Here are a few 
samples from WBTV's roster of lo- 
cally produced programs: 

Arthur Smith ami his Crtteker- 

jacfes: A troupe of folk music enter- 
tainers who not only excel as instru- 
mentalists and singers but as top-rank 
comedians. An inkling of why thev've 
had a waiting list of sponsors for a 
long time: the act's Tuesday night 
program had a Pulse November 1954 
rating of 49.8. 

Doing It Yourself: A sprightly and 
cleverly devised charade on the self- 
ingenuity and hobby themes, with 
Alan Newcomb and the beautiful and 
resourceful Cath) Haines presiding. 
The November Pulse was 39. 

Esso Reporter: He's Doug Mayes, 
a Carolina-bred personality, whose 
stvle of delivery has gained him recog- 
nition as one of the most popular 
newsmen in both Carolinas. Novem- 
ber Pulse: 35.6. 

The Weatherman: Comes at 6:45 
p.m. Clvde McLean's authoritative 

and instructive handling of his data 
combined with top-notch production 
I sec picture on opposite page I makes 
this item a model of its genre. It 
turned in a 35.2 November Pulse. 

Story fainter: Gil Stamper is the 
story-teller for an audience that seems 
to be of even age group, though the 
show comes at 5:15. The Imaginative 
sketches that accompany his narrative 
are preth much of a show in them- 
selves. The November ratings was 21.5. 



PROGRAMING 




PROGRAMING 



(TepTiurtX/ 



WBTW GEARS PROGRAMS TO ENTIRE AREA 



\\ BTW's programing stall' are grad- 
uates of WBTV. the oldest and most 
experienced station in the Carolinas. 

This staff brought with it to WBTW 
not only a sharply precisioned know- 
how but a philosophy of operation; 
namely, that the greatness of an area 
station is measured by the way it 
serves the diversified needs of all the 
(•(immunities that come within the sta- 
tion's orbit. 

While WBTW is making every ef- 
fort to give balance to its program 
structure, the staffs thinking and plan- 
ning has been conditioned to the fact 
that WBTW is not a metropolitan sta- 
tion but rather an area station. 

\\ BTW serves a number of large 
and small cities throughout a 26- 
county area extending into and over 
the two Carolinas — an area which, 
though predominantly agricultural, is 
undergoing rapid and sizeable indus- 
trialization. It recognizes that even 
the towns people and those in the ex- 
panding industrial areas are largely 
dependent on the farm population. 

With these factors in mind. WBTW 
has geared its programing to a diversi- 
fied population over a wide area and 
in its local live programing aims to 
serve the needs of a people spread 
over 26 counties. 

For example, on such programs as 



"Southeast Almanac, ' a farm show 
headed l>\ Charles G. Newton. Jr.. and 
''Editorial Page, a panel discussion by 
newspaper editors, the guests will in- 
clude farm agents, agricultural spe- 
cialists and newspaper editors from 
throughout the area and not jusc 
\\ B I \\ "s home city of Florence. 

"Southeast Vlmanac" is the station's 
lop locally produced show and WB'I \\ 
considers itself fortunate in having 
obtained the full cooperation of Clem- 
son College Extension Service in pro- 
viding information and personalities 
for the show. 

WBTW regards "Southern Hospi- 
tality'' as another of its elite local live 
programs. This show's format pro- 
vides for both kitchen and livingroom 
sets and a broad range of interests and 
themes: recipes, homemaking tips, 
fashions, interviews and film clips on 
topical area events and whatnot. JoAnn 
Hodge comes handsomely equipped 
for the versatile roles the program en- 
tails. For vears she served as Home 
Demonstration Club Agent in North 
Carolina and as home economist for 
the Carolina Power & Light Co. in 
Florence. 

WBTW's No. 1 daily live public 
service feature is "Lift Up Thine 
Eyes," a vespers program that is 
scheduled in choice time. 



Good cooking ami progressive farming are major interests in the ITRTIF area. These 
interests are expertly satisfied by "Southern Hospitality," starring JoAnn Hodge, 
iiml "Southeast Almanac" conducted by Charles G. Newton, Jr. (interviewing farmer) 




PERSONALITIES- 




WXk 



THEY TYPIFY WBTV'S REPUTE FOR TOP-NOTCH TALENT 



Phil 
\gresta 

A top sports per- 
sonality in the 
Carolinas; also 

very apt at news, 

special events, 

panel programs 



Fletcher 

Austin 

Top-flight m.c. 
with any type of 

Inch shot: hi: 

background: slum 

hiz and radio 



Bob 

it <-ii it 

A real pro and 
wit on variety 

and in ten ten 
slums; pails 
lots of grass- 
roots sin I \ 



Betty 

Feezoti 

She I nmi s hou 

to injet i rare 

touch smartness 

and showmanship 

into any 

homemah 1 1 sAi u 



l>«»rri.v 
llualfr 

I hi i harm and 

arm iousness 

blend per (ei il\ 

into "The Man 

Around the 

linn i shou 






Cathy 
Haines 

Combines a ver- 
satile talent 
for emceeing 
women programs 
with flair for 
salesmanship 



Fret! 
Kirbtf 

Sl i ii rnmed folk 
music on many 
top radio sta- 
tions lie/ore lie 
registered hig 
with youngsters 



Susie 
iff cl ii t y re 

Developed her 

a hi m chatty 

style of recipe 

demonstration as 

travelling rep 

lor pmeer company 



Man 
ISeweonta 

His mastery of 

the ad /Hi in 

radio, aplomb. 

gave him solid 

pan nt plops 
for ti m.e.ing 



(ill 

Stamper 

Fits pally into 
mi t 111 .1 . role 

panel, musit 01 

liilllii/h : stars 
also iis story- 

teller to llliippi Is 








Clyde 
McLean 

Although handy as 
music commenta- 
tor, he's best 
I. noun to area 
ior his daily 
"II eatherman" 



Doug 
Mayes 

A until e hi 
Tennessee who's 

made his mark 
as a top news 
announcer in 

the Carolinas 



Jim 
Patterson 

I eleinn lien s- 

man with W BTl . 

holding late 

night spot, and 

n smooth salesman 



Boh 

Kuilin <l 

Suave, easy- 
going and an 

ingratiating 
pun litionei 

of the ad-lib 

nit/i pop music 



William 1. 
Ward 

Kuril, ed high as 

spot Is onnoiiin ci 

around the 

( hi oli uas and 

has "tin" gift 

tor interviewing 




I 







^PUBLIC SERVICE 



MATURE 
MUSEUM * 






Many kudos have been accorded this 28-32 rating weekly stanza, now in its third year 



PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAMS WITH STATURE 



n 



Dr. George Heaton 



WBTV has car- 
ried on the dis- 
tinguished record 
for public serv- 
ice that has been 
^^^^^00^^ associated with 

f^^\ fi| ^ BT the |>ast 30 
years. It has rec- 
ognized its soc ial 
responsibilities as a great area station 
b) providing not onlj its facilities 
ltut guidance and fiscal help. 

\\ BT\ lias geared its sense of re- 
sponsibility to a unique policy and 
pattern of action. In manner of think- 
ing or planning there arc no lines <>l 
distinction between commercial and 
public service programing. The level 
of production and expense is as high 
for one as the other. Bui what is even 
more noteworth) is this: most of 
\\ BT\ *s public service programs are 
spotted in valuable prime station time. 
Here are a few examples of how 
WBTV treats its public service debt: 
1. WBTV won't sell time for re- 
ligious broadcasts but it does recog- 
nize the strong religious consciousness 
of the people within its area. It long 
ago set aside as a permanent "must" 
10 minutes of highly saleable earl) 
evening time. Monday through Friday, 
for a religious message — "Vespers"- 
with the periods allocated among min- 
isters of different faiths. In addition, 
there's a weeklv inspirational series 
conducted bv the station's religious 
< ounselor. Dr. George Heaton. 



2. During political campaigns it sets 
aside prime evening time, entirelv 
gratis, for opposing candidates to con- 
dur I debates. 

3. WBTV devoted around $50,000 
worth of prime time to its "Conserva- 
tion Story" series, produced in coop- 
eration with state authorities. 

4. Scheduled in mid-evening time 
are two 13-week series of half-hour se- 
rious music programs, featuring mem- 
bers of the Charlotte Symphon) or- 
chestra. 

Examples of other public service 
programs that WBTV is trulv proud 
o| are "Communit) Affair" and "Na- 
ture Museum." Both shows have rat- 
ings in the 2d s. "Communit) Affair" 
is boundless in scope and format. One 
week it ma) bring representative citi- 
zens together for discussion of a topi- 
cal municipal problem and the next 
week, join the local dailies in celebrat- 
ing newspaper week by putting on a 
\\ BTV-ftlmed documentar) showing 
how these dailies put out an issue. 
Laura Owens, director of Charlotte s 
Nature Museum, conducts the other 
program and her mail pull is excep- 
tionally and consistently big. 

The following excerpt from a letter 
apl) reflects how community leaders 
feel toward WBTV on this subject: 

"I have been amazed at the amount 
of time your station and its people 
have been willing to give to public 
service. . . . Another thing that amazes 
me is how willing vou give it! 



PERSONALITIES 




PERSONALITK 



n*v 





WBTW'S STAR NUCLEUS 



Charles C». 
X etc ton, Jr. 

II I IT II farm 
editoi >v/ asst. 
count) agt ni . 

sei 1 i'il I ,S. abroad 

as agrii ultural 
field rep 



Jo Ann 
Hodge 

II iih emphasis 
on cooking, she 

M7 1 ed us home 
economist foi 

( milium I'ou i i 

Go. in Vim i in e 



Charlie 
Mitchell 

Unit eight yrs. 

nilli top stations 

II UK, ami II I'll-: 

avocation : acting 

in Little Theatres 



.Jim 
Playvr 

t a ic-minded, 
five-yeai vet- 
eran in broad- 
i asting; former 

II IIH staffer 



Dicle 
Taylor 

Did jack-oj-all- 

trades nnnoum ing 

on < arolina sta- 
tions, including 
II SJS-TV, 

II hi stun Salem 








UJBTV UJBTU) 

CHARLOTTE FLORENCE »C 







OSEPH M. BRYAN CHARLES H. CRUTCHFIELD 

'resident o£ Jefferson Stand- Executive vice president and 

ini Broadcasting Co. ; purchased seneral manager; 25 years in 
VBT in 1945; pioneered in "a radio; 22 rears with 

iith WBTV in '49 WBT; general mer since 194! 



I ROBERT COVINGTON 

\ ice president in charge of 
& promotion ; developed 
^ p departments to among na- 
tion's finest in 8 yrs. with co. 



KENNETH 1. TREDWELL, JR. 
V.p. in charge of programs 
and public relations; ranked 
i- leader in local live 
opment 



C. KENNETH SPICER 
Controller and as 

ry; authority on 
station financing and 
accounting managemeut 




THOMAS B HOWARD 
Engineer- 
ing : 28 yrs. in field : 

ling "ii ,i SBC's 
n -ion & development 



WALLACE |. IORCENSON 

General sales mans 
11 yrs. in broadcasting; 
has keen understanding 
ad ertisers' problems 



M |- MINOR 
l !. . I engineer : here 
23 years : supervised 
technical installations 
of WBTV & WBTW 



PAUL B. MARION 

WBTV sa'es manager 
in radio, tv seven yrs; 
previously supervised 
WBT & WBTV promotion 



|. WILLIAM QUINN 

WBTW managing director; 
eight yrs. in radio, tv; 
promoted here from WBTV's 
program supervisor 



LACY S. SELLARS 

WBTV program » 1 1 - ■ toi 
upped from film room 
supervisor: former 
professor of pi 



SAMUEL C. ZURICH 

WBTV productioi 
pervisor; spent 
in radio 



|OHN P DILLON 

Promotion super 

visor; advertisers 

like his creative 

.s and follow tlirn 



CHARLES B. SEWARD 

WBTV film editor 

ind in pro 

din in- do- inn" 

tional films 



|ACK BURNEY 

■ i tor ; 

1 1 it. i 

tact 



N BURGESS. |R. 

Puhlicit) din 
«ra< I i bbcr 

with Will 
in ari ■ per* 








WBTV-TRAINED STAFF BRINGS 
WEALTH OF SAVVY TO WBTW 



Referring to a television station as "a chip off the old 
block" may sound odd, but in the case of WBTW the phrase 
(its like the proverbial glove. 

\ I Hint the only thing new in connection with WBTW 1 
going <m the air was its equipment and facilities. Everything 
else bore the mark of full-grown maturity. 

Both management and staff came WBTV-trained ami experi- 
enced, bringing with them an operational pattern that has 
gained WBTV countrywide recognition as among the best. 

\\ 111. forerunner to WBTV and WBTW. i~ both the pioneer 
station <>f the South and the third oldot station in the nation. 
W BT\ was the first l\ operation in the Carolinas, going on 
the air commercially in mid-Julv. 1049. 

WBTW started off with an audience <>f 100,000 set-owning 
families. It> new building in Florence i- but a smaller edition 
<>l the 18.000-foot showplace that now houses WBT\ and 
WBT. Basicall) CBS, WBTV and WBTW are affiliated with 
all four networks. 







«H 



\iitniiiiil Miles representati 



ves CBS TELEVISION SPOT SALES 




NEWYORK CHICAGO DETROIT LOSANGELES SAN FRANCISCO ATLANTA 



re \ son I HI SENTA1 IONS INC ill Ii 

v, D i '■ IVBTW Detlgncd h< 





MELVIN PURVIS 

Station mgr; 13 yrs. 
radio operation: law 
office in Flori 

formerly with FBI 



ROBERT L RIERSON 

Program and Produc 

tion din. tor; six 

j rs. « itta companj ; pp 

for \'a\\ also 



EMIL A SELLERS 

Chief engineer; ex- 
asst supervisor in 
\\ B T\ - irii 

12 yrs. in radio. t\ 



|OHN H BROCK 

Sali s manage! u pped 
from WBT\ lies stall 

i ion 
manager of WIS 



WHITEFOORD SMITH 

Promotion director ; 
w KT\ trained . I 
OP staff writer; also 
covered Bports 



HARRY B HUGHES 

Film director: was 
producer direi tot 
at WSJS-TV, W 
Salem WBTV-trained 



WKRC-TV 



316,000 watts 

on Channel 12 




CINCINNATI, OHIO 



AXIMUM POWER 




WTVN-TV 



100,000 watts 



on Channel 6 columbus, ohio 




Don Chapin Ken Church 

Mgr. New York Office, National Sales Manager 

550 Fifth Avenue 




REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 




10 JANUARY 1955 


33 




BILL BRAMHALL, one of WEMP'S fa- 
mous air salesmen, emcees two great 
shows daily. His homespun style is all 
his own, yet fits like a glove in the 
WEMP family. One thing is sure, il 
Bill says it's good, they buy it. Some of 
his national advertisers are: 

Coca-Cola, Oxydol, Omar, Simonize, 
Robert Hall, Household Finance, 
Miller Brewing Co., Halo Shampoo, 
Musterole, Howard Johnson, Blu- 
tone Fuel Oil, Nesbitt. 

WEMP delivers up to twice the Mil- 
waukee audience per dollar of Mil- 
waukee network stations.* Call Head 
ley-Reed! 

' Based on latest available Pulse 
ratings and SRDS rates. 



WEMPWEMP-FM 

MILWAUKEE 

HUGH BOICE, JR., Sen. Mgr. 
HEADLEY-REED, Natl. Rap. 

HOURS OP MUSIC. NEWS, SPORTS 




IripiiF 



r7tc*ft<f<>f J. I till itici n<« 

Advertising manager, Package Division 
Oalute Products. New York 



When Mike Cullinane, Oakite Products' ad manager of the package 
division, spins around in his swivel chair, he's within easy reach of 
six sample packages of Oakite and one portable radio. 

"And that's no coincidence," says he. "In 1954, radio was our 
major advertising medium. Over 60% of our total budget went into 
announcements, the remainder into newspapers and store-distributed 
magazines." 

Oakite's major problem: using the firms modest advertising 
appropriation effectively enough to cut down the margin between 
Oakite sales and the sales of richer competitors like Spic and Span. 

"The way to do this, we feel, is to concentrate on our best 
distribution area, concentrate on media suited to our purpose and 
concentrate on one major copy theme," Cullinane sa\s. 

The current copy theme for Oakite is "Tougb on dirt.'" but "so 
mild for your hands." This claim is in line with the firm's effort to 
attract the younger housewife. 

"The older folks in our distribution areas remember us anyhow," 
adds Cullinane. Oakite's best sales areas are the Eastern Seaboard 
and California. It is in these areas that the firm's 1954 year-'round 
radio announcement campaign was concentrated. Oakite's agenc\ is 
Calkins & Holden. 

"On 10 January we're launching a new radio announcement 
campaign in our four most important sales areas — New York, New 
England. Philadelphia and Los Angeles." 

Oakite generally uses 20- and 60-second announcements, including 
a musical jingle. In major areas and during the spring and fall 
< leaning seasons, Oakite uses up to 2(> announcements a week. In 
similar markets, the firm tends to use an average ol three to five 
announcements weekly. 

Cullinane. who got into advertising "through the backdoor —sales," 
keeps the Oakite distributors and retailers :<>nstantl\ informed of 
ihe (inn's advertising efforts, emphasizes heavj merchandising in 
the eternal fight For shelf space. 

When not attending sales meetings or directing ad strategy from 
downtown New >oik. Cullinane (.in be found in hi- Wantagh, L. I.. 

home, "puttering around." a generic term thai he says includes 
everything from building things to gardening. + * ■*■ 



31 



SPONSOR 



Storer 

Broadcasting 

Company 



announces the appointment of 




as national representative for 



WJW 

Cleveland 



* 



effective January /, 1955 



* 




IOW . . . the Pacific Northwest 
joins the Storer scene 



KPTVi Portland's first TV station and the channel 

consistently ahead in sales, takes its plan as a member of the broadcasting 
industry's best-known organization. The Storer picture has always 
been the most profitable one for advertisers. Gel the ex< iting stor) 
that goes with this picture now. Call KPTV or 
your local NBC Spoi Saks representative today. 

Oregon's MOST POWERFUL TV giant 



36 



SPONSOR 



lO JANUARY 1955 




I. Illlims KRUGMAN '>. ( (il (. \ I I S I.ABODA 



Admen pose top radio- 
li questions for 1955 

SPONSOR provides answers to questions asked 
by admen (their pietures appear at right) 




M 

W 










I l\ AS STEWART 
I 4. SIM. I R s MORTON 

,. SI I \I \Vs WINOKUR 



M he 10 questions listed at 
the right were winnowed from 
a survey of sponsor and agency 
executives, all key figures 
in the radio-tv business. Each 
adman was asked to name 
one question which he felt 
would be of outstanding con- 
cern in 1955. While more than 
10 executives were asked to 
pose a question and more than 
10 questions were asked, it 
was arbitrarily decided to 
limit the final questions to 10. 
Five of the questions are 
answered in this issue and 
the other five will be answered 
in the next issue. 



ANSWERED IN THIS ISSUE 

Are spot tv rate increases entirely justified by additional viewers 
or are they, in part, based on the long list of advertisers who seek spot 
availabilities? Lester Krugman, advertising manager, Bulova Watch Co. 

2 What's the outlook for syndicated film in 1955? George T. LaBoda 
radio and tv director, Colgate-Palmolive Co. 

3 Is there any chance that tv network advertisers will be able to add 
network radio in non-tv markets only so as to get 100% U.S. coverage 
with one network buy? Donald W. Stewart, advertising manager, The Texas Co. 

4. Are rising costs freezing out the small- and medium-sized advertiser 
from tv? H. H. Horton, director of advertising, Singer Sewing Machine Co. 

5. Do radio commercials today have the same impact as before tv? 

Samuel Winokur, vice president, Seeman Bros. 



COMING NEXT ISSUE 

A How can spot radio be made more exciting to an advertiser's sales 
force and dealers? Dr. Seymour Banks, media mgr.. Leo Burnett Co.. Chicago 

7 What one- and two-station markets of importance will receive addi- 
tional tv stations in 1955? Adolph Toigo, president, Lennen & Newell 

g_ Will there be any drastic changes in network radio operations in 
1955? Lee Mack Marshall, advertising manager, Continental Baking Co. 

9 a Will the use of network tv cut-ins be more prevalent in 1955 in order 
to assist in spreading the production cost of the network show over a 
variety of products or to underwrite new product testing in regional and 
spot markets? Donald Cady, vice president in charge of general advertising 
and merchandising manager, The Nestle Co. 

10. Will the tv network spectaculars be continued next season? Dr. 
Wallace II. Wulfeck, chairman, executive committee. \\ illiam Esrv Co. 



10 JANUARY 1955 



37 



1 



Are spot tv rate increases entirely justified by additional viewers 
or are they, in part, based on the long list of advertisers who seek spot 
availabilities? Lester Krugman, advertising manager, Bulova Watch Co. 



2. 



The methods t\ stations use to set 
spol rate- cannot be easily described. 
\- a matter of fact, main ol those fa- 
miliar with Hie subject sa\ that no two 
stations go about it the same wa) . 

I lure is. of course, a relationship 
between rates and sets in the area or 
rates and the station's audience. But, 
as in all businesses, the balance be- 
tween tlic supply of the product (tv 
time) and the demand for it is bound 
to have some effect on the price. And 
there are other factors, too. 

To get some idea of the connection 
between rates and set circulation, spon- 
sor asked Ward Dorrell, research di- 
rector of Blair Tv, to pinpoint the re- 
lationship in graphic form. (The re- 
sulting chart is shown below. I 



In explaining how he went about it. 
Dorrell said: "Obviously, there should 
be some relationship between circula- 
tion and cost per program or spot. 
I veryone concerned with buying or 
selling time would probably like to 
have a mathematical relationship to de- 
termine the cost of the bin they are 
making. 

"To show the relationship between 
rates and circulation — and by circula- 
tion I mean the number of tv sets in 
the station area, not audience as shown 
b\ syndicated audience measurement 
reports — I set up a scatter diagram. 
Tv circulation is on the vertical scale 
and the 20-second Class "A" or "AA" 
i in uncement rate is on the horizontal 
[Please turn to page 106) 



IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TV RATES, CIRCULATION? 

Chart below was made by Ward Dorrell, research director, Blair Tv, to find correlation 
between rates, tv sets in area. Each dot represents one or more of 150 mature tv stations 
covered in study, shows intersection of announcement rate, potential circulation. If rates 
varied exactly as circulation (that is, if cost-per- 1 ,000 was same for all stations), all dots 
would lie in straight line. Dispersed dots show rate vs. circulation varies, but tendency of 
the dots to cluster around the freely drawn line shows "some'' correlation, explains Dorrell 

w TV SETS IN STATION AREA 



4 000,000 



(,ooo, m 



iii.d 000 
900.000 
800,000 
700,000 
600,000 

500,000 
400.000 



I ... ..(in 













< 


» i 


1 




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/* 


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ISO 70 '10 150 300 500 700 1,000 

^ COST PER 20-SECOND ANNCT. IN "A" OR "AA" TIME 



What's the outlook for syn- 
dicated film in 1955? George T. 
LaBoda, radio and tv director. Colgate- 
Palmolive Co. 

Here are the most frequently heard 
predictions: 

• This will be a shake-out year for 
film syndicators. Most film executives 
agreed that the big syndicators will 
hold their own or get bigger (Ziv, for 
instance, will double its yearly output, 
has set a production budget of $9.5 
million i. Some smaller firms may be 
bought out by bigger ones (just before 
the end of 1954 MCA Tv bought Unit- 
ed Television Programs for an esti- 
mated $1 million-plus). Some firms 
will fold altogether. 

• There'll be more syndicated film 
product sold but the increases w : on't 
be uniform. Sales for some may have 
reached a temporary plateau. 

• More, daytime and across-the-board 
film programing will be offered to 
sponsors, stations. Guild is launching 
two new daytime quarter-hour shows 
early this year and will offer more lat- 
er; Official is announcing a new dailv 
15-minute soap opera; Sterling will 
offer complete across-the-board pro- 
gram packages. 

• Syndicators will emphasize qualitv 
programs rather than quantity of pro- 
duction the next 12 months. TPA, for 
instance, plans to exploit the calibre 
of its shows, stressing plot and ston - 
line. Screen Gems says syndicators 
must turn out products comparable to 
the best network shows. 

Along with these expected trends, 
which will embrace the whole industry, 
there are one or two sidelights. One 
is the emergence of station-owned or 
controlled film buying offices, centrallv 
located and similar to the New York 
department store "resident buyers" 
who buy for retailers all over the coun- 
try. Main objects: (1) Lower prices 
for films via volume purchasing and 
(2) ending the present pricing prac- 
tices whereby stations in markets of 
similar size and set saturation pa) dif- 
ferent rates for film. And syndicators, 
rather than trekking out to ever) t\ 
Station in the country, can make sales 
to a number of stations within one 
centrally-located buying olfice. 

Two of the film buying linns are 
Station Films, Inc.. and TV, Inc., both 
located in New ^ <>rk. There are oth- 
ers in Baltimore and New Haven, and 

others are in the formation sta^e. 
Station Films. Inc., which buys 



38 



SPONSOR 



product for a select list of 20 outlets, 
has bought $2 million worth of film 
in the past 18 months and predicts a 
substantially higher volume for the 
next year-and-a-half period. 

TV, Inc., was formed last year at a 
meeting of tv station operators in Spo- 
kane, Wash., and now has about 50 
members. It expects about 100 mem- 
bers by the end of '55. 

Another sidelight on production. 
Some film people told sponsor there'll 
be more films made outside the U.S., 
possibly on Caribbean islands, in Mex- 
ico or in Europe. Reason: Lower pro- 
duction cost. 

The Jamaican Film Centre, for ex- 
ample, located in Kingston, Jamaica, 
has signed Mona Kent to write a day- 
time serial story. Miss Kent, who cre- 
ated and wrote Portia Faces Life for 
many years, will write about an Amer- 
ican family in Jamaica. It's expected 
that the Jamaica Film Centre will pro- 
duce film for U.S. syndicators as well 
as its own series. 

Here, listed alphabetically by the 
syndicator's name, are comments made 
by some leading film firms: 

(Please turn to page 63) 



3. 



'■ Is there any chance that tv 
network advertisers will be able 
to add network radio in non-tv 
markets only so as to get 100% 
U.S. coverage with one network 
buy? Donald W . Stewart, advertising 
manager, The Texas Co. 

The idea of wrapping up complete 
national coverage of the United States 
through some kind of a combination 
network radio and television buy has 
received a lot of thought from admen, 
network executives. 

Reports have cropped up from time 
to time of the possibility of networks 
someday selling combined radio and 
tv networks. And, of course, there are 
simulcasts and taped radio versions of 
television programs on net radio. 

It's rarely been considered, a possi- 
bility to route a radio network around 
to non-tv areas, however, because of 
costs. Said one network official: "We 
would have to carry the signal through 
such a complex line-up that it just 
would not pay to put such a show on 
today. However, the question does 
suggest the possibility of a national 
radio show going out over a fairlv 
complete line-up of stations, with spon- 



sorship split up between one advertiser 
who wants to bu\ non-fri markets and 
another advertiser who wants supple- 
mentar) coverage in television mar- 
kets."' It was a general!) held view 
among network people contacted that 
routing a network completely around 
t\ areas would be to costly without 
some form of split sponsorship. 

I se of net radio and net tv in com- 
bination via the same show is becoming 
I Please turn to page 1<>7 i 



I ■ Are rising costs freezing out 
the small- and medium-sized ad- 
vertiser from tv? //. //. Horton, 

director of advertising, Singer Sewing 
Machine Co. 

The fear that advertisers with small 
budgets were being frozen out of tv 
by rising costs has agitated advertisers 
and agencies since video began ex- 
panding more than four years ago. 

The buying side of video pointed 
particularly to network tv costs as 
stations and sets increased and lineups 
lengthened. This current season, as 
program and time costs reached new 
peaks and the era of spectaculars was 
born, the problem of the freezing out 
of the small firm seems to some to have 
more point than ever. 

One fact is pretty well agreed on: 
The small advertiser who wants to be 
on network tv with a show of his own 
is just out of luck. The economics of 
web video just won't permit it. Even 
some of the better-known tv clients find 
a full network show a burden and have 
to fall back on alternate weeks. (There 
are, of course, network tv clients who 
buy two or more alternate weeks to 
get audience dispersion.) 

However, the networks make the 
point that it is no more necessary for 
a small advertiser to have a network 
show of his own than it is for him to 
have a full color page in Life every 
week. 

Just as there are plenty of advertisers 
who buy half a column or less in a 
magazine, so there are plenty who buy 
into the low-cost network participation 
shows. These participation shows, the 
nrt works say, offer clients some of the 
advantages of a full network show 
(such as being able to merchandise the 
star) plus some virtues that cannot be 
found in a full network show. 

The latter advantages can be sum- 



med up l>\ the term "flexibility." \\< 
advertiser can bu\ in at practicalb a 
moment's notice. He is not limited to 
the rigidity of a 13-week or longei 
cycle but can come in and out as often 
as he wants. And his station lineup is 
more flexible than a regular show. 
(For complete details, see "Network 
t\ participation shows: a buyer's 
guide." SPONSOR, 29 \o\ ember 1964.) 

The participation shows are dis- 
tinguished Erom others by the fact the) 
offer minutes for sale. There are an 
even half-dozen of them on the net- 
works, four on NBC TV alone. These 
are Today, Home and Tonight, which 
can be bought as a package, and Pin I, \ 
Lee Show. CHS TV offers the Morn- 
ing Sliou in competition with Today, 
while I)u Mont sells Paul Dixon. 

While none of the shows are in Class 
"A" time, they offer the compensating 
advantage of pinpointing specific kinds 
of audiences, such as women, children 
and the whole family. Two additional 
shows of this type, both intending to 
capitalize on the do-it-yourself trend, 
are expected to materialize this year 
on NBC TV and ABC TV. 

(Please turn to page 108 1 



5 



■ Do radio commercials today 
have the same impact as before 

tv? Samuel Winokur, vice president. 
Seeman Bros. 

"On the radio, you have your minute 
and you have your chance. The impact 
you get depends on what you do with 
these." So spoke one adman (Charles 
H. Ramsey, Vice President, Berming- 
ham, Castleman & Pierce) recenth to 
SPONSOR. 

And this about sums up what 
SPONSOR found in an opinion roundup 
of agency and research executives on 
the subject. When meaningful and 
properly built, radio pitches can be 
as impactful as ever, went the con- 
sensus, and in some instances, com- 
mercials are considered more effective 
today than several years ago. (This 
does not apply to their circulation 
but rather to effect on listeners. 

\\ ith the content (and the over-all 
"ear picture") of the commercials 
agreed to be all-important, other factors 
cited as affecting content — and. in turn, 
impact — were: 

• The unique position of radio with 

regard to the listener — it- closeness, 

(Please turn to page 1081 



10 JANUARY 1955 



39 




How /W7 admen composed "This Olc House" parody for Ford dealers 

Guitar-strummer Dwight Davis, JWT radio-tv copywriter, and would-be crooner Joe Stone, 
a Ford copy group head, wrote parody of "This Ole House," which kicked off one of 1954s 
biggest spot radio saturation campaigns. Ford dealers spent over $10,000 for the e.t. and better 
than half million for time on about 1,800 stations. It took agency six months to complete pro- 
duction, as obstacle after obstacle turned up. At the last moment, mother-to-be star became 
ill and it appeared impossible to record. Recording was finally done from a wheelchair 

40 



The diary 



Idlers Sllld wires from 
by Herman Land 

g he Fold jingle sung l>y Rosemary 

( loonex to tlu- tune of her "This Ole 
House" record deserves a prominent 
place in the "Hit Parade" of 1954's 
singing commercials. 

It may have heen exposed more 
quickh to more people than am other 
jingle of the past few years for it was 
a featured part of the gigantic Ford 
saturation campaign introducing new 
models this fall. The campaign was 
bunched for effect into two weeks, in- 
volved more than 100,000 announce- 
ments on over 1,800 stations. (Time 
cost: well over half a million dollars.) 

The jingle has significance for more 
than the mere volume of its audience 
or the fact that it was received with 
foot-stomping enthusiasm by Ford 
dealers. It represents the use of spot 
radio in a way which has excitement, 
glamor, word-of -mouth oarry-over — 
men handisability to a dealer force. 

Though the singing commercial 
dates back to the 1920's (sponsor, 13 
December. 1954, page 34) , some ad- 
vertisers have only recently begun to 
discover the extra excitement values 
the) can create when the\ use music 
and lyrics so listenable they become 
accepted as popular songs. Many jin- 
gles based on original music have 
achieved this status (a Station Repre- 
sentatives Association presentation 
now making the rounds among admen 
puts oxer a dozen examples on tape). 
Bui the J. Walter Thompson-originat- 
ed Ford jingle approached the same 
problem through a different route: 
l\\ I chose a record with a well known 
>inginu -i.ii before it became a hit. 
hired the same stai to record a com- 
mercial parody, wailed expectantly for 
the sales figures to come in on prog- 
ress of the record. 

By the time the new Fords were un- 
veiled on 11 November. Rosemary 
( looney's "This Ole House" (on the 
Columbia label) was No. 2 in national 
popularity. Ford had ridden a winner. 
It not onlv had a commercial which 
was itself bighrj listenable but one 
which had already become cheerfully 

SPONSOR 



ird's 'This Die House" jingle 

i oil story of commercial which cost 810.000. look six inonllis to produce 



familiar to the I .S. Listening public. 

As to results at point-of-sale: Deal- 
ers reported the greatest crowds in 
history filling showTooms. The gag 
went: "Please get some of the people 
out of here so I can sell cars." 

To get the story of how the Rose- 
mary Clooney jingle was put together, 
sponsor spent four days at JWT in 
New York and at the offices of Colum- 
bia Records whose "Mitch" Miller pro- 
duced hoth original and the commer- 
cial versions of "This Ole House." 

The commercial cost $10,000 
through to the master, took six 
months of hectic planning and ar- 
rangement-making from the idea stage 
to finished disks. 

Among the notable lessons to be 
found in the story is that he who seeks 
to tie in with the big-time glamor push 
name talent can lend must be prepared 
for hub-ub- — whether it's a tv show or 
a radio jingle. Also significant is the 
flexibility which tape recording plus 
expert coordination provide — helping 
to solve problems created by tight tal- 
ent schedules. In this case there was a 
particular complexity : Rosemary Cloo- 
ney was expecting a baby, was con- 
fined to a wheelchair when the record- 
ing date fell due. 

sponsor dug deep into the files at 
JWT, has pieced together the story of 
the "This Ole House" jingle in terms 
of the letters, and telegrams exchanged 
between New York, the West Coast 
where the jingle was recorded, and the 
Detroit office of JWT. 

The jingle hit the air in October 
but it was back in Ma\ of 1 ').") 1. that 
the idea of using Roseman Clooney 
was f i r — t discussed seriousb) at a three- 
day meeting in Detroit among JWT 
field reps on the Ford dealers account. 

We pick up the story with a note 
written b) Ford radio-tv programing 
head Bob Ballin shortly after the 
agencymen returned to New York. 

(Senders and recipients of corre- 
spondence are identified initially in 
letters below which have been edited 
with J\\ I g permi — ion.) 

10 JANUARY 1955 



May 16, 1954 
Jack Reeser 'JWT a e in Detroit* 
Dear Jack: 

The three-day session of our field 
reps in Detroit was hectic and stimu- 
lating as always and . . . here are some 
of the highlights of current thinking 

1. II will be a saturation approach 
bunching a great number of messages. 

2. This office will prepare recorded 
anouncements, both singing and talk- 
ing, for you to present to your dealer 
committees. 

3. We will make a special effort to 
get Rosemary Clooney, as discussed. 
Joe Stone is starting work on this. 

Robert V. Ballin (head of Ford 

RADIO-TV PROGRAMING AT JWT) 
» » * 

May 18, 1954 
Robert V. Ballin, New York 
Dear Bob: 

The more we consider the Rosemary 
Clooney tie-up out here the better we 
like it. The dealers remember her out- 
standing job for us in 1952 when she 
socked home the Ford version of 
"Come On a My House." We have felt 
that the technique of tying in with a 



popular number, either current or re- 
vival, gives us plus values that are un- 
beatable, even if not precisely measur- 
able. We had fine results with the 
Mills Brothers' rendition in 1953 of 
"Glowworm." Rosemary Clooney is one 
of the top vocalists in the field today 
and if the right combination of song 
and production can be attained, I have 
a feeling we'll have a winner. . . . 
Jack Reeser 
» • » 

May 22, 1954 
Jack Reeser, Detroit 
Dear Jack: 

Status of the Rosemary Clooney ne- 
gotiations: We are running into a 
problem. Stars today are afraid to as- 
sociate themselves too strongly with a 
particular product when competitors 
sponsor important tv shows. They fear 
being cut out of lucrative guest ap- 
pearances. Toast of the Town is an 
important show of this type. We 
should be able to assure Rosemary 
that doing a Ford commercial will not 
cut her off from this show. 

Mitch Miller, of Columbia Records, 
is going to talk with Ed Sullivan. As 

( /'lease turn to page 97) 



Rosemary Clooney recorded original version of "This Ole House," which reached hit status 
by time 1955 Fords were unveiled. Bearded Mitch Miller, Columbia Records, was producer 




41 





VN 



^ 




Jilll Boerstt Publisher of "Spot Radio Report" and 
"Factuary" plans to work with Rorabaugh to bring out quar- 
terly "Spot Radio Register" based on questionnaires to some 
700 stations. Report would be basis for dollar estimates 




1%. C. Rorabuilffh: Veteran fact-gatherer in spot field, 
"Duke" Rorabaugh uses questionnaires to survey 250 stations 
for his present "Spot Tv Report' and dollar spending pro- 
jections. This tv success may help new radio report 



Spot radio spending: 
out in the open in 1 ? 

Proposed services will provide dollar figures, ratings, campaigns 



i^linl radio is still a tipster's para- 
dise, 

tF \ ou didn't hear this from inc. 
Jack, a rep salesman may tell an im- 
portant timebuyer, lowering his voice 
cautiously, "but did you know that a 
certain new detergent you know the 
I mean has been checking avail- 
abilities in all of the major markets 
in the East?" 

"^ eah ? says the timebu) ei . rais- 
ing an eyebrow in approved sp) thi ill- 
er ii adil ion. 



42 



by Charles Sinclair 



"Gol it straight from their agency 
(his morning. It's going to be an 
eight-week saturation campaign. After- 
noon disk jockej shows. Mind you, 
this is not official. . . ." 

\nd so it goes. Bui noliodx seems 
to <'ii|o\ these cloak-and»dagger tactii s. 

"If there s one question from clients 

I hale more than an\ other. was the 

typical comment of Donahue S Coe 
timebuyer Evelyn Jones. "That's the 
y(>] question which goes 'What is our 
< ompel ii ion doing in spol i adio? 



(her and oxer again, in a spot check 
of leading agcne\ radio hmers in 
\eu York, sponsor heard such reac- 
tions. 

I he reason is eas\ to find. Spot ra- 
dio, which hilled well over the $125 
million maik In L954, is still the least- 
reported ol the leading ad media. 

Want to know who's Inning what on 
the major radio and l\ networks? 
Check with the networks' program 
schedules and station lists. Want to 
know how much the countrj s leading 

SPONSOR 



clients spent last year for magazines 
or network shows? Check with P.I.B. 
The top spenders in new -papers? 
Check Media Records. \\ ho are the 
top clients in spot television? Check 
with \. C. Rorabaugh. 

Want spot radio data? Go hunt for 
it. And be prepared to devote a lot of 
time to the chase. 

There's still no central source of 
"activity" information in spot radio. 
You can get a certain amount of gen- 
eralized data from the RAB and the 
Station Representatives Association. 
But detailed information lies behind 
an iron curtain of client-imposed se- 
crecy. 

The fact that spot radio information 
has to be tracked down cloak-and- 
dagger fashion however doesn't stop 
people from trying. 

"Our biggest spot client, Procter & 
Gamble, doesn't give out any details 
of its spot radio campaigns. But that 
doesn't stop P&G from putting the 
heat on us to find out what its com- 
petitors are doing," a Compton staffer 
admitted. 

But there are a number of hopeful 
signs that much of the Foreign Intrigue 
may be removed from spot radio fact- 



finding this \ear. 

As this issue of sponsor went to 
press, these were major spot radio re- 
search developments: 

• Spot Radio Register: Jim Boerst, 
publisher of the monthly Spot Radio 
Report l which covers sonic 300 ac- 
counts at CO agencies) and the F actu- 
ary, has plans for a new spot radio 
data-gathering sen ice. As Boerst out- 
lined it to sponsor, it will be "a quar- 
terly report, from which can be de- 
termined dollar expenditures in spot 
radio, based on information gathered 
from a cross-section list of some 600- 
700 radio stations." In producing this 
report, to be called Spot Radio Regis- 
ter, Boerst will work in conjunction 
with N. C. "Duke" Rorabaugh, who 
publishes his own spot tv report, and 
who used to put out a report on spot 
radio. Work on the data-gathering, 
says Boerst, will start "immediately." 
At presstime, Boerst set the tentative 
target date for March 1955. Cost to 
agencies: approximately 830 per quar- 
terly report. 

• A. C. Nielsen: With the local- 
level "Nielsen Station Index" ratings 
launched, the Nielsen research firm is 
now considering the addition of a 



monitoring and data-gathering service 
to the NSI ratings. Since early last 
year, Nielsen has had a purchase op- 
tion on Broadcast Advertisers Reports, 
Inc. of Darby, Pa. As outlined b) Niel- 
sen executives, the additional service — 
if it is accepted — would go like this: 
Radio and tv outlets in New York, 
Philadelphia, Chicago and Washing- 
ton would be monitored on tape. Later, 
the tapes — each covering a week's 
worth of broadcasting —would be gone 
over by Nielsen researchers. Eventual- 
ly, a list of spot radio and tv activity 
would be prepared, broken down by 
advertisers, then by stations in the 
market, then by type of activitj and 
frequency. The service, as a Nielsen 
executive voiced it, "might be expand- 
ed to cover all major markets — if the 
clients want it." Target date: "not 
definite." 

• Hooper: Prior to the tragic death 
of the late C. E. Hooper, the veteran 
researcher had put in motion a plan to 
combine local ratings with data on 
spot broadcasting. The plan is still on 
the books at the Hooper firm. As de- 
scribed to sponsor, the new service — 
tentatively titled Hoopereports — would 
(Please turn to page 104) 



The ''Big Money" ill spot: Chart below, prepared by 
N. C. Rorabaugh, highlights need for brand-by-brand data on 
spot radio spending. Chart shows how a number of key brand 
categories have increased or decreased spot radio-tv spending 
over 15-month period. Total figures for period in spot tv 
topped $25 million; in spot radio, $11 million. Figures are 



net (not gross) for time only, were computed by using maxi- 
mum frequency discount rates on stations used. Data was 
gathered by surveying a cross-section of stations and reps. 
Brands in study included those of Colgate, Lever, P&G, Mon- 
santo, Manhattan, Babbitt, Pels, Charles Antell, Jergens, 
Mrs. Tuckers, Swift, Best Poods, Standard Brands, Block 



ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES— NET FOR TIME ONLY 



ST — Spot tv 



SR — Spot radio 



Q 19 

$$m 



3RD Q 1953 



4TH 0. 1953 



1ST ft 1954 



a i9 



2ND t j\ t !954 



3RD ft 1954 



TOTALS 
TOTALS 



ST 
SR 



2.963.951 
3,105,566 



4.235.541 
3,105,566 



5,183,224 
2,177,231 



6.26-1 S2S 
1,767,301 



to a r 



DETERGENTS 


ST 
SR 


874,658 
1,484,199 


1,399,101 
1,484,199 


1.157,160 
1,063,017 


2,327,278 
694,824 


1,956.1(10 
580,601 


TOILET SOAPS 


ST 
SR 


297,242 
338,575 


273,272 
338,575 


240,479 
35,219 


305,530 
95,332 


402,078 
131,620 


SHORTENINGS 


ST 
SR 


92,946 
97,558 


97,620 
97,558 


158,843 
67,595 


209,014 
56,459 


269.440 
69,686 


MARGARINES 


ST 
SR 


42,942 
318,195 


514,836 
318,195 


1,084,022 
243,569 


722,793 
196,128 


240,816 
69,206 


DENTIFRICES 


ST 
SR 


569,842 
501,488 


1.024,254 
501,488 


1.597,352 
143,872 


1,612,558 
399,283 


1,879,553 
308,587 


HOME PERMANENTS 


ST 
SR 


663.421 
22,583 


415,415 
22,583 


337,381 
19,117 


699,289 
5,722 


931,765 
5,807 


SHAMPOOS 


ST 
SR 


422,900 
342,968 


511,043 

342.1(68 


607,987 

3(M sr_» 


388,366 

319.:.."..". 


705,902 

311,289 



6,385,654 
1,476,796 



Sunbeam: from nothing to 

on t v in two years 

Trail if ionallv lit»a\ v magazine advertiser now uses tv as major medium 




1 



A I lew \car.- ago the Sunbeam Corp. 
of Chicago was virtually unknown 
among air advertisers. Today it is 
(nit- nt i\'- big spenders, its program- 
ing varying from daytime exposure 
via The Home Shot* to the lavish and 
. ostly Sunday night spectaculars on 
NBC. Of an estimated 1955 ad bud- 
gel ol $6,000,000, about 509! is allo- 
cated to tv: 30' '< In the company's 
formerly dominant medium, maga- 
zines: I.';' ! i" newspapers. 

Association with such tv innovations 
as a daytime magazine of the air and 
the $320,000 spectacular which it co- 



sponsors with Hazel Bishop might 

stem surprising for an old conserva- 
tive company whose advertising has al- 
\\a\s avoided the sensational in favor 
of tin long-range approach. Yet the 
currenl tv pattern is quite in keeping 
with the ad pattern worked out over 
the years in other media. 

Here is how the magazine approach 
is applied by Sunbeam to tv, accord- 
ing to \1 \\ iddifield. \.p. in charge of 
advertising and sales promotion: 

I. Participations in NBC's Home 
Show correspond to insertions in the 
women's magazines. 




Elliot Saunders (r) director of N. Y. office of Perrin-Paus, and associate Tye Robinson 
produce commercials. They are shown here during rehearsal of recent NBC spectacular 

Tv color production still in a-b-c stage, is view ot agency director 

There U n<> royal road to color production on t>. is view of Elliot Saunders 
who co-produces Sunbeam commercials for Perrin-1'aus. Il< - feel- that pres- 
ent stage of art means much trial ami error before industry-wide standards 
are achieved. Much ha- to he learned, lor example, about color idiosyn- 
cracies of various foods. Saunders lin<l- that hamburgers and hams are 
unphotogenic, while pork chops, chicken and bacon <h> better before the 
i\ cameras. 4gencj retains Video Vitals to prepare dishes for i\ use. 
Saunders estimates it takes about twice as long as black and white to do a 
eolor commercial lixe. and i- much more expensive, though costs are com- 
ing down. For best results he advises working close!} with network techni- 
cians. I iloi presents other problems arising from unpredictable response 
of t\ system to lome hue-. 

44 



2. Sponsorship ol the weekly fam- 
ily-type show such as the same net- 
work's Ethel & Albert — whose fate is 
now in question — is equivalent to reg- 
ular appearances in the family-appeal 
publications. 

3. The NBC spectaculars perform 
the same basic function as the color 
spreads in Life and The Saturday Eve- 
ning I'ost: they provide powerful mer- 
chandising to the all-important dealer-. 

Sunbeams first serious tv exposure 
did not come until early 1953 with 
sponsorship of Bill Henry's Window 
Out of Washington program. In 
March, the company became the fir-t 
to sign up for The Home Show, and 
added Ethel & Albert in May. And 
along with Hazel Bishop Sunbeam wa- 
in on the first NBC color spectacular 
in September 1954. 

Behind this combination of long- 
range consumer and high-point dealer 
promotion lie over 50 years of experi- 
ence in the "traffic," or small, appli- 
ance field. Sunbeam does not expect 
immediate results from advertising, 
hut is content to let it pa\ off over a 
period of time hecause of what its 
market research has turned up. 

The es-ential lesson learned is that 
the company's products Coffeemas- 
lei. Shavemaster, Electric trypan, Bot- 
tle warmer. Toaslmaster and other 
small appliance- are not impulse 
items. Nor are they bought regularly 
to satisf) everyday consumer needs. 
for thej are in the "planned purchase" 
class. They are purchased primarily 
on "the gift Inning occasion, around 
( hristmas, Mother's Day and other 
holiday s. 

\- loi the mosl effective form of 
advertising, Sunbeam is convinced thai 
word-of-mouth recommendation has 
done more than anything else to build 
the company's reputation. I hese two 

SPONSOR 






Kn* «a'^ B ^ H " »- 




Sunbeam Color Spectaculars Network on NBC-TV 
90 Sli 1954 




OVER 40-MILLION 

VIEWER IMPRESSIONS 

P£K SPECTACULAR 

3 Spectaculars between Sept and Christmas 



1 



3 






Sunbeam is a fervid proponent of merchandising, works diligently to of sales promotion power which is useless unless the little dealer 

keep its 200,000 dealers across the country well informed on the reaches up and plugs into it. Tv in particular has proved highly 

company's advertising programs through elaborate presentations like merchandisable, the company finds. Dealer response to first color 

the one pictured. Company thinks of ad efforts as a national cable spectaculars as special show-debut meetings was great, Sunbeam says 



factors are both reflections of the 
firms emphasis on quality, Sunbeam 
believes. By sticking to the quality 
idea and never permitting its products 
to enter into price competition. Ad 
Manager Widdifield states, the com- 
pany has been successful in maintain- 
ing an association with product su- 
periority in the public mind. 

Sunbeam's buying pattern presents 
a tough advertising problem. You 
work the whole year building impres- 
sions, hoping they will pa\ off on "the 
gift buying occasion. However, since 
there are only a few peaks in the pur- 
chasing curve, and they represent the 
results of accumulated impressions 
rather than of short-term intense cam- 
paigns, how do you determine wheth- 
er vour advertising is working? 

Neither Sunbeam nor its agen<\ . 
Perrin-Paus of Chicago, have read) 
answers. Even though he has been 
associated with companj since 1930. 
Widdifield is still groping for accur- 
ate measurements of ad effectiveness. 
"I n fortunately." he says, ''advertising 
for us cannot be an exact science. Fig- 
ures, ratings, and the like, are helpful, 
but in the final analysis, one lias to 
fly by the seat of the pants, so to 

10 JANUARY 1955 



speak, and hope his judgment is 
right. What it comes to in the end. 
I suppose, is common sense. Out of 
a mass of experience we try to arrive 
at a few conclusions. In the long run. 
1 imagine that what we are actual!) 
trying to build is demand motivated 




Team that guides Sunbeam ad program: left, 
Earl Perrin, president of Perrin-Paus agency, 
Chicago, and Sunbeam ad mgr Al Widdifield 



b\ consumer acceptance and good- 
\\ ill." 

That there has been considerable 
goodwill created in the past generation 
i- evident from Sunbeam's volume rise 
lion. $2,500,000 in 1930 to $80,000,- 
000 iii 1953. The companj claims to 
be number one in the traffic appliance 
field, standing well in front of Gen- 



eral Electric and Westinghouse. It es- 
timates that Sunbeam appliances are 
being used in about 25,000,000 Amer- 
ican homes. Unit output is tremend- 
ous; the company expects it may equal 
ibis year's combined total production 
of all U.S. automobile manufacturers. 

What adds to the difficult) of evalu- 
ating the role of advertising in this 
growth story is its policy of allowing 
sales and promotion to rise together. 
Sunbeam does not believe in the spe- 
cial '"splurge' designed to make a 
quick. Hash impression. Sales and ad- 
vertising are treated as two sides of 
the same coin. This is one of the main 
reasons why Sunbeam is not to be 
found among spot air advertisers; in 
addition it believes in demonstration 
and regards the short announcement 
period as insufficient. 

Still, Sunbeam i> convinced of the 
effectiveness of tv and feels that the 
medium nun make possible a basic 
change in buying patterns thai will 
affect the company's future develop- 
ment to some extent. Karl Perrin. 
presidenl "I Pen in-Paus agenC) . H hich 
has handled the Sunbeam account for 
22 years, states that Sunbeam will con- 
i Please turn to page ')] i 



45 



How big is the audience for jour i 



M ou get a different answer from 
ever) source when you ask how big an 
audience tv commercials get. 

• Said a drug firm v.p.: "We figure 
rough!) thai 50 r ; of our program 
viewers see the average commercial." 

• Said a McCann-Erickson executive: 
"We make it something like 60% or 
better — though wed rather duck the is- 
sue with clients, since the yardsticks 
have been very rough." 

• Said the managing editor of TV 
Guide, Merrill Panitt: "Our reader 
mail shows us that not all viewers like 
all commercials by any means. But 
most viewers realize the necessity for 
sponsorship and watch the commer- 
cials." 

• Said a media analyst at Benton & 
Bowles: "It depends. Full-sponsorship 
commercials probably hit almost all of 
those who tune six minutes or longer. 
Participations reach the equivalent of 
the show's average audience. 

• Said Oscar Katz. research director 



Is 



c o 



m e r c i a 



of CBS TV: "We assume that the pro- 
gram's audience is virtually the same 
as the commercial audience in most 
cases. And most of our CBS TV spon- 
sors seem to agree with us." 

Last week NBC TV released to 
SPONSOR results of a $6,000 pilot study 
which helps to answer the question. 
Here, for the first time, are its high- 
lights: 

1 . The study showed far more peo- 
ple were reached by a network tv com- 
mercial than admen generally believed. 
In the total audience of a full-sponsor- 
ship program, 94.4% of the viewers 
were reached by — that is, remembered 
having seen on tv — at least one of the 
program's commercials. 

2. A little more than two-thirds — 
67.2 % — of program viewers were 
reached with all of the commercials in 
the program. That this figure is lower 
than the figure for at least one com- 
mercial, NBC TV feels, is largely due 
to normal turnover in the tv audience 
during the show. 

3. The average commercial in the 
full-sponsorship show under study 
reached about 80% of the total audi- 
ence, including those who have only 



watched for a few minutes. 

4. Few people are so thankless to- 
ward television advertisers that they 
deliberately used commercial segments 
as an excuse to "take a break."' Only 
2.6% of the sample interviewed in the 
M'.C I V study said they avoided all 
of the commercials in a network t\ 
show. 

The findings may prove surprising 
to many — particularly to industry ex- 
ecutives who have long pegged the 
figures at lower levels on the basis of 
their own "seat-of-the-pants" conclu- 
sions. 

They are likely to produce no joy 
among printed media salesmen who 
have often argued that the majority of 
t\ \ iewers miss the advertiser's expen- 
sive, carefully produced commercials. 

Anticipating discussion and/or 
counter-blasts, NBC TV has been care- 
ful to label the study "an experimental. 
'pilot' job — relating to one broadcast of 
one program." In addition. NBC TV 
has not set about promoting the study 
in agency circles as the definitive 
answer but rather as "a useful, inter- 
esting study that might be the proto- 
type of extensive future research." 



NEW CAR COMMERCIAL -RECOGNITION AND RECALL 



FULL PART AVERAGE. 

PROGRAM PROGRAM ALL 

VIEWERS VIEWERS VIEWERS 



7. Recognized commercial 90.6% 53.4% 78.9% 



i u hen shown it) 



2. Recalled commercial 68.9% 30.8% 53.2% 



I without seeing it) 




% by which "recognition" tops "recalF': 48.3% 

New car commercial in pilot study done on DoSoto's 
"You Bet Your Life" (Groucho Marx) scored almost 
50% higher than in non-visual "recall" technique when 
film clips of show were shown in six-city Starch check 




46 



SPONSOR 



iiiiiiiti ial ? 



More than 94% of viewers saw at least one of test pro- 
gram's eoiiimereials, new NBC "pilot" study shows 



The study is the most thorough of 
its type to date, utilizes a new research 
technique in evaluating the extent to 
which viewers remember commercial-. 
It's an important guidepost in the not- 
so-new search by admen for a figure 
that shows just how many people 
actually saw a tv commercial. 

(It's interesting to note that the 
problem of commercial attentiveness is 
not as pressing in radio. In fact, the 
situation is just the reverse. As Har- 
per Carraine. CBS Radio research di- 
rector, told sponsor: "You don't have 
to be watching radio to be reached by 
its commercials. Radio follows people 
all over the house — particularly since 
the trend to multi-set homes began. It 
doesn't matter if radio listeners are do- 
ing something else while a commercial 
is on — they're reached anyway. Our 
own experimental research, made over 
a period of time, shows clearly that 
the 'average audience' of a network 
radio show is the same as 'average 
commercial audience.' This is one of 
radio's great sales values.") 

Background: How many viewers see 
commercials is a hot issue for admen 



concerned with close measurement of 
tv's cost efficiencj . 

Former Borden ad manager Henry 
Schacte, now a v. p. of the Bryan Hous- 
ton agency, told sponsor: "We have 
some idea of viewing attentiveness to 
commercials from looking at studies \w 
Gallup-Robinson which attempt to 
measure how well viewers can 'play 
back' the sales points in commercials 
a day or so later. But we don't really 
have accurate figures on how many 
people altogether were reached l>\ 
commercials — and we'd be most inter- 
ested in research on this topic.'' 

A policy-level v. p. of Young & 
Rubicam, 1954 leader in broadcast 
advertising billings, stated: "If the 
average viewer is a 'Vanishing 
American' during tv commercials, we 
certainly want to know it. It affects 
the balance necessary between video 
and audio selling techniques in com- 
mercials we create for our network tv 
clients. Therefore, we plan to make 
this problem a part of our 1955 tv 
research projects." 

There's nothing new about the prob- 
lem, either. 

From the earliest days of audience 




Hugh M. Beville, Jr., NBC TVs Director of 
Research & Planning, feels study provides 
indication that very few people avoid tv com- 
mercials and two-thirds see all commercials 



measurement, researchers have sought 
to check on commercial listening and 
more recently commercial viewing. 
Checking sponsor identification, for 
example, has long been a feature of 
the research techniques of Hooper and 
Pulse in radio, and Trendex and ARB 
in television. For years Nielsen carried 
a "Commercial Minute Rating" in 
radio, dropped it about four years 
ago since it almost always equaled the 
general audience level of the show. 
NBC and CBS radio webs, Politz and 

(Please turn to page 93) 




USED CAR COMMERCIAL -RECOGNITION AND RECALL 



FULL PART AVERAGE. 

PROGRAM PROGRAM ALL 

VIEWERS VIEWERS VIEWERS 



f. Recognized commercial 89.3% 68.5% 82.8% 

(when shown it) 



2. Recalled commercial 

(without seeing it) 



80.6% 47.4% 66.7% 

% by which "recognition" tops "recall": 24.1% 



Gap narrowed on used car commercial, but "recogni- 
tion" still produced higher score than "recall." "Rec- 
ognition" average in study is about double average 
"noting" figure for color print ads in Starch studies 




10 JANUARY 1955 



47 



ladio never went awaf 




MJIC's Worth Kramer says radio's progress lias boon made dospito throo 
destructive* foroos: ratings. merchandising, bad business practices 



Worth Kramer, author of this article, is v. p. and 
general manager of W]R, Detroit. He's well known 
in industry circles for his vigorous opposition to 
forces which he believes hurt radio, for his con- 
structive approach to better radio, for his program- 
ing innovations. He opposes the use of ratings 
and merchandising as sales tools, is equally vehement 
in his opposition to off-rate card selling— "bargain 
basementism" as he terms it. His thinking on radio 
was expressed most recently this summer in an enthusiasti- 
cally received talk which forms the basis for this 
article, \dmen and broadcasters alike will find his 
approach to building radio on solid ground stimulating 
and SPONSOR incites comment, pro and con. from readers. 



»#uring the past few weeks in your 
dailj contacts with fellow broadcasters, 
agency executives, and advertisers, 
you, I am sure, have heard, as have I, 
comments such as these — "Well, radio 
is showing signs of reviving," or, "Ad- 
vertisers arc rediscm t-iinii radio." or 
perhaps, "Radio is certainlj coming 
back. 

Kadio is roming hack ridiculous! 
Radio the universal, radio the vital, 
radio the "everywhere" medium, never 
went away. 1 1 \ as hard as some "I 
its leadership has to send ii awa) to 
give ii ■! nice quiel Initial it just 
reei ei went. In its refusal i" be "bui ted 
alive, radio i an \ ei j well be likened 
to the faithful dog which, though often 
abused l>\ it- master, maintains con- 



slant loyalty to him, and after his oc- 
casional heatings, starts slowly wag- 
ging his tail, looks up to him with 
understanding eyes, licks his hand as 
if to say, O.K., that's over, where do 
we go from here? 

For the past few years, radio lias had 
to fight three major destructive forces: 
i 1 i use of ratings as a -ales tool; (2) 
merchandising; (3) had business prac- 
tices. Ii is. however, emerging all the 
stronger for ii- battles. 

First, lei - look at ratings as a sales 
tool, and before going into the subject, 
I should like to make it clear thai ii 
a stud) could be made which would 
give .i true reflection ol actual listen- 
ing in all the places where radio is 
listened to, I certainh would be among 



the first to support such a study. If 
all of the listening in living rooms, 
recreation rooms, kitchens, bathrooms, 
bedrooms, screened porches — all of the 
listening in automobiles, in pleasure 
craft, in public places — could be truly 
measured, our job as radio broadcast- 
ers would certainly be a cinch. 

As a sales tool I consider ratings 
deadK indeed, not only to the indi- 
vidual station hut particularly to the 
medium itself. Our hig job as a me- 
dium is to get allocated to radio its 
rightful share of the advertising dol- 
lar. How can we expect to accomplish 
this through ratings when ratings, by 
their very nature, constrict circulation 
to a factor of per-pmgram or even 
niinute-b\ -minute listenership as op- 
posed to the factor of total circulation 
— the selling tool of other major me- 
dia. 

Look for a moment at outdoor. I he 
purveyors of outdoor advertising sell 
the medium h\ pointing out the excel- 
lence of their locations the traffic, 
both pedestrian and car-borne, which 
How- past these locations. In other 
words, they sell total potential the 
traffic that "goes by" — the people who 
are available or in a position to see 
the hoard. The) certainl) do not count 
the number of cars which stop before 
a given billboard location, focus theii 
lights on it and \ iew it. \ et, radio has 
trapped itself into doing the eipialU 
ridiculous counterpart providing, 

through ratings, the supposed actual 



V6 



SPONSOR 



number of people listening to a given 
program. 

Newspapers — how do they sell? 
They sell their total circulation, the 
excellence of their features, the pop- 
ularih of their writers, the freshness 
of their comics, the excellence of their 
all around sports and news coverage. 
No o ie has e\ei heard ol a new spapei 
salesman quoting the readership of a 
given ad on Page 56. 

Let's look at magazines. Advertisers 
and agencies have been conditioned 
awaj from Starch's and other reader- 
ship statistics — they have little or no 
influence. I've talked with agency ex- 
ecutives and advertisers who frankk 
state that in buying magazine space 
readership statistics are given little no- 
tice — yet these same people will de- 
mand ratings from networks and sta- 
tions and will go on to spend thou- 
sands upon thousands of dollars using 
ratings as one of the principal justifi- 
cations of their purchases. You've so 
often heard buyers say, "Well, you 
know we don't believe in ratings but 
we'd like to have them to pass on to 
the client.'" Actually, then. m\ point 
is that while advertisers and agencies 
have been educated to give very little 
importance to readership studies, we've 
permitted them to attach great and 
significant importance to ratings. 

I made it a point the other week to 
check up on how Life sells its space 
and was startled to learn that, among 
other things, they have their salesmen 
point out to advertisers that Life mag- 
azine over a 13-week period influences 
over 62 1/) million Americans. As a 
salesman I tip my hat to Life — parlay- 
ing a basic five million plus circula- 
tion into the influencing of over 62 
million people in a 13-week period is 
a masterpiece of showmanship and 
salesmanship, but again I venture to 
say that they didn't accomplish this 
by even attempting, through reader- 
ship studies or ratings to show adver- 
tisers the number of people who read 
or even saw a given ad or a given ar- 
ticle in any given issue. 

In describing traffic conditions ill 
my home town of Detroit, one of m\ 
friends the other day termed it a "dog 
eat dog operation." Have not we 
broadcasters been guilty of prettv 
much the same type of operation? 
Have we not concerned ourselves too 
assiduously to the job of selling 
against our compering stations in our 
markets that we've overlooked the real 



problem — that of providing our medi- 
um with sales tools that compare la- 
vorabl) with those used b\ other me- 
dia? We must enter the offices of ad- 
vertisers and agencies throughout the 
countrj with sales tools that give us 
equal stature and equal opportunit) 
with other media. I say again that if 
we broadcasters permit ad\ertisers to 
continue t<> attach great importance to 
rulings as far as radio is concerned 
and yet demand no equally constric- 
tive statistics from other major me- 
dia, we can be likened to a man enter- 
ing the 100-yard dash with a handi- 
cap of a LOO-pound lead weight on his 
had. 

Some weeks ago I received a pub- 
licity release from a Midwe-t station 
announcing an increase in day rates. 
I his pleased me no end until I read 
further. Now hold vour hats — the in- 







crease in rates was based on uii 
the index of which showed that Mid- 
west station some 70 % better than the 
second station in the market. My ques- 
tion is, Mr. Anthony, if next month 
that station's ratings indicate that they 
are only 40% better than the second 
station, will they plan to reduce rates 
proportionately? Much as I personal- 
Is admire the heads of some of the 
research firms, I want to go on record 
that they will not he setting our rales. 
You've probably gathered that I 
don't care much for ratings but some- 
times they do provide a most amusing 
story like this one which emanated 
from another Midwest station. Per- 
haps you saw it in a recent trade pub- 
lication. A representative of WCAN, 
Milwaukee, made this contribution to 
the discussion of ratings at a recent 
(Please turn to page 88) 



s*fi 



1-4K- 




RADIO NEEDS these stimuli to continue growth, Kramer believes 

SERVICE: Best formula for malting a station important to its community is operation in 
accord with the FCC's regulation: ". . . that the public interest, convenience and necessity 
will be served. . ." It's one of the best guarantees of business to follow, says Kramer, and 
"I know of nothing keeping public service broadcasts from being sponsored. " 

TECHNICAL TOOLS AND PROGRAMING: Fundamental to progress are best possible 
technical tools. Equipment like mobile short wave and minitape should be available to take 
advantage of radio's natural advantage — speed. Good live talent should be sought out by 
each station rather than programing d.j. against d.j. each using the top 10 records as a format. 

IMPROVED BUSINESS PRACTICES, MORALE: ". . . on our station there is only one deal 
and you'll find it there in 'Standard Rate & Data.' Good business practice . i . begets good 
business." Within each station morale should not be allowed to lag due to diversion of 
management interests. Radio stations should have exclusive management personnel. 



RADIO IS HURT fay these three self-imposed evils, says Kramer 

RATINGS: Kramer would favor use of ratings — if they measured radio's full audience. But 
they hurt radio because they underrate its audience. Other media, he points out, sell total 
circulation rather than seeking to stress to the advertiser how many people see individual 
ads. Radio should sell with tools which give it equal stature with other media. 

MERCHANDISING: Use of special point-of-sale and marketing tie-ins with radio hurt the 
medium because "... most plans with which I have come in contact, psychologically as 
well as actually, place radio ... in a secondary position." The salesman sells dump displays, 
choice billboards, car cards decals. He's selling everything except his product, radio. 

BAD BUSINESS PRACTICES: Off-rate card selling, talent concessions, special packages for 
special advertisers should be eliminated in favor of rates based on circulation, programing, 
cost of operation. ". . . let's make 'Standard Rate & Data' a bible, not the first book of a 
continued mystery story." (See text for full expression of Mr. Kramer's views.) 




10 JANUARY 1955 



49 



How radio forced distribution 



for cement coating ::.' 



. ups number of dealers 
nearly 400% in three months 



JJ ow do \ mi reach the i onsumei 
with your product when the retailers 
don't want to stock it? 

The McMillan Products Co. of Hazel 
Park. Mich, found one way: It went 
directly to the consumer — via radio — 
and forced distribution. In three 
months, they increased the number of 
their retail outlets 400' , . 

The product: Cement Dus-Top, a 
liquid coating designed to seal and 
dust-proof cement basement floors to 
end the tracking of cement dust into 
the house. McMillan, an industrial 
floor contractor, had converted this 
product from an industrial to a con- 
sumer item, had repackaged and re- 
named it and launched it on the mar- 
ket in October 1953. 

The reluctant retailers: hardware 
dealers in Detroit. McMillan had ap- 
proached them initially with an in- 
tensive direct mail and personal-con- 
tact sales campaign. But by December 
1953, only 37 of them were stocking 
Cement Dus-Top — a number far from 
satisfactory to McMillan. 



Something was wrong. Here was a 
product which solved an age-old house- 
hold problem (and also was right in 
line with the current do-it-yourself 
movement). There was only one other 
similar item in the field. McMillan 
felt sure of its consumer appeal, felt 
that retailers should have been snap- 
ping it up — but they weren't. 

McMillan president, Robert C. Mc- 
Millan, and his sales manager, Russell 



case history 



L. Simpson put their heads together. 
Suddenly, a spark from McMillan: 

"All right! If we can't sell the re- 
tailer on Cement Dus-Top. we'll sell the 
consumer and he'll sell the retailer!" 

Once it was decided to approach the 
consumer directly, the next question 
was what was the best way? The firm 
felt it couldn't afford tv. Several print 
media were discounted, for one reason 



or another. What about radio? That, 
somehow, rang a bell for McMillan 
and Simpson. 

It so happened that both of these 
executives were fans of a Detroit disk 
j ockey — Tom George — who had a 
daily afternoon stanza on WJBK.. Ac- 
cording to the D. A. Marks agency of 
Detroit (McMillan's agein \ I . "the} 
felt that his warm personality and 
down-to-earth sincerity were just what 
they needed to sell the public on Ce- 
ment Dus-Top." He was the kind of 
d.j. who ad libs most of the com- 
mercial from a fact sheet on a product. 

So the Tom George SJwu not the 
nod. On 1 January 1954, Cement Dus- 
Top's message was launched on this 
program — one pitch a day, Monday 
through Friday, in an experimental 
four-week schedule. The copy included 
a phone number and an invitation to 
listeners to phone for Cement Dus-Top 
dealer locations. 

By the end of the second week on 
the air, the commercials were pulling 
{Please turn to page 97) 



Tom George, I., WJBK, Detroit, disc jockey, whose patter 
opened up scores of new retail outlets for Cement Dus-Top floor 
coating, pins up flag denoting another dealer for the home product. 






! 



r 

- «7 




™. T 0P Itsfe 

UP FROM YOUR 



Radio was used after direct mail, personal contact alone failed. 
Others in photo: (I. to r.), Bob McMillan, president, McMillan Prod- 
ucts; Pete Allen, a/e D. A. Maries agency; Jim Johnston, WJBK 





HUHE 



busA\9us 




mm f\ 
P 5 1 I 






I. 






portrait 

of a 
market 



ALBANY, Capital of New York 
State, lies at the heart of WRGB's 
coverage area. As a center of gov- 
ernment, education and commerce 
for the Empire State, it is a vital 
part of the WRGB market area 
that includes 30 counties of New 
York, Vermont, Massachusetts and 
Connecticut. 




Represented Nationally 



by NBC Spot Sales 

10 JANUARY 1955 



WRGB 

A General Electric Station 
in Schenectady 

The Capital District's Only Full-time Television Station 

NEW YORK * CHICAGO * CLEVELAND * DETROIT * SAN FRANCISCO 

LOS ANGELES * CHARLOTTE* • ATLANTA* * DALLAS* 
BOMAR LOWRANCE and ASSOCIATES 



51 



iVeic developments on SPONSOR slovies 
See: 
Issue: 




"CUMES": what ihey mean to radio 
sponsors 



3 May 1934. page 40 

^ . . . Use of cumulative ratings as an in- 
3lllljet*I. ( j ex f a program's total undupli- 
cated "circulation" 



"l ou"re bringing out a new product and you want to tell as man) 
people about it as you possibl) can fast. Il would he hel[)ful to 
know which stations will give \ ou the biggest unduplicated audiences 
in the shortest period of time. 

Soon two services will be available that provide this kind of data, 
including: a station's rating at am one lime, its average rating over 
a period of time and — most important in the case outlined above — its 
total unduplirated audience over a specified period of time. 

This total unduplicated audience or "cumulative audience" is the 
total number of different people reached by one or more programs 
or announcements over a stipulated period. In order to get cumula- 
tive ratings you have to keep making audience measurements of a 
fixed sample of people (or homes) over a period of time to find out 
how many unduplicated listeners or viewers there are. 

Over a year ago A. C. Nielsen Co. began issuing cumulative audi- 
ence measurement reports for national radio programs. Then it 
recentlj announced that beginning next month it would issue reports 
on cumulative audiences reached by stations on the local level. The 
first two markets to be so surveyed will be Los Angeles and Philadel- 
phia, with more added regularly. 

Last month The Pulse, Inc., announced it would initiate cumulative 
audience reports for advertisers and stations in 24 markets. Dr. Syd- 
ney Roslow, director of The Pulse, said the new measurement is 
needed because of the nature of spot broadcast advertising. 

"More and more advertisers are buying saturation-type schedules 
on individual stations," Dr. Roslow said. "For these advertisers the 
quarter-hour ratings are not only inadequate but also frequently are 
deceplbe since they give no indication of the changing nature of a 
station's audience." 

The new report will cover "blocks" of time, six hours in each 
block, and will measure the post-midnight audience for the first time. 
Information will be gathered through personal interviews conducted 
at night. Reports will be on a semi-annual basis. 

Pulse calls its new service Cumulative Pulse Audience (CPAl. It 
will include: 

• The total number of people listening and viewing I both in- and 
out-of-home) for all the tv and/or radio stations in markets reported 
as well as the total number of people reached by any one station. 

• "Circulation" data for each radio and t\ station. Figures on the 
per< enl oi population readied over two weeks could be developed. 

These radio-tv "circulation" figures also could be used for com- 
parison with newspaper and magazine circulation figures. 

• Audience turnover throughout the da\ and week. \ station with 
an average rating of 2.."> ami a cumulative audience rating of L9 
would have an audience turnover of 7 or <"> times. 

• The socio-economic level of people attracted to certain station- 
also could be made available to advertisers. 

"The field work Eoi Vw York ahead) is done." Dr. Roslow told 
sponsor, "ami our first report will be oul in a lew days. 

I he reports should make linn' buying easier, said Dr. Roslow, be- 

• ause oi advertise] will be able to pick exactl) the audience he want-. 
He'll be able t<> find a solid core of listeners who listen or view a 

station houi aftei hour and who he can vince through repetition. 

iii on thi othei hand, he can -elect an audience which is constantl) 

. hanging in ordei to gel a dispersion ol his message. * * * 




Safes and Service Wed; 
Sponsor Blissful 

JUL News Wins 
Steady Renewal 



Station WRAK, Williamsport, 
Pa., likes the number "13." One of 
its advertisers has sponsored an AP 
news program for that many years. 

It is the station management's 
opinion that this success story of 
consistent renewals is based on 
(1) genuine public service and (2) 
concrete sales performance. 

"Confair News," sponsored by 
the Confair Bottling Co., Williams- 
port, Pa., is broadcast over WRAK 
at 12 :15 p.m. daily, Monday through 
Saturday. Holding an audience day 
in and day out for thirteen years 
has paid off in the increasing busi- 
ness enjoyed by this soft drink 
manufacturer. 

To quote the sponsor, Mr. Z. H. 
Confair, President of Confair Bot- 
tling, "We are happy to renew each 
year, knowing that we are present- 
ing an invaluable public service, 
made possible by the comprehen- 
sive coverage of The Associated 
Press." 



And from J. Wright Mackey, 
Commercial Manager at 
WRAK, this comment: "We 

work hard to keep our sponsor 
happy . . . Associated Press is 
a welcome aid in renewing a 
satisfied account." 




52 



SPONSOR 



SPONSORS WARM TO AP 
Because . . . it's better 
and it's better known. 



"About 100 injured 
Sticking with it. 



Will call you back. 



if 



Case History No. 4 

Merrill Morris, news director of 
WMTR, Morristown, N. J., had just 
arrived home. It was late. A full day 
at the station was behind him. The 
phone rang. He was told: 

"Bleachers at the Dover auto 
speedway have collapsed. Looks 
like a good story/' 

Morris called The Associated 
Press, then headed for the speedway, 
15 miles away. Enroute, he picked 
up a police bulletin: 

"All available ambulances needed 
in Dover. Urgent!'" 

The speedway was a scene of busy 
doctors and ambulance crews. Aquick 
check gave Morris the broad facts. 

"Looks like about 100 in- 
jured," he reported. "Sticking 
with it. Will call you back." 

Although WMTR couldn't use the 
news until the next morning. Morris 
stuck with the story all night . . . inter- 
viewing doctors, victims, relatives. 

Finally the story was wrapped up 
and Morris went home to bed. 

Even as Morris slept, WMTR con- 
tinued to protect The AP. 

Station Manager Kenneth Croy 
and Nick DeRienzo followed up on 
the condition of the injured. 




Once again, Station WMTR — 
noted for being on top of the news 
— had done a top-notch job for The 
Associated Press and fellow AP 
members everywhere. 

"We give The AP the complete 
story as quickly as possible and 
we hope other members will do 
the same. The more all of us con- 



tribute the better the entire AP 
report will be." 



Merrill Morris, Kenneth 
Croy and ISick DeRienzo 
are among the many thou- 
sands who help make The 
AP better — and better 
known. 



If your station is not yet using 
Associated Press service, your AP 
Field Representative can give you 
complete information. Or write— 



Those who know famous brands... know the most famous name in news is Jr 
10 JANUARY 1955 




53 



Join the Ch« 



The 5th Network-' 7 may * e th u e HrV 9 

answer to his TV problem 



i, 




At's still a seller's market in buying national 
television time. Newspapers can add pages . . . mag- 
azines can add sections, but as long as an hour has 
60 minutes and a week seven days, television will 
remain a seller's market. 

f\ Figure it yourself. Choice time is 
>J V S) 8:00-10:30 P.M. That's 5 one-half 
\ j \ hours a day. Allow for the full-hour 
shows and the multi-product adver- 
tisers with several time segments, and you can see 
why existing networks are limited to around 00 or 
70 sponsors forming the "Charmed Circle." 

Perhaps we've been lucky because right now four 
Screen Gems produced film shows are racking up 
enviable ratings on networks. We value our large 
national accounts, but know many advertisers can- 
not get network time, or feel that the rigidness of 
network control is not in their best interest. 

Fortunately for them— and they may be national 






• 



or regional in scope— the networks do not havi 
monopoly on creative imagination. Fine progra 
are being turned out in our studios in Hollywi 
and New York, as well as by others. 

Advertisers need not be dependent on one v 
work, one time slot. Good spot time is scarce 1 
it is not unobtainable, and a really "hot" show 1 
a faculty for clearing markets. 






E <ir h advertiser can create a \ 

kind of in t irork—The 5th NetM 



^ e=s ^ =s ^J — his own . Born out of the creatiri 
ability of producers of film enttj 
tainment, and the administrative experience w 
advertising agencies, advertisers can tailor-malj 
their own "network," choosing their own marked 
and time spots, and retaining the freedom to nnnj 
their shows for even better availabilities. Furthei 
they have a wider choice of programs and a great* j 
degree of control over format, talent, and material 



med Circle 



this method, national advertisers can get cov- 
! in every television market at less cost than 
ying those same markets on a network. Where 
dvertiser prefers to limit his coverage, and 
'how can be sold to others in non-competitive 
L the package producer can substantially re- 
; the cost to the original sponsor. When a por- 
)f these savings is allocated for promotion and 
•handising, you can get top audiences at lowest 
ber-thousand. 

Though your program may vary as 
to time or days, strong promotion as 
used by the film industry... in news- 
papers, advertising, publicity, and 
handising tie-ins... can more than offset the 
tted value of a uniform time period nationally. 



r 





We sincerely believe that The 5th Netivork— your 
own show, in your own time spots, on stations of 
your selection— is the only way you can join the 
Charmed Circle and attain a satisfactory rating. 



RATINGS 




We've done it for The Ethyl Corpo- 
ration through B.B.D.&O. And we're 
preparing a top-flight, top-budgeted 
Hollywood series now for the Falstaff 

Brewing Company through Dancer- Fitzgerald - 

Sample, Inc. at a fraction of its production cost. 

Others, too, are seriously considering this fresh 

approach to national advertising. 

If you would like to know more about The 5th 
Network and how it can work for you, why not get 
in touch with us now. We will be happy to sit down 
and discuss in detail a plan to fit your specific needs. 





TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORPORATION, 233 WEST 49th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N.Y. • CIRCLE 5-5044 

The only company providing advertisers with, Hollywood and New York custom 
produced national shoivs, syndicated programming, and commercials— all on film. 



gmHiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^. 



Tv film shows recently made available for syndication 

Programs issued for national syndication since the spring of 7 9 54. 

Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



B 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length 



No. in series 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length No. in strict 



ADVENTURE 



EDUCATIONAL 



Adventure Album 


Interstate 


Toby Anguish 


15 rrir. 


Adventures of Rin 


Screen Gems 


Screen Gems 


30 mln. 


Tin Tin 








Confidential File 


Guild Films 


Guild Films 


30 mln. 


Jet Jackson, Fly- 


Screen Gems 


Screen Gems 


30 mln. 


ing Commando 








Jungle Jim 


Screen Gems 


Screen Gems 


30 min 


Jungle Macabre 


Radio 4 Tv 


Radio & Tv 


15 min. 




Packages Inc. 


Packages Inc. 




Mandrake the 


ABC TV 


Atlantic Prod. 


30 mln. 


Magician 








Passport to Danger 


ABC TV 


Hal Roach Jr 


30 min. 



Time for Tune-0 



AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION 
al Alexander 



60 min. or 
30 min. 



CHILDREN'S 



Adventures of 

Danny Dee 
Adventures of Rin 

Tin Tin 

Boy's Railroad 

Club 
Let's Draw 
Playtime with 

Jerry Bartell 
World of Wolo 



Danny Le« 

Screen Gems 

Association 

Films Inc. 
Geo. Bagnall 

Sterling 

Geo. Bagnall 



Irwin Rosee 

Screen Gems 

Association 

Films Inc. 
Frank Webb 
Jerry Bartell 

New Albion 
Films 



15 mln. 
30 min. 
15 mln. 

15 min. 
15 min. 

15 min. 



COMEDY 



Eddie Cantor 
Comedy Theatre 

Meet Corliss 
Archer 

Meet the O'Briens 

The Goldbergs 
The Little Rascals 

You Can't Take 
It With You 



Ziv 

? I 

Official 
Guild Films 
Interstate 

Screen Gems 



Ziv 

Ziv 

Roland Reed 
Guild Films 
Hal Roach 

Screen Gems 



30 mln. 

30 mln. 

30 min. 
30 mln. 
20 min. 
10 mln. 
30 min. 



DOCUMENTARY 



Impact 

Norman Vincent 

Ptale 
Tenth of a Nation 

This It the Story 
Where Were You? 



All Star Theatre 
Author's Playhouse 
Celebrity Playhouse 
Conrad Nagel 

Theatre 
Hit Honor. 

Homer Bell 
Hollywood to 

Broadway 
Little Show 
Man Behind the 

Badge 
Mayor of the 

Town 
Most Likely to 

Succeed 
Mr. & Mrs North 

O Henry Tv 

Theatre 
Paris Pn elnel 
Bticrlocli Holmes 
ralfi of Tomorrow 
The Star and the 

8tory 
Th. Whistler 



Natl. Telefilms 

Guild Films 

Essex Films 

Sterling 
UTP 



Herbert Breg- 

steln 
Guild Films 

American News- 
reel 
Morton Tv Prod. 
Blng Crosby 



60 min. 

15 min. 

15 mln. 

15 min. 
30 min 



DRAMA. MYSTERY 



Screen Gems 
UTP 

Screen Gems 
Guild Films 

NBC TV 

Film 
Atlas Tv 

Sterling 
MCA 



Advertisers' Tv 
Program Service 
UTP 

MPTv 
MPTv 
TeeVr. 
Official 



Screen Gems 
Morgan & Solow 
Screen Gems 
Andre Luotto 

Prod 
Galahad Prod 

Demby Prod. 

Sterling 
Procktor 

Gross-Krasne 

Centurlan Prod. 

John W. Loveton 

Gross- Kraine 

Etolle Prod. 
Sheldon Reynolds 
G Foley 
4. Star Prod 



CBS TV Film Leslie Parsons 



m mln. 
30 mln. 
30 mln. 

311 mln. 

30 mln 

ill mln 

15 mln. 
30 min. 

30 min 

30 mln. 

30 min. 

30 mln. 

30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 
30 mln 

30 mln 



26 
26 

39 

26 

39 
52 

26 

26 



130 

26 

6 

52 
13 



52 

39 

39 
39 
100 

39 



2fi 



M 



52 
26 



78 
39 
52 
26 

39 

13 

39 
39 

29 

39 

57 

39 

39 
39 
26 
39 



Popular Science 
This is Charles 
Laughton 



Interstate 
TeeVee 



Jerry Fairbanks 
Gregory-Harris 



15 min. 
15 min. 



INTERVIEW 



Spotllte of Holly- 
wood 



Geo. Bagnall 



Hollywood Spot- 
lite Newsfllm 



MUSIC 



Connie Haynes 
Show 

Florlan ZaBach 
Show 

Frankie Laine 
Show 

Horace Heldt 
Show 

Music for Every- 
body 

The Guy Lombardo 

Show 
This is Your Music 



Guild Films Guild Films 

Guild Films Guild Films 

Guild Films Guild Films 
Consolidated Tv Geo. Bagnall 

Sterling Sterling 

MCA MCA 

Official Jack Denove 



Adventure Out ef 
Doors 


Van Coevering 
Prod. 


Van Coevering 
Prod. 


15 min. 


All. American 
Game of Week 


Sportsvlslon 


Sportsvlslon 


30 mln. 


Big Playback 


Screen Gems 


Screen Gems 


15 min. 


College Grid 
Classics 


Vitaplx 


Ray Gordon 


15 mln. 


Greatest Fights of 
the Century 


Mannle Baum 

Enterprises 


Allan Black 


15 min. 


Pro Grid 
Classiet 


Vitaplx 


Ray Gordon 


15 mln. 


Sports Mirror 


Geo. Bagnall 


Wlckham Film 


15 min. 


Trlesportt 
Digest 


MCA 


Tel Rt 


30 mln. 


The Big Fight 


The Big Fights 


The Big Fights 


60 min 


This Week in 
Sports 


INS 


Hearst- 
Metrotone 


15 mln. 


Touchdown 


MCA 


Tel Ra 


30 mln 


World's Greatest 
Fighters In 
Action 


The Big Fights 


The Big Fights 


15 mln. 



VARIETY 



Bride & Groom 
Date with a Star 
Movie Museum 



Guild Films Guild Films 15 mln. 

Consolidated Tv Geo. Bagnall 15 min. 

Sterling Blograph 15 mln. 



WOMEN'S 



It's Fun to Reduce 
The Sewing 
Room 



Guild Films 
Zahler Films 



Guild Films 
Centaur 



15 mln. 
15 mln. 



77 
26 



15 min. 


39 


30 mln. 


39 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


26 


30 min. 


52 


30 min. 


52 


30 min. 


26 



NEWS 


Adventures In 
the News 


Sterling Telenews 


15 mln 


26 


PANEL 


Answers for 
Americans 


Facts Forum Hardy Burt 


30 mln. 


52 


SERIAL STORY 


Heart of Juliet 
Jones 


Official Chas. Irving 


15 mln. 


195 


SPORTS 



26 

Not set 

52 
13 

104 

13 

13 
39 

52 

52 

13 

57 



39 
26 
26 



39 
13 



!No iyn<llf itloi 9PON 0)B til Iv film symMeators to send Information on new films. 



56 



SPONSOR 



Tricks like this... 



are sure-fire. They lift TV audiences right out of their 
seats — especially when spotted in "live" shows. 
Easy to produce, too — entertainment or commercial 
—when you USE EASTMAN FILM. 

For complete information — what film to use, 
latest processing technics — write to: 

Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 




Coast 

Madison Avenue 
,ew York 17, N. Y. 



137 North Wabash Avenue 
Chicago 2, Illinois 



6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, California 



Agents for the distribution and sal. of Eastman Professional Motion Picture Films: 

W. J. GERMAN, INC. 

Fort Lee, N. J., Chicago, III., Hollywood, California 



HERE'S A TIP. Do it in COLOR. 
Chances are, you'll be needing it. 




SPONSOR 



I. ><*ir stations on air* 



CITY A STATE 



CALL CHANNM 

LETTERS NO. 



'EST PALM BEACH, 
Flo.- 



WEAT-TV 



12 



ON AIR 
DATE 



ERP (kw)'*. Antenna NET STNS. 

Visual (ft)"' AFFILIATION ON AIR 



MARKETt '. PERMITEE 4 MANAGER 
iOOO) I 



1 Jon. 



112 320 ABC WIRK-TV 222 vhf 

WJNO-TV 



WEAT. Inc 

James R. Meachem. pros. 

& gen mgr 
James W. McGaughney. 

v.p. 
E. H Cochrane, v.p. 
Russtll 0. Morrow, tres. 



ff. JVcmj construction permits* 



CITY t 8TATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE OF 

GRANT 



ON-AIR 
TARGET 



|ERP (kw)" Antenna 
Visual (ft)"* 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

IOOO) 



PERMITEE & MANAGER 



RADIO 
REP1 



vIRBANKS, Aalsko 



11 



29 Dec. 



11 



-51 s KFIF' 



m^a Northern Tv Inc. 

A. G. Hiebert. pres. 
J. M w.ihi.n. v.p 

B. J. Gottsteln. tres. 



Iff. \«'n applications 



CITY & STATE 



CHANNEL DATE ERP (kw)« 

NO. FILED Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)"* 



ESTIMATED 
COST 



ESTIMATED 

1ST YEAR 

OP. EXPENSE 



TV STATIONS 
IN MARKET 



APPLICANT 



AM 
AFFILIATE 



LO, Hawaii 
INBURY, Pa. 
)SEBURG, Ore. 



9"' 15 Dec. 2 kw 



38 23 Dec. 16 kv 



16 Dec. 5 kw 



302 $33,035 $9,360 



880 $82,000" $196,000 



740 $100,450 $48,000 



Hawaiian Bestg. System KHBC 

J. Howard Worrall, pres. 
C. Richard Evans, v.p. 
& gen. magr. 



Sunbury Bcstg. Corp. 
Harry H Haddon. pres. 
Basse A. Beck, tres 
George S. Beck. v.p. 

Southwest Oregon Tv 

Bcstg. Corp. 
Noble B. Goettel. pres 
John T. Pierce, v.p. 



WROK 



U.S. stations on air, incl. 
Honolulu and Alaska (1 Jan. 
•55) 

Markets covered 



420 
252 



BOX SCORE 



Post-freeze c.p.'s granted (ex- 
cluding 34 educational grants; 
1 Jan. '55) _ 
Grantees on air 



583' 
312 



Tv homes in U. S. (1 Nm 

'54) 32,262.000§ 

U.S. homes with tv sets (1 

Nov. '54) 70.7 "„•: 



oth new c.p.'s and nations going on the air listed here are. those which occurred between 
Dec. and 1 Jan. or on which Information could be obtained in that period St axioms are 
sldered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. "Effective radiated power. Aural 
■ er usually li one-half the visual power. •••Antenna height above average terrain (not 
<ve ground), t Information on the number of seta In markets where not designated as being 
o NBC Research, consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed approil- 
te. IDats from NBC Research and Planning. Percentages based on homes with sets and 
Bet In tv coverage areas are considered approximately. Jin most cases, the representative of a 
lo station which Is granted a c.p. also represents the new tv operation. Since ax presstlxna 



It Is generally too early to confirm tv representatives of most grantees. SPONSOR lists the 
reps of the radio stations In this column (when a radio station has been given the tv grant). 
NFA: No figures available at presatlme on sets In market. 

iThls number Includes grants lo permltees who have since surrendered their c.p.'s or whe have 
had Hum voided by FCC. -Station a is<, will be able to cover, within Its Grade II contour, Lake 
Worth. Palm Beach, Port Lauderdale, Ilollywnod and Miami. I'la. »18 *\ •■ 

yet on air. ^Station would duplicate i Kc;Mlt TV, Honolulu, Applicant operates 

K<:mp. \m TV. "Most of equipment would he bought from WCHA TV, Chamberaburg. Pa. 
^Station would be satellite of KII.W. TV. Eugene. Ore KVAJ T\ .ins Sl^ of applicant firm 



10 JANUARY 1955 



59 



TV ADVERTISERS ALL OYER THE MAP ARE SH 



#- 



^ 



f) 






ITTLE MARKETS, STATE and REGIONAL AREAS 



F plus many more, will sell with 'The Eddie Cantor Comedy Theatre' 



[ STORES 
i Colo. 

I TINE'S ALE 

t Me. 

I), Me. 

| ven, Conn. 

pee, R. I. 

i Mass. 

v ;hington, N. H. 

|.iron, N. Y. 

N. Y. 

\ N. Y. 
; :tady, N. Y. 

e, N. Y. 
>ld, Mass. 

jrg, Pa. 

»r, Pa. 
I phia, Pa. 
\ Jarre, Pa. 
I gton, D. C. 
I'. Va. 

Fla. 
\ rsburg, Fla. 



SEGO MILK 

Butte, Mont. 
Great Falls, Mont. 
Boise, Idaho 
Idaho Falls, Idaho 

CONTINENTAL OIL 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 
Butte, Mont. 
Billings, Mont. 

DREWRY'S BEER 

Chicago, III. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Elkhart, Ind. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Detroit, Mich. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Lansing, Mich. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Toledo, Ohio 

KULA-TV 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

KFDA-TV 

Amarillo, Tex. 



PRICE CREAMERIES 



WALL BROKERAGE 
COMPANY 

Greenville, S. C. 

ASSOCIATED GROCERS 
FOOD STORES 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

DR. PEPPER 

Roanoke, Va. 

FT. PITT BREWING 

Huntington -Charles- 
ton, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Steubenville, Ohio 
Youngstown, Ohio 
Johnstown, Pa. 

CROWN ZELLERBACH 
PAPER PRODUCTS 

Colorado Springs, 

Colo. 
Pueblo, Colo. 
El Paso, Tex. 
Albuquerque, N. M. 
Honolulu, Hawaii 

WMIN-TV 

Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
Minn. 




BLATZ BREWING 
COMPANY 

Eau Claire, Wise. 
Green Bay, Wise 
La Crosse, Wise. 
Madison, Wise. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
Neenah, Wise. 
Wausau, Wise. 

FORD DEALERS 

Abilene, Tex. 
Dallas, Tex. 
Lubbock, Tex. 
Midland, Tex. 
San Angelo, Tex. 
Temple-Waco, Tex. 
Tyler, Tex. 
Wichita Falls, Tex. 

JAX BEER 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

Louisiana 

part of Alabama 

COHEN FURNITURE CO. 

Peoria, III. 

JACOB'S PHARMACY 

Atlanta, Ga. 



ESTES DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

Rochester, Minn. 

GRIESEDIECK BREWING 

Kansas City, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

BROWN DISTRIBUTE 

Columbia, S. C. 

KOB-TV 

Albuquerque, N. M. 

SOUTHLAND PROVISION 

Columbia, S. C. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Florence, S. C. 

ROCHESTER MILK 
PRODUCTS ASSN. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

FISHER BROS. 
SUPERMARKETS 

Cleveland, Ohio 

WIEDEMANN BEER 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Columbus, Ohio 
Dayton, Ohio 



Hurry! 

Your market 
may be 
snapped up 
soon. So 
write, wire 
or phone 
now! 




ON THE AIR FROM 7A.M. TO 1A.M. 




62 



SPONSOR 



FILM PREDICTIONS 

(Continued jrom page 39) 

ABC Film Syndication, George T. 
Shupert, president: "This will be the 
year when the men get separated from 
the boys in the film syndication indus- 
try. There'll be a great variety of 
good product available for both day- 
time and nighttime use and competi- 
tion will be the keenest ever. 

"We at ABC Film Syndication have 
developed a production formula which 
will enable us to offer top quality day- 
time programs at very attractive 
prices. In addition we expect to intro- 
duce in 1955 at least three other new 
properties, each of which is distinc- 
tive from anything on the market to- 
day. And we anticipate continued suc- 
cess for our top-rated properties like 
Passport to Danger and Racket Squad. 

"Some film syndicators will have to 
close their doors in the coming year 
and although we personally will be 
sorry to see them go we know that 
the elimination of any but the most 
substantial companies eventually will 
strengthen the prestige of the entire 
industry and help to stabilize it. 

"This year will be a hard-sell year 
but we look forward with great eager- 
ness because we know it will be a year 
of great forward strides and profits 
for both our customers and ourselves." 

* * * 

CBS Television Film Sales Inc., Fred 
Mahlstedt, director of operations: 
"This year looks really good. Look- 
ing backward for a moment, I might 
say that 1954 was the best year in the 
history of CBS Film. Sales in 1954 
were up more than 200% over 1953. 

"This year we plan for expansion in 
our sales staff, promotion and public- 
ity operations. And we expect a great 
expansion in the number of new pro- 
grams we'll have to offer; there'll 
probably be at least four or five." 

* * * 

Guild Films Co., Reub Kaufman, 
president: "We look forward with 
triple confidence to 1955 — confidence 
in the increasing role of film pro- 
graming in television, confidence in 
the further expansion of the tv me- 
dium and confidence in our own fur- 
ther growth. 

"All of which adds up to increased 
employment of stars, technicians and 
related workers and greater prosper- 
ity for everyone in the industry. 

"Syndicated film now is entering its 
sixth year. It really went big time 
last year. It's now grown up in every 
respect — programing, sponsorship and 
number of stations. It grew rapidly, 
but it grew on a sound economic basis. 

"Our own production budget for 



1955 has been fixed at about $12 mil- 
lion. Our shows now are telecast more 
than 500 times weekly to a cumula- 
tive audience estimated at 90 million 
people. 

"Guild Films' gross contracts with 
sponsors, agencies and tv stations grew 
to nearly $5 million in 1954, compared 
with $1.7 million for 1953. Our per- 
sonnel grew to 356 last year compared 
with 77 in 1953. The number of our 
offices throughout the country doubled 
to 10 last year. 

"In addition to the programs al- 
ready under contract, at least three 
new half-hour shows and two new 
quarter-hour daytime shows will be 
launched early this year. 

"Our steady growth and the growth 
of the film field is impressive, but it 
doesn't mean there's any conflict be- 
tween live network shows and us. 
There's plenty of room for everyone in 

tv entertainment." 

* * * 

MCA Tv, Ltd., David V. Sutton, vice 
president and board member: "The 
year 1955 will be one of expansion and 
leadership for MCA Tv Film Syndica- 
tion Division. Distributing 22 quality 
tv film properties — the largest catalog 
in syndication — MCA Tv now has the 
largest sales staff in the television film 
industry, working from 19 offices in 
the United States, plus foreign offices 
in Canada, Great Britain and France. 

"New departments have been set up 
for station program sales and mer- 
chandising licensing during 1955. Lo- 
cal and regional advertisers will be 
serviced by a vastly expanded sales 
promotion campaign. 

"The MCA Tv sales staff, with one 
of the most extensive and well-bal- 
anced rosters of tv film properties now 
being offered, will make 1955 a nota- 
ble and record year." 

• • • 

Motion Pictures for Television, Ed- 
ward D. Madden, vice president and 
general manager: "This year will mark 
the survival of the fittest in syndicat- 
ed film programing. More than 250 
different syndicated film programs are 
on the air and the get-rich-quick film 
producers may find it almost impossi- 
ble to give away shows during the 
coming 12 months. In addition to the 
250 film programs on the air, sales- 
men for another 100 shows are knock- 
ing at the doors of prospective spon- 
sors. The result: The 25 best pro- 
grams — best in story, production, cast- 
ing — will continue to find ready mar- 
kets at fair prices while the medio- 
cre-to-poor programs will mold in 
film vaults. 

"The pressure for new and better 
programs in 1955 will continue to 
parallel the proved sponsor-and-audi- 



LjJential 



Co 



verag,e 



! 



UNDUPLICATED! 



WWOR-TV. CH. 14 
serves and sells 



WORCESTER 
COUNTY 




Now, Over 71,000 UHF sets 
Receive the Best Picture on 
Worcester County's Only 
TELEVISION STATION! 

"As of January 1, 1955 



see PAUL H. RAYMER CO. 

WW® JUT ^ 

1ST STATION IN NEW ENGLAND'S NO. 3 MAKKIT 
A BC — DUMONT 



■■Specialized 
Programming 

REACHES, 
SELLS 

Us IW\es B\G 
350,000 Negro WaiW 

joe Adams 

ffeglTspirU- 
uals). 



W: 



ll!i 



J 



10,000 WATTS 

Transmitter: Los Angeles, California 
Executive Offices: Santa Monica, California 

National Representatives: 
Forjoe & Co. New York, Chicago, 

Dallas, San Francisco 
Dora-Clayton Atlanta, Georgia 

GEORGE A. BARON, Gon'l Mgr. 



10 JANUARY 1955 



63 



WSAU-Tv 



WAUSAU, WISCONSIN 



ABC • DuMont 



CHANNEL 7 
89,800 watts 

1,921ft. above sea level 
540,000 population 

$662,899,000 

spendable income 
152,000 homes 

Represented by 
MEEKER, TV. 

New York. Chi.. Los Angeles. San Fran 



Stockholders Include 
RADIO STATIONS 

WSAU WFHR-WATK 
NEWSPAPERS: 

Wausau Daily Record-Herald 
Marshficld News Herald 
Wis. Rapids Daily Tribune 

Merrill Daily II. i aid 

i; in in 'i.i i i'ii i Dail) News 
Antigo Daily Journal 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

WISCONSIN VALLEY TELEVISION CORP. 



ence-pleasing performances of new 
programs like Sherlock Holmes and 
Janet Dean, R.N." 



NBC Film Division, Carl M. Stanton, 
v.p. charge Film Division : "We look for- 
ward to 1955 as the year in which new 
syndicated film programs of fine qual- 
ity — derived from both network tv film 
programs and from packages produced 
especially for syndication — will open 
up new opportunities for local, region- 
al and national sponsors, for the syn- 
dicators themselves and for the tv 
stations all over the country. 

"I think 1955 will probably be the 
most decisive year in film syndication 
which in the past two years has grown 
faster than it did in its entire pre- 
vious history. 

"While the industry has grown up 
it has not really settled down — and 
several major problems remain to be 
solved before it reaches a respectable 
maturity. 

"The most urgent of these problems, 
we of the NBC Film Division believe, 
is the current wave of price cutting 
and short term deals which threatens 
to engulf many film syndicators and 
degrade their programs. 

"We hope 1955 is the year in which 
this problem is solved." 

* # * 

Official Films, Inc., Harold L. Hack- 
et, president: "With the tremendous 
upsurge in our business here at Offi- 
cial Films, we see a new peak for syn- 
dication in 1955. 

"Sponsors heretofore confining their 
advertising dollars to print media or 
radio are realizing that syndicated 
programs of top quality result in great 
sales impact for their products. 

"Syndication continues to open big- 
ger and bigger markets for consumer 
goods and services, resulting in an at- 
mosphere we feel will be increasingly 
bullish." 

* * # 

Screen Gems, Inc., Ralph M. Colin, 
vice president and general manager: 
"In 1955 the film syndication indus- 
try will continue to expand and grow 
in stature. Increased competition will 
force improvement in the quality of 
films for television. This also will be 
the year in which the last of the bor- 
derline and amateur producers will 
disappear from the business. 

Tt will mark the growth of Class A 
film syndicators who will turn out 
products comparable to network pro- 
ductions." 

* « * 

Sterling Television Co., Saul J. Tu- 
rell, president: "Our aim is to heavily 
increase sales in 1955. We're definite- 
ly out for a bigger share of the market. 
In order to increase business, we're go- 
ing to offer 12 separate ideas, or pro- 
grams, to sponsors and stations. All 
these shows — which will embrace 
women's shows, children's shows and 
so forth — are planned for an across- 
the-board scheduling. We believe in 
the across-the-board concept, daytime 
as well a ' nighttime. 

"Whal we'll be selling this year will 
be programing, not shows. 

"We wanl to help stations solve 
their programing problems, not with 
one- hoi ingle shows but with a com- 
plete package of program 



Television Programs of America, 
Michael M. Sillerman, sales manager: 
"The tv film companies that deserve 
to maintain their competitive position 
in the field in 1955 must offer a di- 
versity of properties. 

"When a salesman makes a call, the 
prospective client should have no trou- 
ble in identifying the show being of- 
fered from the property he bought 
three months before. 

"We feel that part of our success is 
based on the diversity of our proper- 
ties — Ramar of the Jungle is the only 
jungle show on the air; The Halls of 
Ivy is notable for its high level of 
urbanity and sophistication." 

* * * 

Unity Television, Arche Mayers, gen- 
eral manager: "A lot of things are 
going to change this year. As the last 
100 to 150 stations which have gone 
on the air iron out their problems, 
they can see clearer. Their objectives 
won't be so obscure. They'll know what 
they want and need in programing. 

"The second big point: More and 
more stations find they can't live on 
the network rate card. They're buying 
more film programing so they'll be 
able to get 100 cents on the dollar for 
selling the show, rather than 33'. •. 
cents on the dollar they get from the 
network. 

"Generally speaking, we found an 
improved sales position in 1954. 

"We set a $6 million sales objective 
for 1955. In the past 10 days we've 
gotten $270,000 in new contracts." 
* * * 

Ziv Television Programs, Inc., John 
L. Sinn, president: "This year Ziv will 
double the total product being distrib- 
uted as of the end of 1954. 

"And we're going to sign more top 
names in the entertainment world to 
star in the new programs. The trend 
in syndicated tv film today is toward 
starring top names in order to pro- 
vide instant audience appeal. 

"In addition. Ziv will continue to 
follow its policy of filming properties 
such as Mr. District Attorney and 
Meet Corliss Archer, both of which are 
among the oldest radio programs. 

"Ziv's gross volume over the past two 
years has increased two-and-a-half 
times. At present three Ziv shows are 
nearing the 200-market point. Anoth- 
er is in 170 markets. Two others are 
in more than 135 markets and the 
Eddie Cantor Comedy Theatre, al- 
though on the market for only eight 
weeks, has been sold in more than 
125 markets. 

"An expansion in the sales force is 
being planned to meet this increased 
production. And we also plan to great- 
ly expand our foreign distribution. 

"Lastly, in order to double our pro- 
duction in 1955. we spent $1.4 million 
for American National Studios (for- 
merly Eagle-Lion I . in Los Angeles. 
The studios are one of the major pro- 
ducing facilities on the West Coast. 

"They'll give us more than twice as 
much space as we've had with our 
present California studios. 

"Our 1955 production budget will be 
$9.5 million. New shows will include 
panel programs, situation comedies, 
musical comedies, dramatic programs 
and science-fiction pieces." * * * 



64 



SPONSOR 






w 



a <AjuxA*&sMMJua'' 





*It's Navy tradition that a broom be secured to the mast 
of a victorious ship returning to port, indicating a clean 
sweep of all her opponents. 



The September, 1954 Telepulse survey in the Wheeling-Steubenville market 
gives WTRF-TV a clean sweep in every category. Not only were the top 25 most popular programs 
on WTRF-TV, but 63.5% of the viewing audience between noon and midnight were tuned to WTRF-TV, 
Wheeling. This, Friends, is known as dominating a market, not just slightly but so predominantly 
that there can be no question that the only way to reach this billion dollar market is with WTRF-TV. 
And here are the reasons for this overwhelming domination: 



1. WTRF-TV's 316,000 watts on channel 7 delivers a clearer, sharper 
signal all hours of the day and night. 

2. NBC programming, supplemented by ABC shows, topped off by 
WTRF-TV's own programs designed especially for the viewers in this market 
are obviously what most people want most of the time. 

3. Constant promotion and untiring publicity keep reminding viewers of 
WTRF-TV, the BIG station in the Wheeling-Steubenville market. 



If you are interested in selling this important market, call any Hollingbery office or 
Bob Ferguson, VP and general manager direct at Wheeling 1177. 



WTRF-TV 

WHEELING, W. VA. 

CHANNEL 7 • 316,000 WATTS 

NBC Primary . ABC Supplementary 

Represented by Hollingbery 

Robt. Ferguson . VP & Gen. Mgr. 

Telephone WHeeling 1177 
Now equipped for network color 



10 JANUARY 1955 



65 



CHANNEL (J) 
ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 



THE (tody STATION 
COVERING THE 

ROCKFORD-MADISON 
AREA MARKET 



OVER 

t.000.000 

PEOPLE IN THE 

FIRST g*^ MARKET 

,WEST OF CHICAGO 



WRITE FOR 

WREX-TV 

COVERAGE MAP 

Showing this tremendous 
.non-duplicated CBS Coverage 



CBS -ABC NETWORK 
AFFILIATIONS 

45,700 Watts E. R. P. 

represented by 
,H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



f WREX-TV 

fH IS" 

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 




(Continued from page 6) 

When Mr. Henry Ford the first made the comment, "They 
can have my car in any color they want just as long as it's 
black," he had the good fortune to be talking to the sex that is 
usually reticent to argue and conservative to a fault. The 
present two-tone pastels, the rakish lines as well as lush in- 
teriors, can be attributed solely to the ladies for that's what as 
well as who created the demand. Men lost this battle the day 
they let women put flowers in the vases of the old Mercer. So 
today there are car ads in Vogue and Harper's and the car 
copy in general books is slanted toward the Mrs. while dam- 
sels deliver a good many of our tv and radio commercials. 

As for the medium itself, from early morning to the chil- 
dren's hour is ladies' day in television; this is as true less ob- 
viously at night but just as surely. 

Other than a few programs such as Gillette's Cavalcade of 
Sports, Canadian Football and Featherweight Boxing Fiestas, 
there is hardly a show in which women viewers do not out- 
number the men. The norm is about 45% to 31%, variations 
depending upon the time slot, type of program, feed-in. Com- 
petition and so on. Whodunit or quiz, comedy or musical, 
spectacular or unspectacular, the weaker sex is there in force. 

Thus if you accept the premise that women in addition to 
doing the buying do the deciding in the vast majority of pur- 
chases made; if you have learned either through statistics or 
by slyly watching your wife that there is scarcely an area in 
which she doesn't cast the only ballot thai counts, it will 
gratify you as an advertising man to discover that television 
offers a predominance of this dominant sex. Sir. do not be 
disgruntled as you watch the medium, replete as it is with 
bumbling husbands (Desi, Ozzie, Stu, Barry, Ray, Danny, 
Hill el al.). Don't gnash your teeth or lose any sleep over the 
fatale of tv femmes and the wisdom of i\ wives. Just keep in 
mind that tv is a woman's world in the very same wa\ thai the 
world i- a woman's l\ screen. * * * 



Letters to Rob Foreman are welcomed 

Do you always agree with tin- opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
presses in "Agency Ad Libs?" Bob and the editors of SPON- 
SOR would be happy to receive and print comments from 
readers. Iddress Bob Foreman, c o SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 St. 



66 



SPONSOR 



T. WASHINGTON TV 




"Best darn salesman I've ever seen! 



>t 



And Mt. Washington TV is "the 
best darn salesman you 've ever 
seen!" No wonder the sponsors of 
Disneyland, Jackie Gleason, Climax 
and Shower of Stars ... to mention 



a few, have been sold on the Moun- 
tain. It reaches most of Maine, New 
Hampshire and Vermont at about 
half the cost of any other 3 TV sta- 
tions in the area combined. 



CBS-ABC 



WMTW 



Channel 8 



John H. Norton, Jr., Vic* Pros, and General Manager REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HARRINGTON, RIGHTER A PARSONS, Inc. 



10 JANUARY 1955 



67 



BOOK 



SPONSOR: Viiih American Stevens Co. 



AG! \i \ ; Direcl 



I APS1 I I I ASI HISTORY : To promote its car book in 
the Los Ingeles area the \orth American Stevens Co. 
bought \S-minute e.t's on Sunday evenings for jour 
weeks. Orders started pouring in so fast tlmt one com- 
pan) official, Mi. E. Schwartz, said. "K\.\ gave us our 
lowest order costs of any station used dining our cam- 
paign. Orders keep coming in even from repeats on the 
same time spots." Program cost $\() i ). , )~i a neck. Is a 
result, \orth American has started a [3-weeft series on 
k \ \ this month i .lanutii • \ I . 



k\\. I i 



An J 



FROCK AM: !."> minute e.t.'s 




results 



KITCHEN UNITS 



IPONSOR: Mai 



Flillllliilli: C 



AGENCi : Di 



< APS1 II I ASE HISTORY: / guessing contest on ra- 

dio pulled 17..''> 1 2 prospects for the Mabee Plumbing Co. 
I 20'OCre pumpkin field was selected and contestants 
were asked to guess the number of pounds to be har- 
vested from d. (dues were displayed in the Mabee shmt ■ 
room and 78 announcements it ere run over II I'YA). Cost 
a ns ^7.li."> an announcement. After the contest the sales 
staff uent to work on the mailing list compiled from the 
postcard ansa as. Months later, sides are still coming 
into the \lubcc Co. for their kitchen installation units as 
a result of the contest. 



WPEO, I' 



III 



FROCK \M: Announcements 



HOISTS 



SPONSOR: Harsh Hydraulic Hoisl ( ... AGEN< ^ : Direcl 

' APSUL1 < ASE HISTORY: A VZ-weeh radio campaign 
provided valuable follow-up leads for the Harsh Hy- 
draulu Hoist t ". / sing earl) morning radio, the com- 
pany scheduled five announcements pa week, tnnounce- 
ments u • n geared towards mousing enough listenei 
interest i<< request a booklet on hoists. Farmers were 

told that for \(» a du\ thc\ could unload harvest and 

olhei farm products uitli the I hush hydraulic hoist ami 

</ pick-up, tiailei io tun I. ( Company received 650 "■- 

guests foi booklets. On follow-up calls sin hoists were 

sold ami 3] jici sons indicated interest, tverage • "\/ per 

hoisl is $300; /<</<// <ost <</ sponsorship mis $1,625. 

KOA Denver PROGB AM W. stern Bn-.kl si B 

inn. .i'ii. emenl • 






; ; 



















































































































TRACTORS 



>PO\SOH Manning-Westbrook [ruck AGENCY: Dimtjl 

& Tractor Co. 

CAPSULE < W HISTORY: A single mention about J 
used tractoi buy brought 30 walk-in inquiries to thi 

Manning-ll eslbrook Truck & Tractor Co. The companyM 
a local International-Harvester dealer, co-sponsors a 15 j 
minute program of religious music three times a nee}.. 
Program. Harvest of Hymns, has brought numerous 
advertising and sales promotions successes to the sponsor J I 
com pain reports. Cost per program to Manning-^ est- 
brook is SI. ^i>oiim>i calls its radio advertising budget] 
"the best money we ever spent." 



W BAW, Barnwell, S. I . 



FROCK AM: Harvest of Hym 



FLOUR 






SPONSOR: Quaker Oats Co. 
I APS1 I I ( VSE HISTORY : 



AG! M Y: Clinton E. Frank I ... 
/// an effort to increase 
sales for Aunt Jemima Self-Rising Flour in the Veil 
) orh area, the Quaker Oats Co. launched a radio cam- 
paign. II ith two daily programs on II II l\F. Dm \\ heel- 
ei - Morning Spirituals and Dr. }\\e. in the afternoon 
i three \S-minute segments a week each), sales soared 
"considerably" in a year's time. Cost was $250 a neck. 
WWRL anil the Ouaket Oats t o. started a joint mer- 
chandising campaign using window displays, posters. 
counter cards and contests. In one contest station re- 
ceived 0.000 requests joi a free record. 

WWRL, New York PROGRAM: Do. Wheeler's M 

Spirituals; Dr. ,li\> 



DRY GOODS STORES 



SPONSOR: Cookeville Dn G I- Assn. 



\OI \< , i : Direcl 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Habits can be changed H 
radio. It's customary for the dry goods shops in Cooke- 

i illc to close on II cdncsdin afternoons. This year the 
group of stores decided to remain open on the II ednes- 
da\ afternoon before Thanksgiving. \nl Limiting it hat 
to expect, the stores bought air announcements to run 
only on Tuesday and Wednesday, spending just $50. 
Fiery store in town reported brisk business. One start 
did five times the volume of business it had done on tin 
corresponding II ednesday last year: another reported a 
volume seven times greater. 



Will H. CookevUle, 'Fun. 



PROGRAM: \n 



inn. n< 'i ■iiu-iil- 



BLANKETS 



SPONSOR: Crown Furniture Store AGENCY: Dirfl 

< APSUL1 < ASI HISTORY: Crown Furniture Store de- 
cided /" test radio pull with n special Sunt/a\ morning 
telephone promotion on 90 blankets it hail in stock. Start 

bought eight announcements for 7 \ member . Blanket 
sob! for sT.77 and were available foi 77< down and s l 
a week, t number .»/ special operators were placet! in 

the store tO take calls. By afternoon the 90 blankets in 

slock were completely sob/ out and oo more had to at 
ordered from Itlanta. Store also opened 5 1 ncii accounts 

ns n dual icsuli ol the radio promotion. The cost to 
sponsor was $36 and netted company $1,398.60 sales 
in one day . 



\\k AB, Mi 



PROGR AM: Announcemeii 



UJERD 



ATLANTA'S TOP INDEPENDENT 
MOVES GOODS FAST IN THIS 
$100 MILLION MARKET 



The WBRD listening audience 

predominantly made up of the 

290,000 Negroes in the WERD 

coverage area, is responsive, 

loyal and partial to the 

specially-designed programming 

of this Negro-owned and managed 

1000-watt outlet 

More and more national 

advertisers are discovering 

that the magic formula for top 

sales in one of America's 

top markets is 



UJERD 



AMERICA'S FIRST NEGRO- 
OWNED RADIO STATION 

860 kc 1,000 watts 

H'idio Division — Interstate United Newspaper, Inc. 

Represented Nationally By JOE WOOTTON 

J. B. blayton. jr.. General Manager 




10 JANUARY 1955 



69 



■■■■■«% 



•v < ■ 



Some folks count sheep. 
Storer Broadcasting Company, however, counts years 
of service in the public interest. And 
pledges to expend every effort to make 1 955 

as memorable as the twenty-seven Storer years 



*' " / 



that have turned the bend of memory. 




ra ea 



V"t«V 









^^Vwt 



' --• :«rt 



■ 






9 






. -Mtti 



** -2. * ~ 



•*. 




>* 



*'» T 



4.'.^Pfrf2 



*WTri 



WSPD • WSPD-TV 
Toledo, Ohio 

WJW • WXEL-T 




ROADCASTING COMPA 

KPTV WA6A • WAGA-TV WJBK • WJBK-TV 

Portland, Ore. Atlanta, Ga. Detroit, Mich. 



WSPD • WSPD-TV KPTV WA6A • WAGA-TV WJBK • WJBK-TV 

Portland, Ore. Atlanta, Ga. Detroit, Mich. 

'WBRC • WBRC-TV WWVA WGBS • WGBS- 

■Mrmingham, Ala. Wheeling, W. V' 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 

TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Sales Mgr. 

1 1 8 E. 57th St., New York 22, ELdorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 , Franklin 2-6498 



WGBS -WGBS-TV 
Miami, Fla. 






m 



TO SELL 
JACKSONVILLE 

(and the rich Northeast 
Florida market . . .) 




WJHP-TV 

Channel 36 



§ § § 

76,500 UHF SETS-IN-USE 

§ § § 

ABC • NBC • DuMONT 
Television Networks 

§ § § 

For rates, availabilities, and oth- 
er information, call Jacksonville 
EX 8-9751 or New York MU 
7-5047. 



§ § § 



WJHP-TV 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

276,000 watts 

on Channel 36 

Represented nationally by 
John II. Parry Associates 




agency profile 



Curt A. Peterstm 



V.p. and radio-tv director 
Marschalk and Pratt Division, McCann-Erickson, New York 

Curt Peterson is a tall, silver-haired man who looks as though 
he d be at ease on either side of the footlights or a tv camera. And. 
as a matter of fact, he has been. Some 30 years ago, when he came 
to New York from the University of Oregon, he started out as a 
singer. 

"I studied voice in pretty good company. Peterson recalls. "Two 
of my fellow voice students were Thomas Dewev and my wife." 

Curt Peterson himself married a theater actress, Ruth Matteson. 
Mrs. Peterson, of course, continued her acting career, including 
numerous Broadway and tv shows. She's currently appearing in 
Sailor's Delight with Eva Gabor. 

"The show's supposed to hit Broadway sometime in January," 
Peterson added. 

Peterson's own work is entirely confined to the other side of the 
mike or tv camera today. As head of the radio-tv department of 
Marschalk and Pratt, Peterson has been particularly busy with two 
spot accounts: Esso Standard Oil and International Nickel. 

"To date, our merger with McCann-Erickson has not affected this 
department." Peterson explained. The merger, which occurred early 
in January, is unusual in agency history in so far as Marschalk 
and Pratt Division of McCann-Erickson is expected to continue 
operating independently at the job of servicing the accounts already 
within the shop. It's likely that McCann-Erickson -vn ill eventually 
push some of its own industrial accounts through Marschalk and 
Pratt, since t lie latter is particularly heavy in industrial accounts. 

"Biggest problem with spot radio and tv accounts is the setting 
and insuring of certain standards of performance on the various 
stations," says Peterson. In the case of Esso alone, this means 
policing some 53 radio and 18 tv stations. 

Peterson has devised a system that both the clienl and Nations 
like: Ever) station is supplied with a booklet "I instructions and 
suggestions, rhese booklets include the agency - reasoning behind 
a certain approach to programing and commercials for the client. 
Thej also include instructions about the format of the show I four 
dail) newa asts in the case of Esso), the deliver) ol the commercials, 
suggested camera angle- and emergency instructions, props, sets 
and color of sets, * * * 



12 



SPONSOR 



EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL RADIO REPRESENTATIVES: 



EAST 
SOUTHEAST 

WBZ + WBZA Boston + Springfield 

WGR Buffalo 

KYW Philadelphia 

KDKA Pittsburgh 

WFBL Syracuse 



5,000 



50,000 

50,000 

5,000 



Charleston, S. C. 
Charlotte 
Columbia, S. C. 
Raleigh — Durham 
Roanoke 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
50,000 
5,000 






P: 



PREE& JTETERS 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 



FOR LATEST INFORMATION, CALL 

NEW YORK 

250 Park Ave. 

Plaza 1-2700 



CHICAGO 

230 N. Michigan Ave. 

Franklin 2-6373 

ATLANTA 

Glenn lildg. 

Main 5667 

HOLLYWOOD 

63.il Hollywood Blvd. 

Hollywood 9-2151 



DETROIT 

Penobscot Bldg. 

Woodward 1-4255 

FT. WORTH 

406 W. Seventh St. 

Fortune 3349 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Russ Building 
Sutler 1-3798 



MIDWEST 
SOUTHWEST 



WDSM 



WDAY 
W0W0 



KMBC-KFRM 



WMBD 



WBAP 



MOUNTAIN 
AND WEST 



KGMB-KHBC 



Des Moines 

Davenport 

Duluth — Superior 

Fargo 

Fort Wayne 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City 

Omaha 

Peoria 

Beaumont 
Corpus Christi 
Ft. Worth— Dallas 
San Antonio 



Denver 

Honolulu — Hilo 
Portland 
Seattle 



NBC-ABC 



50,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

50,000 
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50,000 
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5,000 

1,000 

50,000 

50,000 



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50,000 




When She Talks... 

They Listen! 

NINA WRIGHT 

Packs her daily morning program with a wealth ol 
information, helpful to both urban and rural house- 
wives. Broadcast from her kitchen, Nina places 
major emphasis on the important subject of food. 
In addition, she trequently discusses other subjects 
of vital importance to women— fashion, good 
grooming, current events and civic affairs. Guest 
interviews are often a part of her interesting pro- 
grams. 




Several times each month. Nina Wright is invited 
to appear as featured speaker at area functions, or 
to give homemaking and cooking demonstrations. 
In towns and cities throughout KSOO's 60-County 
( overage Area this past summer, the average- 
attend, ime at a Nina Wright appearance was 24% 
of the total population. The only publicity used to 
attract housewives to these events were announce- 
ments in the "NINA WRIGHT SHOW" itself. Yes, 
when Nina Wright talks, homemakers listen. And 
when Nina Wright sells sour product, homemakers 
BUY! This popular KSOO ' Personalis Show 
draws listeners at a low cost per thousand of 
approximately * 1 3 cents. 

' based on Nielsen (overage Service Figures 

NINA WRIGHT SHOW 

10:25 A.M.— Mon. thru Fri. 

4> Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Nationally Clear Channel 1140 KC 
ABC Radio Affiliate 

10,000 WATTS DAYTIME 
5,000 WATTS NIGHTTIME 

Represented Notionally by Avcry-Knodel, Inc. 




{Continued from page 20) 

may say: "Hey, let's lay off that Kuick. They've got to get 
that $11,000,000 back some way, and they'll probably tack 
it on to the price of the car." 

Milton Berle performed somewhat the same kind of a ca- 
per when he made his National Broadcasting Company deal 
a few years ago. The general impression was created by 
stories Berle and his people planted that NBC was giving 
him the tube plant in Lancaster, the new studios in Burbank, 
the key to General Sarnoff's safety deposit vault and untold 
millions of dollars. Berle happily, during thai period, used 
the gag, "They're changing the name to the National Berle- 
casting Company." 

I was on Billboard at the time, and the then president of 
NBC, Joe McConnell, showed me the contracts — off the rec- 
ord, of course. It was a good deal for Berle, hut a fine deal 
for NBC, too. Berle's services as a guest on other show-, bis 
talents as a producer and many other elements were avail- 
able to NBC, all for the one over-all price. When the Glea- 
son-Buick deal winds up, I imagine the same situation will 
be true. 

What sponsor- or their agencies can do to check the en- 
thusiasms of fellows like my friend. Bullets. I don t knew. 
but it's something worth thinking about. On the -ubject of 
Gleason, I wonder about one other phase of sponsor-talent 
relationships. It wasn't too many years ago that Gleason 
was doing a show on Du Mont. I went on his show one night 
to give Eddie Fisher (whom we were then kicking off at 
l\C\ Victor) an award. It didn't take a -bowman genius 
to recognize that Gleason had a fresh, driving, tireless talent, 
which, properly developed, could give a tv advertiser a top 
-bow. I'm pretty sure Buick, or any other advertiser, could 
have made a long-term deal with Jackie at that point, at con- 
siderably less than they're making the deal now. Even if it 
isn't $1 1.000,000. 

What I mean i-: Why don't advertisers or their agencies 
spend a little more time having people with experience and 
background canvass newer, as yet not-at-the-lop talent, but 
talent with potential and build with them, to the top? Con- 
sidering the importance of their tv properties to the advert- 
ing programs of the nation"- biggest linn-, il would seem to 
me this might be considered a legitimate pari of their devel- 
opment program, even as they develop -ale-, manufacturing 
and other internal talent. 



• • • 



74 



SPONSOR 




Agency and client • 

behind closed doors • 
chopping on the schedule • 
your medium, your market 
are mentioned • a question 



is raised • the agency man 
reaches for Standard Rate . . . 



Brother, what a grand feeling to know that 



in a Service-Ad near your listing. 



For the full story on the values 1.161 media pot from their 
Service-Ads, see Standard Rate's own Service-Ad in the 
front of all SRDS monthly editions; or call a Standard Rate 
Service-Salesman. 

Note: According to a study of SRDS use made by National Analysts, 
Inc., 83% of all account men interviewed have SRDS available at 
meetings in clients' offices. 








o o o 



a forum on questions of current interest 
to air tidvertisers and their agencies 



Should it client worry if the critics pan his show?" 




THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

CRITICS' PAN NO BLOCK 

By Roland Martini 

V.P.. Radio-Tv Director 

Gardner Advertising. New York 

That's a little like 
asking how a fa- 
ther feels when 
his son comes 
home with a 
black eye. If it's 
just a black eye 
and there are no 
broken bones, 
and the boy 
shows no apparent psychic trauma, 
the old man might ignore the whole 
thing with a "boys will be boys" . . . 
or he might stop long enough to tell 
junior not to lead with his right. 

However, if the boy has been set 
upon and beaten up so severely that 
he needs hospitalization, parental con- 
cern will manifest itself right to the 
local precinct for immediate action. 

When a high percentage of critics 
pan a show during its first two or 
three weeks on the air, the assault may 
star! a panicky chain reaction. The 
panning will bother the agency, the 
'Mint, the board of directors, the star-. 
I In- network, the time salesman . . . 
and, armed with this high-percentage 
report, the agents, packagers, competi- 
i"i- will move in like morticians. Un- 
der these unfortunate circumstances, 
the whole business could become a 
rout. 

Happily, such a grisly thing rarely 
happens. Critics, like ratings, display 
\ii\ little unanimity. In some instances 
when there has been a high percentage 
• ■I negative critical reaction, this has 
not deterred the public, the « lients, or 
the networks from proceeding. 

A < Jassic example is the Today 
show. Man) critics ridiculed it as 



"Weaver's Folly" when it went on the 
air in 1952. I understand that Today- 
grossed about $9,000,000 in 1954. 
What a beautiful folly! 

The record also shows a consider- 
able coolness on the part of the critics 
to the spectaculars, yet the Nielsen 
Index reports that each of these spe- 
cial one-shot programs has been seen 
by an audience of more than 31,000.- 
000 viewers, and each has thus ranked 
among the top 10 programs on tv. 

On the other hand, there is a show 
now being sponsored that has consis- 
tently received high praise from the 
critics. Beautifully written, produced, 
and acted, its rating is so pitifully low 
that in spite of the wonderful reviews, 
this show will fold up its sets and 
depart with the new year. What wor- 
ried the client here was not the critics, 
but the high cost-per-1,000 viewers. 
Unfortunately, the critics were ready 
for the show but the viewers were not. 
In fact, the warm praise from the 
• ritics was responsible for keeping the 
show on the air for over a year, in the 
forlorn hope that it would break 



If the critics say "Nay!" 

How important are the crit- 
ics' reviews of a new air show 
to a sponsor? According to 
sponsor's panel of agency ex- 
ecutives, the influence of the 
radio and tv critics is limited, 
though they do play a valua- 
ble role in the launching of a 
new program. Negative re- 
views won't ruin a show, the 
panel agrees; positive reviews 
can help build a show but 
can t make it a successful ve- 
hicle. Willi l\. the audience 
has a chance to be its own 
critic, and in its hands lies 
the eventual fate of a show. 



through to the public. There w ; as no 
break. 

But not all is unpleasantness. There 
are happy occasions when the critics 
and the viewers discover a show simul- 
taneously. The critics are generous in 
their praise, the public tunes in, the 
client is happy, and the cost-per-1,000 
is a happy little figure. This seems 
like a dream situation — but one with 
substance. In fact, it has a name: the 
George Gobel Show. And happily, we 
have something to do with it. 



CANT MAKE OR BREAK SHOW 
By Read H. Wight 

V.P, and Director of Radio and 7Y 
J. M. Mathes Inc.. ISew York 

Just how worried 
a sponsor should 
be when critics 
pan his show de- 
pends on why 
they pan it. If. 
for instance, they 
pan it because it 
is in poor taste, 
then the sponsor 
has reason to be concerned. But gen- 
erally speaking, a negative reaction on 
the part of the critics is not going to 
demolish a program or have too great 
an effect on its eventual popularity 
lor lack of ill. Remember Abie's 
Irish Rose and Robert Bern hle\ ? 

A positive approach, on the other 
band, can be very effective in building 
a show. If John Crosby or Harriet 
\ an Home, for instance, say that such- 
and-such a show opened last night 
and was poor. I doubt if the average 
viewer would be impelled to view it; 
but if Crosby or Van Home enthusi- 
astically underwrite a program and 
say it's great, it's realistic, it has im- 
pact, see it — the chances are you will 
make a menial note to do so. Often, a 




76 



SPONSOR 



harsh attack on a favorite star builds 
a sympathetic audience. 

The radio and tv critics can't make 
or break an air show in the same 
sense as the Broadway show critics 
can affect a stage production. With 
tv, the shows are there for all to see, 
and everyone is his own critic — with 
the tune-out dial at his fingertips. But 
it is a different story when a person 
is considering spending perhaps $15 
for theatre tickets — he's only going to 
see that show once and he looks to 
the critics for guidance in helping 
him make up his mind. 

Some reviewers, in not liking a tv 
show, actually help improve it. They 
make specific remarks on what they 
did not like about it. which often help 
the creators of the show to strengthen 
the weak spots. My Little Margie is 
a case in point. 

Actually, there is no black or white 
to this question. Just as rating sys- 
tems are guideposts, so the reactions 
of critics may be valid guideposts in 
developing a show. A sponsor — and 
his agency — can't ignore any straw 
in the wind. 

PUBLICS OPINION PREVAILS 

By JSorman W. Glenn 

V.P., Director Broadcast Planning 

Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, 

IS. Y. 

He should worry 
only if the crit- 
ic's taste coin- 
cides with that of 
the general pub- 
lic — which is a 
backhanded way 
of saying that the 
critic's influence 
on the tuning 
habits of his readers is minor. 

On Broadway, things are different: 
the critics hold a life or death pow- 
er over new plays. The public relies 
on the judgment of play reviewers 
because theatre-going is expensive and 
inconvenient. 

But broadcasting is not Broadway. 
"Catching a new tv show'' costs nothing, 
and if the viewer doesn't like it, he 
can find other entertainment without 
leaving the room. Nowhere else in the 
entertainment world is it so easy for 
the public to sample new offerings and 
form its own opinions. 

Does this mean that the critic is 
completely without influence? Not 
(Please turn to page 97) 





Sponsors pile up winning seasons, one after the other, 
with WBNS. We've got loyal listeners (in faet . . . more 
listeners than all other loeal stations combined). Our fans 
stick with us through the TOP 20 PULSE-rated programs 
and follow through with record purchases of WBNS- 
advertised products. 



CBS for CENTRAL OHIO 




ASK 

JOHN BLAIR 



radio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



10 JANUARY 1955 



77 



1 st Telepulse in 

Sioux City, Iowa 

proves KYTV dominance 



Top 10 shows 

Top 23 shows 

24 out of top 25 



ARE ON KVTV 



All with a rating of 40 or better 



The week of November 8-14, Telepulse moved into 
Sioux City, Iowa, and conducted the first television 
survey in this "2nd largest" of Iowa's markets. The 
results show clearly that KVTV dominates completely. 



KVTV PULLS A 77 
SHARE-OF-AUDIENCE RATING 

Throughout the test week, Monday through Sunday, 
6 p.m. to midnight, KVTV rates a spectacular 77 in 
share of audience. Whether it's local-live, film or net- 
work, the dominant station in Sioux City is KVTV. 



Which all goes to show 

KVTV is the television buy in Siouxland 



Ask your Katz man for all the facts. 




SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

CBS ABC DUMONT 

A Cowles station. Don D. Sullivan, 
Advertising Director. Under same man- 
agement as WNAX-570, Yankton — in 
the land where radio reigns. 



78 



SPONSOR 



Nighttime 10 January 1955 

SUNDAY | MONDAY 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 

TUESDAY | WEDNESDAY 




■£?»»• L sjsss «*?,: " ■;;v-' ; v ^."SSjj,, '«£" »„„,„. ,*HL «-sw HS 3" -^-tS?" -m 3^""'; ■ss.'.sp ,™- r^as. '■£*>• i»- w£*a 

M_t_ o,u y "'u»JS;"' LI, :, B ;; 1 "' P "'"»» V oS"' eJ.^'pI"™ 3:!iV';,. "HI' '"" _ "tSST 1 '" R "»™""" ['""'»'■"«'"" f 1 "' *»'"■«» r.. aw . »«,.. <**" """"I „jy ■'"•;., ,g> T J;»; r „, „., .,.,,. — ' " r "'■"° n.. »i.. .a, !?cb <i».ooo jv„"""S!m, o'S oS.".'!; 

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DCSS ^ •''■*■ B&B i;a.oco JcS™«, 9 . 3 ll"«k? D j£ tH Bony'"!'.'-''' I E .l 110 000 ' W T »2 000 S S ^JoCT*''''*" ° r °« r ».i>Ine MNT T BONY '"' V "" T ' JHj P ^ •""••• J" 1 * 7 L | u™«T hide""" Wr^ttlog S nNt . OJ |.r 

"""" ***" """"I" «M-«» «u!«"i'^l£V " l> ° *"'"" BBI>0 "'■■"' S '"" ~" !< "> IWT 114,000 "»« ijj.ooS DFS IHOOO 1 "" •"■"» """ ... OtBJ X*. L " ■"" ™ """l. "'"a™ ."," .." ' ' 



l™t lltSO) 



- 



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t3lll 1ID.S00 



Dm Si«-i 

r aDri "* ,lo L 

11750 







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11:30 pm-1 am 

lime & MlMt 
I«400 



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*nd explanations to help you u*e (his churl 



.Sponsor* I'nted alphabet tc-u I ft; with uaenrw and (ii 













NT, N«* York: V«r. 


-, . 


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tli: rftli 


r»dio inJ T\ 


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l»ll 111 Itw 


'-'*' 


»niih»* 'm 


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1,0 Dirt or » 


■BC TV 



■ Ann. CM CBS. Th 3:4S-1 
' Pr" Blow: CBS. MP IS 1B-S' 

r } l'.-_.;li |,,„; \1 : .ii i:, t.r„ 1 



W. Sil*ty Ruor. D-I 



7:30- o pm; NBC, I 



Cork. DIIUO NUC 



n Co. iaii :.):<: Tti I 
4-Myor*. DCSS: CBS. 



KUDO NUC. V 9:30-10 Pm; CBS. 


futm5o er Kod,jJ< B TWT- • BC 


ii. Wuej: CB8, M 8-B.JO pm 


Fol'lhN" foo" 1 ' 'i ' '''' 










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1.1 Mil v., f ; 30-I5 pm 


Fra*l f » Corp.. PC*B: NBC, 

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Southern arithmetic 




This apparently zany addition is 
by no means meaningless. Within 
the far-flung limits of influence 
exerted by Atlanta's radio station 
WSB and television station WSB- 
TV are a given number of homes. 
This is ALL the homes there are in 
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plus WSB-TV and you reach them 
all. In the South no other combina- 
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W 



$b 



The Voice of the South 
750 KC 



wsb-fv 

The Great AREA station 

of the Southeast 

CHANNEL 2 



Represented by Edward Petry & Company — affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution 



10 JANUARY 1955 



85 




. : ■ : : :' '/ : ■ '- ; ' •■■'-■''■-. :■;':-:■:•:■ ■;■ ■>-;■:-:■; :■; : :■ 



Drew Pearson's taped show 

Drew Pearson, who docs more pre 
dieting than a ji \ j»s\ fortune teller, pre- 
dicted 20 months ago- when his radio 
show went from a live network produc- 
tion to a re :orded tape co-op show 
that the program would keep its au- 
dience. 

\t latest count last week some 270 
radio stations from coast to coast are 
carrying the show and Pearson sav- 
ins rating and audience response is 
greater than ever before. 

Type of sponsoi varies, hut the larg- 



sponsored on 270 stations 

est group are auto dealers. Apparel 
and department stores, banks and sav- 
ings \ loan associations, insurance 
agencies, household appliance and fur- 
niture stores follow in that order. 

Pearson says one example of the 
taped program's success is an incident 
that occurred in San Diego. The sta- 
tion carrying the show. KCBQ. an- 
nounced that the current sponsor was 
retiring from business. The next 
morning the station received seven of- 
fers of sponsorship. * * * 



Di'parttnent store finds tv stu 

"More popular than Santa Claus'' is 
the wav one official of Lit Bros., Phila- 
delphia department store, described the 
drawing power of actor Jon Hall 
i Ramar of the Jungle). The Television 
Programs of America film star at- 
tracted as main as 4,000 children a day 
between Thanksgiving and Christmas, 
store officials happily reported, adding 
that most of the youngsters wanted to 
see Ramar before Santa. A small ad- 



r pulls us well as Santa 

mission was charged by the store. » 

While there is no sponsor tie-up in 
Philadelphia between Ramar and Lit 
Bros. (show : is sponsored there by 
Good n' Plenty candy), the store spent 
$25,000 in constructing an appropriate 
jungle setting. In the picture Jon Hall 
I right ) points out the finer features 
of a lion to three moppets as two of 
Halls white hunters and an African 
chief look on. * * * 



Merchandising appearance of Jon Hall drew 4,000 children daily into Lit Bros., Philadelphia 




Tv stittions offered neiv 
weather foreeast service 

Irving P. Krick is doing plentv 
about the weather. 

I he Denver meteorologist, who in 
the past sold his nationwide weather 
forecasting mainly to private industry, 
now is offering the service to tv sta- 
tion-. Kenneth C. Raetz, who has the 
unusual title of "director of weather 
sales," said the service is unique in that 
it provides forecasts for the next seven 
da\s instead of the customary 24-hour 
forecast. Raetz says tv viewers thus 
can plan for outings and other occa- 
sion- a week in advance. In addition. 
Krick can provide forecasts a month in 
advance which turn out to be 70 r j ac- 
curate — considered good by meteorol- 
ogists. 

Krick's tv service, besides the fore- 
casts, includes a variety of features. It 
includes farm and garden advice based 
on the weather forecasts, weather con- 
tests in which viewers "compete" with 
Krick in predicting the weather, weath- 
er question and answer shows, graphs, 
charts and other material. * • * 



WBC's i*aek moderates 
'creative sivapshop" letter 

" \ creative swapshop" is how Rich- 
ard Pack, national program manager 
ol \\ estinghouse Broadcasting Co., de- 
scribes his new 7 monthlv newsletter. He 
sends the letter, called Program Cues, 
to all the Westinghouse stations. Pack 
also prints suggestions from program 
managers of the WBC stations. 

"All of us will come up with ideas 
that nun be fine for one town but won't 
survive import to another localitv." 
Pack reminded his program directors, 
"but we want all the ideas we can get 
anv wav ." 

As a follow-up to the first newsletter. 
Pack arranged a program seminar in 
New York which all WBC program di- 
rector- attended. Theme of the three- 
dav seminar was "programs are our 
product." One da\ w as taken up with 
an analysis and review of the five 50 
kw. WBC radio stations, their programs 
and opposition. * * * 



Kriefly . . . 

(.citing the listener into the acl helps 
build enthusiasm for radio, KRNT. 
Des Moines, believe-. The station's 
dailv afternoon Hill Rile) Time has 
listeners call in with questions thev 



8G 



SPONSOR 



have usuall) on cooking, the home, 
child care or other subjects of general 
interest. Riley announces the question 
over the air between records and lis- 
teners phone in answers. Same tech- 
nique is used by Bailey when he's 
interviewing personalities; listeners 
phone in questions they'd like Rile\ to 

ask the guest. 

» ■* # 

The Providence Advertising (Hub 
practices what its preaches. H. \\ illiam 
Coutlhurst. IWC president, said the 
club this month is beginning sponsor- 
ship of a weekly hour-long radio pro- 
gram on WHIM which will "sell" ad- 
vertising — to the public. The program, 
Theatre of Melody, will feature whole 
-rores from Broadway plays and Hol- 
1\ wood movies, plus some popular song 
hits. Coutlhurst said commercials on 
the program will explain advertising 
to listeners so they'll have a better un- 
derstanding of it. The club also will 
air public service messages during the 

show. 

» * # 

Shortly before 1954 expired. KOA, 
Denver, celebrated its 30th anniversary 
by holding a children's Christmas 
party for 4,000 sick, crippled and or- 
phaned youngsters. 

* » * 

At all its station breaks. WKNE, 
Keene, N. H., is airing the slogan: 

"People on the go, hear radio." 

• * » 

The outstanding Storer Broadcasting 
Co. station of 1954 is WBRC-TV, Bir- 
mingham. Annually Ceorge B. Storer, 
SBC president, selects one station to 
receive the award, which is based on 
over-all operation. In the picture. J. 




Robert Kerns I left j, v.p. & managing 
director of WBRC-TV, receives the 
award from Stanton P. Kettler, v.p. in 
charge of the southern district of SBC. 
WBRC-TV joined SBC in mid-1953; 
since then it's increased its power, be- 
come a CBS affiliate and moved into 
new offices and studios. 



For a real Sales KNOCKOUT 
in the Detroit area 



CKLW-TV penetrates 
a population grand 
total area of 5.295,700 
in which 85% of all 
families own TV sets. 




CKLW-TV 

channel 9 




■ 




That's the important thing. Ratings, ad- 
jacencies, programming, network, don't 
mean a thing if you can't increase SALES. 

CAN WJPS GET RESULTS? 

Here are just a few: 

Sterling Beer — Mid-Continent Petroleum 

— Coco-Cola — Purina Mills — Puffin 
Biscuits — Hesmer's Foods — Economy 
Super Markets — P. W. Burns Insurance 

— International Harvester — Red Bird 
Gasoline — International Salt — and 
many others that we will send upon re- 
quest. 

We would like to "Ring the Cash Regis- 
ter" for you because we have the KNOW 
HOW. 
Let us prove our worth to you. 

Robert J. Mcintosh, General Manager 

REPRESENTED IT 

The George P. Hollingbery Company 



No wonder she's 

SO POPULAR 



Who wouldn't be with 
Sioux City Sue-Land's proportions — 



effective coverage 
wholesale market 



retail 



sales 



33 counties, 
589,800 people 

34th in the U.S. 



2nd in Iowa 



Your Katz man can arrange a date. 





"A RADIO IN EVERY ROOM" 

Evansville, Indiana 



Sioux City, Iowa 
CBS. ABC & DuMONT 
A Cowles Station 



10 JANUARY 1955 



87 



NEVER WENT AWAY 

[Continued from page 49) 

meeting of the Broadcast Executives 

Club. Recentl) the station -| sored 

a program rating stud) in which the 
unnamed research firm reported these 
ratings lor the Arthur Godfrey radio 
-how: 5.7 <>n \\ ednesda) and 5.8 on 

Friday. This was fine with \\C\\ 
except Foi one thinu due to transmit- 
ter trouble tin- station had not been 
on the air on Fri<li\ . 

I et's look at another of the destruc- 
tive force- which failed to put radio 
away. 



Merchandising — it's a loose term at 
best so I'll simplify it by giving it a 
label "Project-Policeman- Whistle" — 
or "Emphasis on the Premium, not 

the I'm, In, i." 

The other day. in leafing through 
one of our trade publications, I ran 
across a double truck which carried 
the headline, "WXXX Goes to Mar- 
ket." Here incidentally, it is with the 
proper cen-or-hip exercised. May I 
quote from it: "WXXX Goes to Mar- 
ket — In super markets toda\ it takes 
something extra t" maintain fasl turn- 
over. That's \\h\ \\ \ \ \ ha- added a 




AMONG FRIENDS 

Windy knows he's welcome on Madison Avenue — because 
as lie puts it. "Experienced time-buyers Ion" ago discovered 
KTVH reaches more folks in Central Kansas per TV dollar." 

Profit by what other advertisers have learned and take 
WlNDl into your confidence, too! He'll prove the superior 
selling job KTVH can do for you. 

Start the Ball Rolling. Today! 



VHF 

240,000 
WATTS 



KTVH 

HUTCHINSON 



CBS BASIC-DUMONT 

Represented Nationally by H-R Representatives, Inc 



CHANNEL 



12 



KTVH, pioneei Station in rich Central Kin -a-, mi vc> more than I 1 important 
communities besides Wichita. Mam office and Minima m Hutchinson; office 
and Btudio in \\ ichita I Hotel Lassen I. Howard <>. Peterson, General Manager. 



new dimension to food-store market- 
ing— WXXX Super Marketing." And 
i ontinuing, "Once you qualify, WXXX 
Super marketing arranges for week- 
long displays of your product in these 
blank number of stores, stores which 
account for approximately 50' < of all 
grocer\ sales throughout the entire X 
area. Thus. \our product gets the 
mosl effective two-wa} advertising- 
plus-merchandising selling in the X 
area." 

Let me read from another merchan- 
dising plan. We'll call this "XXX Fea- 
ture Foods Plan," and here are the 
things which, once the advertiser qual- 
ifies, the advertiser gets: 200 merchan- 
dising and check sessions in 300 
stores; a 100 check calls in corporate 
chain stores; 100 one- week special dis- 
plays in super markets; 50 personally 
attended bargain store promotions; an 
ellort to induce stores to stock the ad- 
vertiser's product, plus decals, shelf ex- 
tenders, shelf talkers, display material, 
et cetera. 

These things I guess you can term 
merchandising — I have to guess be- 
cause I certainly am not an expert but 
I don't believe 1 have to be an expert 
hi order to term merchandising one of 
the destructive forces in radio today. 
May I give reasons — the first and most 
deadly is that most plans with which 
I have come in contact, psychological- 
ly as well as actually, place radio — our 
business — in a secondary position, or 
a qualifying position, if you will. Once 
you qualify (incidentally that qualify- 
ing is the purchase of your station) 
— once you qualify, the salesman tells 
the prospective client, "You get all of 
these wonderful things, dump displays, 
end displays, choice billboards, car 
cards, improved shelf locations, decals, 
etc." — Where the hell does radio come 
in? 

Then, il by chance the salesman en- 
counters -ales resistance you will find 
him extolling the merits of dump dis- 
plays, the prime locations of the bill- 
boards, the number of street car and 
bus i idei's. ilie circulation ol the papei 

carrying the ad in short, he's selling 
damn neat everything except his prod- 
uct, which is radio advertising. 

Merchandising then becomes a bat- 
tle of the giveaways, costing the sta- 
tion iimne\ which could and should be 
spenl in its primarj business — the pro- 
duction of good radio programs. 

I'll just quote part of an editorial 
reccnth published by C. B. Larrabee, 



88 



SPONSOR 



of Printers' Ink, two paragraphs of 
which are pertinent to this discussion: 
"The modern advertising medium 
offers many services. Just as in the 
case of the agency, some of these ser- 
vices are essential to modern media 
service. But. again, others can and 
should he performed hetter by the ad- 
vertiser. 

"It seems to me that too many 
advertisers are asking others to do 
jobs thev should do themselves. They 
must realize that they aren't getting 
these services free. Somehow, some- 
where they pay for them in the long 
run." 

I have just one more brief comment 
on merchandising and I think it's im- 
portant. With merchandising plans, 
many stations provide a certain classi- 
fication of clients — foods in the great 
majority of cases — services in addi- 
tion to broadcasting, which are with- 
held from other client classification-. 
M\ question is how this can be justi- 
fied to those client classifications which 
are not receiving these extras. Mv le- 
gal experience is nil but I wonder if 
the Clayton Act as amended by the 
Robinson-Patman Act smiles upon such 
inequities. Even if these plans are 
legal in the strict sense of the word, 
is it good sound business practice to 
give some clients services that are 
withheld from others? 

The third destructive force, for want 
of a better term, we're going to caption 
bad business practices. Under this 
general heading we can lump "selling 
off the rate card," — "talent conces- 
sions," — "special packages for special 
advertisers," — "charging for five min- 
utes at one-third of the 15-minute 
rate," — etc. 

Fellow Broadcasters, let's establish 
our price! Let's honestly evaluate our 
product, our facility, our circulation, 
our programs, our believability — let's 
then establish our rate cards and stick 
to those rates — let's make Standard 
Rate & Data a bible, not the first book 
of a continued mystery storv. 

While the three destructive forces — 
ratings, merchandising and bad busi- 
ness practices — haven't succeeded in 
burying radio, I believe I mentioned 
that on occasion the industrv has been 
stunned and here is the most recent 
blow. It s an article appearing in the 
August 23rd issue of Advertising Age, 
and it is titled "Radio. 1955 Style." I 
shan't read it all but I shall read 
enough to give the idea. It starts out 
as follows: "To look at a current rat- 



ing book and sadly reflect on the fallen 
grandeur of radio, is like viewing the 
Ruins of Pompeii." It ends up this 
w;i\: "There are a couple of simple 
rules to follow in usinj: radio. Call in 
the salesmen assigned to you from all 
four networks. Give them an exact 
idea of the budget. Wait a few days 
and stud) the multiple proposals built 
to vour specifications. Either take the 
best offer or work up a combination 
of several. Then negotiate. Remem- 
ber, in these days the first offer is an 
asking price." That, fellow Broadcast- 
ers, is what they're saying about us. 
Even though in this instance they refer 
to the networks, the unmistakable con- 
clusion that anyone reading the arti- 
cle would gain is that radio is selling 
its merchandise for what it can get. 
I nt i 1 such time as all segments of our 
industrv firm up their rates we can ex- 
pect to feel the taint of bargain base- 
mentism. 

You know, the tragic thing about 
these three forces harming radio is 
that they are self-administered. Yes, 
we, the radio industry, have done it 
to ourselves and I say again that in 
many instances only the vitality of the 
medium itself has enabled it to go for- 
ward. Isn't it appalling that a medium 
that reaches 97 to 98% of all the fam- 
ilies of the United States has in some 
cases raised the white flag? Only re- 
cently a most prominent executive in 
the electronic communications field, 
spoke most discouragingly of radio 
and its future. Apparently those 117 
million radio sets, most of which he 
manufactured, are being used as door- 
stops. 

So much for destructive forces — so 
often it is the practice to criticize, to 
second guess, without offering any an- 
tidote for the maladies which have on 
occasion stunned us and which have 
assuredly retarded our progress. What 
are the antidotes? What are the stim- 
uli b\ which our industry not only 
survives but occupies its rightful place 
among media? Our rightful plate in 
our opinion, is first for the most sim- 
ple basic reason — that it will reach 
more people more times with convinc- 
ing effect for less money than any 
other medium. 

Now, to those antidotes. You know. 
when a fine football team occasionally 
starts falling apart, the coach usually 
calls a special practice session for the 
purpose of brushing up on fundamen- 
tals, and that, incidentally, usually does 
the trick. Mav be some of our mo-t 



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CESAR ROMERO, starring in . . . 




ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y. 

CHICAGO • ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD • DALLAS 



10 JANUARY 1955 



89 



powerful antidote- are the fundamen- 
tals of "in business. I offei as antidote 
No. 1 a t j 11 * > t * - from the rules and regu- 
lations ol the Federal Communical 
Commission : 

Section 3.2 ! (h) I hat the public in- 
terest, onvei ! d i essil . will 

be served through the proposed opera- 
tion. 

I wonder if we, as broa 
have looked at tliis licensing i 
ment correctly. !< it a requirement we 
musl reluctantl) live with or is it trul) 
a "formula for success"? 1 believe it's 
the latter and whether or not the pro- 
pounders of this regulation realize it. 
the) gave us a real blueprint which, 
when followed, cannot fail to bring 

-II. i 5S 

John Patt, whom you all know as 
presidenl of our company, defines this 
function in these words: "We look 
upon our station as a giant mirror re- 
flecting constantl) the needs and de- 
- of those residing in oui sen ice 
.ma." We helieve that public service 
comes first and that doing a good job 
of public service is one of the best 
guarantees of business to follow, "'i ou 



shall broadcast in public interest, con- 
venience and necessity" What hetter 
formula to ma' e your station impor- 
tant to your community, and inci- 
dentally, I know of nothing keeping 
public service broadcasts from being 
sp< msored. 

The second antidote, or fundamen- 
tal if you will, i- youi facility itself. 
Gi\ in,- j our -tall the best "I to hnical 

tools with which to work; keeping 
abreast of the latest technical develop- 
ments which we have to improve qual- 
it\ and production; the provision of 
mobile, short wave and minitape facili- 
ties to take advantage of radio"- nat- 
ural advantage -peed. \ll of these 

mdai lal to pi ogre>s. 

The third antidote, or fundamental. 
i- your programs and when you speak 
of programs you must in the same 
reath speak of talent. In our opinion. 
there i- no dearth of good live talent 
hut there has been a tremendous laxitv 
on the part of broadcasters to search 
out that talent. How many broadcast- 
el- today are conducting regular audi- 
tion- in their respective areas? How 
main broadcasters are taking the ea-\ 



way and programing disk jocke) 
against disk jockey, both using the top 
10 records a< their basic program 
format? 

There should be no need for the 
third rerun oi the Beulah series, or the 
second rerun of Skelton, and Hope, 
and Jack Benny. We radio stations 
should be a continuing source of fresb 
talent the talent is there, it i- our job 
to find them and train them and send 
them olT to bigger things. Incidentally, 
the reruns of shows that have run 
their gamut are cheaper. \s broad- 
casters we know that, hut 1 must \ ouch- 
safe that the cheapness of these pro- 
grams is not a well kept secret -the 
public finds it out \ er\ fast. 

The fourth fundamental, and these 
fundamentals are not. please, in order 
of their importance. Our industry 
needs, individuallv and collectively, 
good sound business practices. We're 
proud, and I know main of you are. to 
be able to make the statement that our 
contract file is wide open for anyone 
to peruse who wishes to. We maintain 
our rate cards, we treat all clients 
alike. Granted, we like some clients 



Who Buys Your Product in Omaha? 



:hild 



(women 



(or the entire family) 



■\ 



WOW-TV Has The Top Rated Show For 

Here's Proof: 

ARB October Survey of ALL Daytime Programs! 
(Monday thru Friday) 
Top Rated CHILDREN'S SHOWS: 

WOW TV's children's programs placed First . . . 
Second . . . and Third. Other station placed Sixth. 

First TRAIL TIME 43.2 

Second STAND BY FOR ACTION. .. .38.4 

Third SNICKER FLICKERS 40.8 

Sixth Other Station 18.4 

Top Rated WOMEN'S SHOWS: 

WOW TV's women's shows ranked Fourth and Sev- 
enth . . . Other station's women's shows placed 
Eleventh and Twelfth. 

Fourth MOVIE MATINEE 22.2 

Seventh CONNIE'S KITCHEN 17.3 

Eleventh Other Station 12.4 

Twelfth Other Station 11.4 



To&IIYtoir Product 



pick an adjac 
program above that 
TKlinVl/»-i4#\ Fred Ebener, Sales Manager, \\ 
infSnfVrilli tor availabilities and complete inform 





Max. Power • NBC-TV • DuMonf • Aff. 

A Meredith Station - Blair TV Rep. 

Affiliated with "Better Homes and Gardens" 
and "Successful Farming Magazines. 



90 



SPONSOR 



better than others but on our station 
there is only one deal and you'll find it 
in Standard Rate and Data. Good busi- 
ness practice, in our book, begets good 
business. 

The fifth and final fundamental is 
organization morale. It is no secret 
that many of us who have found our 
companies engaged in another medium 
as well as radio, have, because of the 
complexities of that medium, sorely 
neglected our radio station. 

We're not the only ones who have 
noticed that neglect. It is quite possi- 
ble for our radio staffs to feel that they 
are, in effect, stepchildren. If our sta- 
tions are to be the vital organization 
that we all want them to be, we're go- 
ing to have to organize in such a man- 
ner as to give these stations exclusive 
management personnel who are avail- 
able on a day-to-day basis to handle 
the personnel and business problems 
that arise from day to day. 

Destructive forces — progressive 
forces; fumbles and recoveries; mis- 
takes and corrections — they are all part 
of the growth pattern of a magnificent, 
vital and powerful industry — RADIO 
— the medium that never went away! 



SUNBEAM 

[Continued from page 45) 

tinue to rely on the already established 
consumer pattern. This means a con- 
tinuation of a policy of concentrating 
major ad money during the last part 
of the year. Sunbeam, in short, is con- 
cerned with the question of how to util- 
ize the tv medium in the most flexible 
manner to allow this kind of promo- 
tion. 

Along with the other spectacular 
sponsors, Sunbeam has, for this rea- 
son, cancelled out of the summer 
schedule — the seasonal viewer decline 
is also a factor. The company is com- 
mitted to NBC up to May of this year. 
However, according to the agency, 
there is every expectation of continued 
heavy spending on NBC next fall, with 
NBC President Pat Weaver expected 
to help fashion "timed programing" 
that will carry on in the tradition of 
the spectaculars. 

Except for continued participation 
in The Home Show, plans for next 
year's tv campaign are still not final- 
ly decided. Despite trade rumors. Sun- 
beam will not go in for co-sponsor- 
ship of The Martha Raye Show with 
its spectacular running mate Hazel 



Bishop. NBC had approached Ha- 
zel Bishop for this single shol owing 
to the ironic fact that the network had 
sold the 5 December spectacular to 
Reynolds Metals, which left Sunbeam 
without a pre-Christmas slot. I he 
Martha Raye sponsorship filled this 
hole, and with great success. 

Nor is the Ethel & Albert question 
completely cleared up as SPONsou -,n- 
to press. Originally this family-type 
show seemed ideal for Sunbeam. 
Somewhat off the beaten track, it was 
adult and done with a pleasing taste 
and skill that seemed appropriate com- 
pany for a quality product, even 
though the top ratings were not ex- 
pected from the fairly low-budget 
show r . Nor was Sunbeam pleased with 
the time slot, 7-7:30 p.m. EST. Still, 
il went along in the hope that the show 
would build enough of a rating to 
justify a more desirable period. Cur- 
rent Nielsen figures, however, reveal 
that it has not been able to deliver the 
ratings hoped for. Not only does the 
show run into the problem of its time 
slot — out of the Eastern time belt it 
reaches the viewer at the less desirable 
Saturday late afternoon period — but it 
also has to face the serious competi- 
tion of Beat the Clock on CBS. 

It is with great reluctance that 
Sunbeam discarded the show as of 
the first of the year. But the need for 
maximum coverage makes this un- 
avoidable, according to Widdifield. 
This despite the evidence from its own 
spot surveys that among Sunbeam 
users the popularity of the program is 
greater than ratings seem to indicate. 
One survey showed that nearly 50% 
of those who had Sunbeam products 
knew and liked Ethel & Albert. 

But Sunbeam decided to be guided 
by the figures supplied in the Niel- 
sen reports. 

There has been talk that NBC is 
trying to work out a new time slot 
and an alternate sponsorship arrange- 
ment. At the present time, however, 
Sunbeam's 1955 plans do not include 
Ethel & Albert. Furthermore, Widdi- 
field told sponsor, decisions on shows 
of this level must await more precise 
formulation of plans for the major t\ 
efforts. The company is now actively 
engaged in examining various tv pro- 
posals for next year. 

In any case, there is little question 
that Sunbeam will be on tv with a 
family-appeal show of one sort or 
another. Nor is there much doubt 
that it will be in there pitching via 



WE'VE BEEN 
SIGNING UP 
A SPONSOR 
A DAY... AND 
THEY'RE 
STILL 
COMING! 

When PASSPORT TO DANGER hit the 
market, it was snapped up in 30 cities 
within 28 days . . . by such big-time 
advertisers as Blatz Beer and Welch Grape 
Juice. What's more, it's the first syndi- 
cated series ever sold on the full CBC 
network. This show must really have 
something . . . and it does! No other show 
you can buy boasts the box-office magic 
of a star like Romero. He'll do your 
commercials, too ... all at a price that 
fits easily into a modest budget. Orders 
keep coming in to the offices below. . . 
what about yours? 

CESAR ROMERO, starring in . . . 




ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y. 

CHICAGO • ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD • DALLAS 



10 JANUARY 1955 



91 



-;«•< 1. 1. u!. ii - ..i their equivalent come 
fall. Sunbeam is here to sta) so far 
as rv i- concerned. 

For Sunbeam, in fact, i\ bi 
die ideal medium, because it allows 
for straight, clean-cut demonstration 
which i- in keeping with the emphasis 
on quality. Hard-hitting, shouting 
cop) i- considered inappropriate b\ 
the company, nor can it offer the at- 
traction of price or the spei ial deal. 

I lie "qualirj factor is utilized 1>\ 
Sunbeam to paj of! in association val- 
ues. I he lii in lrlii'\ es that nearl) 
everyone knows at least one of its 



products, feels therefore that each ben- 
< lit- 1 1» mi i association with the others. 
I in this reason e\er\ -how contains 
one commercial at the end of the pro- 
gram, which is little more than a run- 
down of the various Sunbeam applia- 
ances. I p front there is usually a 
short commercial on a product, while 
the middle commercial is a two-min- 
ute demonstration devoted to the main 
appliance for the show. 

Sunbeam has had many commenda- 
tions l"i it- color commercials on the 
spectaculars, even to favorable press 
rexiews that considered them superior 




Gracious, indeed, arc New Orleans koines 
— hut gracious! Where are the occupants? 

Thanks to it- Deep South climate, New Orleans is an 
outdoor <it\. That's important to remember when ad- 
vertising to the South's biggest market. And this makes 
it a verj important fad thai WDSl has more out-of- 
the-house listenership than any other New Orleans 
station. 

Success in reaching its audience with programs of greal 
consumer acceptance means thai sponsors, too, have en- 
joyed greal success in reaching WDSl "- receptive audi- 
ence with resultful sales messages. Won't you ask us 
aboul availabilities? 

W DSTJ K \IM<> NeM Orleans— Vital To The South'a Biggest Market 



to the shows. This has its element of 
irony .since the company stresses that 
black-and-white sets are still the in- 
struments in common use and that 
more is being made of color at the 
moment than coverage warrants. 

If they have nothing else. Sunbeam 
feels, the color commercials have pro- 
vided the excitement needed in dealer 
merchandising. And to Sunbeam how 
I he dealer feel- is as important as any 
lacet ol its ad program. In a sense, 
the dealer is the foundation of the en- 
tire Sunbeam system of marketing. 
The company's widespread distribu- 
tion is based on some 200.000 dealers 
who can be found in the smallest of 
towns. In the long run. Sunbeam is 
convinced that it is how these little 
dealers in the byways of America feel 
that will determine its sales. 

Sunbeam's promotional efforts are 
likened 1>\ \\ iddifield to an elecrtic 
line which runs overhead across the 
entire country. It is there to provide 
sales "power" to the dealer in every 
hamlet. But unless he reaches up to 
that line that passes just outside and 
overhead and "plugs into it."' it is 
doing no good. The dealer can "plug 
in through his own promotion, ad- 
vertising and store display. 

Sunbeam likes to regard itself as 
somehow but an extension of this lit- 
tle dealer, and is proud of its home- 
spun, simple and conser\ ati\ e charac- 
ter. But it has been doing remarkabl) 
well since its birth in 1893 a- the Flex- 
ible Shaft Co. of Chicago. In 1910 
Sunbeam entered the consumer field 
with an earlv electric iron and has 
been growing steadih since. \mong 
the concern's other operations is the 
largest lawn sprinkler manufacturer in 
the country — the Rainking. It pro- 
duces other garden equipment, basing 
just introduced a power mower. And 
from its inception. Sunbeam has been 
a | lucei ol industrial furnaces. 

\n interesting sideline i- the hard- 
ware division, which manufactures 
'Mr, o| the country's sheep-shearing 
and cow-clipping equipment. 

But the major division turns out the 
-niall home appliances. \nd ill this 
field the Midwestern outfit has done 
right well. Just prior to Christmas 
the facloix was going three -hilts, and 
the l'dl sale- figures will undoubted- 

Lj exceed the $80,000,000 racked up 
the year before. Presumably, Sun- 
beam will continue to rel\ on its con- 
senative approach to produce even 
better results in tin- future. * * * 



92 



SPONSOR 



COMMERICAL AUDIENCE 

(Continued from page 47) 

RAB (formerly BAB) have all looked 
into the matter. 

With tv's first big boom in the early 
1950's, advertisers began to seek the 
answer to tv commercial viewing. Two 
firms Daniel Starch & Staff and 
Gallup-Robinson — have been their 
chief sources of data. 

Starch entered the field around 1951, 
utilizing a variation of the readership 
studies it has conducted in conjunction 
with print media since the 1930's. 
Gallup-Robinson began researching 
print media in the I940's and tv 
around 1952. 

In both cases, the techniques are 
somewhat similar. Starch surveys by 
telephone in a half-dozen large cities, 
asking viewers within an hour of the 
telecast to describe the sales points of 
commercials ( with occasional spoken 
prompting by interviewers). Usually, 
somewhere between 150 and 200 inter- 
views are completed. Calls are made 
on a random basis. 

The Gallup-Robinson technique goes 
into more detail, although it is basic- 
ally checking the same thing — viewers' 
ability to "recall" a commercial. Inter- 
views are conducted about 24 hours 
after telecast in 10 cities, as far west as 
Chicago. The normal sample is about 
200 men and 200 women viewers. The 
samples, according to G-R executives, 
are not "probability" (completely- 
representative) samples. (Average G-R 
"recall" figure, incidentally, is esti- 
mated by the firm to be "around 
50%.") 

In large measure, it was the wide- 
spread use in the tv industry of "recall" 
measurements that triggered NBC TV 
into making its own checkup. 

The trouble as NBC TV executives 
saw it was that admen too easily con- 
fused the findings between Starch's 
print media checkups ("recognition" 
tests in which readers are actually 
shown the complete magazine) and 
tv research I "recall" tests in which 
there was no visual prompting). 

A little more than a year ago, 
Starch's tv director — Jack Boyle — 
unwittingly added to the problem by 
mentioning in a speech before admen 
that "41 ft of the viewers of the 
average nighttime network tv show see 
any given commercial within that pro- 
gram. Boyle made a quick comparison 
between this figure, based on "recall" 



studi 



ies, and magazine noting 



averages of 40% for color page ads. 
The controvers\ was quick in coining, 
i Sec "\\ ill Starch's new tv noting 
figures upset buying strategy?", and 
"Beware of these misuses of Starch tv 
figures," \(> November and 30 
November, 1953 issues of sponsor.) 

Few were more outspoken in their 
criticism of these figures than Hugh 
\I. Beville, Jr.. NBC's Director of 
Research and Planning. Said Beville 
to sponsor at that time: 

"Starch magazine ratings employ the 
recognition technique. Every effort is 
made to re-create the circumstances 
under which the respondent looked at 
the magazine originally. For the tv 
studies, the respondent is not shown 
the program in which the commercial 
appeared, or the commercial itself. 

"The onlv conclusion we reach is 
that the two techniques are not at all 
identical and are similar only in that 
they are both produced by Starch." 

That, perhaps, should have been 
that. 

But the comparisons continued to be 
made, NBC TV noted — particularly by 
print media representatives, such as 
those of Curtis Publications, LOOK 
and the ANPA. And, admen continued 
to look upon "recall" figures — in which 
viewers "play back" the sales points 
of commercials" — as a good index of 
the percentage of viewers actually 
watching those tv commercials. 

Accordingly, NBC in early 1954 be- 
gan preparations for a study designed 
to measure the proportion of viewers 
who see and remember the commer- 
cials of a "typical" network tv show. 
Both "recall" and "recognition" tech- 
niques were to be used. 

Thus, NBC TV felt, it would knock 
off two birds with one research stone. 

How the study tvag done: Hugh 
Beville and Allen Cooper, NBC TV 
manager of Markets & Media, were in 
charge of designing, executing and 
interpreting the study. 

From the start, NBC TV decided 
that the study was going to be in two 
phases: 

Part one : The study called for a new 
approach — a viewer "recognition" 
study of tv commercials, comparable 
to the technique used by Starch in 
checking magazine readership. With 
a target of 250 interviews (at a cost of 
some $20 apiece) , Starch researchers 
were assigned the job of house-to-house 
interviews. The method: portions of 



THE PEOPLE 
YOU'RE 



ON THIS 
SALESMAN 

Cesar Romero, star of the new TV hit, 
passport to danger, is definitely a 
"hot" property. Every moviegoer knows 
him, and he is starring in three new 
pictures about to be released, so you can 
see he needs no build-up to your cus- 
tomers. No wonder local and regional 
sponsors have snapped up this show! 
With Romero, you know you'll get an 
audience. Plus attention for your selling 
message . . . because he'll also do your 
commercials and go all-out for your 
product. The orders keep coming in, and 
someone else may gobble up your 
market. Contact us today, at one of the 
offices listed below. 

CESAR ROMERO, starring in... 




TO 
DANGER 




ABC FILM 

SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N Y 

CHICAGO • ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD • DALLAS 



10 JANUARY 1955 



93 



a tv program were to be screened for 
people who said the) had seen the 
program. These portions were to 
include the commercials just as Starch 
print media checks are made on the 
basis of actual printed ads. Then, a 
depth interview was to be conducted 
to probe for the reasons why viewers 
ma) have missed an) of the commer- 
cials. 

Part tiro: The stud) would include 
a larger-than-ordinar) Starch "recall 
sur\c\. The usual sample, according 
to NBC TV, is "approximatel) L50 
interviews.'" To allow for broader 



analysis and greater statistical reliabil- 
ity this goal was stepped up to 350 
interviews in the pilot study. The 
usual procedure was to be followed; 
Starch interviewers would ask viewers 
In phone to recall the sales points of 
commercials. 

Finally. NBC TVs original plans 
• ailed for a comparison of the two 
sets of findings. 



Vthtu show to tvst?: 

right show for the video 



Picking the 
pilot" studs 

wasn't eas\ . Recalled NBC TV research 

man Mien ( iooper: 




The Hangin' of Soddy Joe 

On the moonless night of October 3rd, 1878, a character 
known only as Soddy Joe stole a horse from a Kansas farmer. 

Four hours later, a posse caught Joe just west of Great Bend 

and hung him from this tree. 

That's swift action! 

And if you want SWIFT SALES ACTION for your product, 

turn the job over to WIBW — the radio station Kansas farmers 

listen to most. We've been hanging up sales records for 

the past 30 years. 

•Kansas Radio Audience 1954. 



Ben Ludy, Ccn. Mgr. 

WIBW & WIBW-TV in Topeka 
KCKN in Kansas City 

Rep: Capper Publication, Inc. 




TOPEKA, 
KANSAS 



'"Because of the nature of the studv. 
any show we picked had to measure up 
to a special sort of yardstick. 

*'\\ e needed a show that was on film. 
That's because we wanted to send out 
an edited-down print of the program 
to field interviewers prior to the 
telecast, so that they could get started 
on the research without any major 
dela\ -. 

"We wanted a show that ran early 
in the evening, so that a Starch 
Immediate Recall Survey could be 
made in conjuction with it, since we 
wanted ultimately to compare 'recall' 
and 'recognition' of commercials. If 
the show was aired too late, we wouldn't 
have enough time left to make telephone 
calls. 

"We needed a show with a fairly 
high rating and wide appeal. This 
would make it easier for interviewers to 
locate program viewers during the 
checkup. If a rating is low, you have 
to hunt harder for viewers. 

After combing the roster of NBC 
TV shows, researchers came up with 
the answer: DeSoto's You Bet 1 our 
Life, starring Groucho Marx. 

That the show filled the bill on all 
counts can be judged from the fact 
that it usually pulls Nielsen ratings 
in the high 40's, is on film and appears 
early on Thursday night. 

The show also filled the bill on 
another score, too. The commercials 
were fairlv "average" in terms of pro- 
duction frills. They were not, by any 
means, lavish film jobs that would 
make a higher-than-ordinary impact 
on the subconscious of the average 
viewer of the show. 

Having its video guinea pig, NBC 




Him KRIZ Phoenix personality — adopted 
by tribe." 



94 



SPONSOR 



TV's research project went into high 
gear. 

The field work: Here's how the 
study was made in the field : 

Recall: The standard Starch pro- 
cedure of random calls to viewers was 
used. As soon as the winter-season 
telecast of the Groucho show was off 
the air. Starch telephone quizzers in 
six cities conducted interviews with 
156 men and 201 women who claimed 
to have viewed the show. 

These cities included Baltimore, 
Cleveland, Columbus, Detroit, Phila- 
delphia and St. Paul. The sample — 
more than twice the size of the usual 
Starch checkup — was big enough, 
NBC TV felt, to give them some degree 
of reliability. 

In the "recall" portion, a total of 
954 calls were completed. Of those 
responding, a little more than 93 c /o 
owned tv sets. Of the tv owners, 43.2% 
claimed to have viewed all or part of 
the program. 

Recognition: Next morning. Starch 

interviewers started the house-to-house 

check of "recognition" of commercials, 

using portable movie projection equip- 

I ment. 

Three Starch interviewers were used 



in each of the si\ major markets 
mentioned above. A total of L,385 
persons were approached in order to 
complete 232 interview- II.'! with 
men and 114 with women. More than 
93% of the sample owned h sets; 
46.7% said they'd seen the Groucho 
show being checked. 

NBC TV and Starch tried to keep 
both samples "as uniform a- possible," 
and reasonably representative of all 
classes of tv viewers. Pre-selected 
neighborhoods (upper, middle and 
lower class) were used, mapped in 
connection with real estate firms in the 
cities surveyed. Phone calls were made, 
with the use of city directories, to the 
same areas where the "recognition" 
checks were made. 

(Incidental point: Starch inter- 
viewers found the "recognition" portion 
tough sledding in many cases. Respon- 
dents often felt that the movie pro- 
jector was part of some sort of sales 
device and refused to allow an inter- 
view. Telephone checkups, by contrast, 
were easy.) 

For the personal interviews in 
viewers' homes, Starch field crews set 
up the portable projectors and screens 
and ran off an edited-down print. 
Length: about seven minutes. It 



tained the main program title, and 

the first and second program ■ 
menial.-. Both commercials were 
preceded and followed by a chunk of 
the program, to put the commercial in 
some sort <>i context. 

The first commercial featured new 
cars. The second stressed used cars. 

Following each commercial segment 
(and surrounding material), the pro- 
jector was stopped. Interviewer- asked: 
"Do you remember seeing this com- 
mercial, or any part of it" The answers 
were noted verbatim. Interviewers also- 
asked if the viewer had seen the whole 
show, or only part, and also asked 
questions to find out win viewers 
missed commercials or portions of the 
program. 

U Inn the study shoieed: Part of 
the highlights of the study have already 
been discussed. Others are detailed in 
this report in the charts on pages 46-47. 
The remainder of the findings actually 
fill a 20-page report from NBC TV's 
research department (available upon 
request from NBC TV's Hugh M. 
Beville, Jr., Director of Research & 
Planning, NBC. New York. 

Here are other general highlights of 
interest to tv admen: 



DO THEY WATCH WWTV? 




OVER 5000 CHILDREN FIGHT 
FOR 2700 SEATS TO SEE «n person, 

RANGE RIDER ,„, DICK WEST 

TWO OF THEIR WWTV FAVORITES! 

"The promotion of the Range Rider and Dick West for 
our client, Michigan Bakeries, Inc., was 'terrific' The 
number of children and parents who came to see these 
two personalities were beyond our most optimistic ex- 
pectations. I would like to say though that the marvelous 
cooperation which you and your staff extended to us in 
making this promotion the success it was, was also 
beyond our expectations. I have been in radio and TV 
for quite a few years and have never received more 
enthusiastic support than that which 
WWTV gave me. Again many thanks 
for a job well done. Cordially," webbe'r aov agency 

"I have had some very glowing reports of the wonderful cooperation you and your 
organization gave us in connection with the personal appearance of the Range Rider. 
May I take this occasion to thank you for 
the fine job you did. Cordially yours,' ' - . president Michigan bakeries 



FROM CADILLAC, MICH. 

CBS- ABC- DUMONT 
10 JANUARY 1955 



WWTV 



VHF CHANNEL 13 

REPRESENTED BY 

WEED TELEVISION 

95 



Recall: According to NBC TV, the 
results of the phone checkups unaided 
or vocally-aided recall — were fairly 
typical of the general run of Starch 
checkups on similar shows. The find- 
ings: The average Identification Rating 
for each of the two commercials m 
the show was around 60%- -a familial 
"'recall" figure, since it approximates 
the average of nighttime network shows 
today, Starch says. Other details: 
76.2^ of the viewers could recall at 
least one ol the commercials; 43.6% 
recalled both. 

Recognition: \s mentioned earlier. 



"1.1, of the respondents who said 
the) had seen the program recognized 
at least one commercial; 67.2% recog- 
nized both. Average recognition for 
each commercial: about 80%. 

Since the studv was designed 
to be similar to the Starch magazine 
readership checkups, the comparison 
between print and tv figures is reveal- 
ing. According to Starch executive Jack 
Boyle (who has made the statement 
on several occasions), the average 
"noting" figure I those who recognize 
a print ad even if they can't identify 
the advertiser ) for color page ads in 




"KXLY-TV 'CO-OP' BUILDS 
100^,30^,23% SALES GAINS 
FOR CARNATION PRODUCTS!" 

Excerpts from letter 

"On October 21st, we started the Tele- 
market Special on Canned Friskies. Our 
sales for a three-week period almost 
doubled any other similar period in 1954. 
On October 28th we started the Tele- 
market on Special Morning Milk. Dur- 
ing a three-week period, Special 
Morning Milk sales showed an increase 
of some 30%. 

The Telemarket Special on Albers 
Flapjack Mix started November 11th. 
To date we show about a 23% increase 
in sales for the period of November 
4th to 19th." 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) 

PHIL G. WITHERS 

District Sales Manager 

Available at a discount when 
purchased in conjunction with 
other XL stations. 




SPOHRHE 



RICHRRR E. J0I1ES 

uice pre s. 8. gen. mgr. 



uinsHincTon 



Rep.-RUERV-HROREl 

moore & Lund : Seattle, port land 



magazines is "around 40%." 

Can the two be compared directlv ? 
1 here are many psychological and 
research factors which make the inter- 
media comparison a tricky one (infla- 
lion td respon-e-. variances of samples, 
confusion with earlier commercials or 
ads, technique of interview . etc.). 

Ito viewers duvk commercials?: 

The depth interviews conducted as part 
of the "recognition" checkup gave 
some important clues as to the extent 
to which people are not reached by 
tv commercials. 

Viewers who said the\ saw the pro- 
gram material that went before and 
after the commercials, but who couldn't 
recognize the commercials themselves, 
were asked "what were you doing 
during the commercial-? 

The total group of "missed" com- 
mercials — a little less than 20 r 'c of 
the maximum potential number of 
commercials that could have been 
delivered if all the respondents had 
seen all the commercials — was analyzed. 

This was what NBC TV found : 

1. About 28 c /c of the missed adver- 
tising chances were caused bv a viewer 
being present at his turned-on set, but 
not paying attention to the commercial. 

2. About 7% of the "misses"' were 
due to a viewer being at his set, but 
being distracted b\ someone else or 
presumably forgetting what the partic- 
ular commercial was all about. 

3. About 27 r c of the "misses" were 
caused when a viewer left the set to 
avoid the commercial or to take 
advantage of the "break in the show. 

4. About 35% of the missed com- 
mercials could be traced to the fad that 
viewers had been awa\ from the set 
because the) either started viewing the 
program alter the commercial was 
presented, or stopped viewing before. 

Points out NBC T\ : "Part of the 
'misses' are due to 'turnover.' 1 he 
"avoided' advertising messages onlj 
accounted for in.;*,', of the maximum 
potential. Only six respondents in the 
sample i _.<>', "I total) avoided both 
commercials in the show." In other 
word-, tv commercials drive vcrv few 
viewer- awav limn their sets. * * * 



RADIO & TV PERSONNEL 

We screen New York's vast 
source of qualified personnel; 
take the guesswork out of hir- 
ing for stations anywhere. Tell 
us your needs, we do the restl 

CAREER BUILDERS Agency 

Marjorie Witty, Director, Radio-TV DiV. 
35 West 53rd St., New York 19 • PL 7 6385 
* • ■ A 




96 



SPONSOR 



CEMENT DUS-TOP 

(Continued from page 50) 

an average of 14 to 26 phone-inquiries 
a day. 

This sparked the second, and hoped- 
for result: Retail outlets began to in- 
crease. Retailers who had not handled 
Dus-Top before suddenly found con- 
sumers — in surprising numbers — ask- 
ing for the product, and hastily 
stocked up. 

Within three months, the Cement 
Dus-Top distribution picture in metro- 
politan Detroit had changed from 37 
dealers to 172 — an increase of nearly 
400%. Not only did retailers stock 
the product. They gave it generous 
counter and window-display space, 
using attention-getting display cards 
supplied by McMillan. 

The success of the Detroit radio 
radio campaign paved the way for 
establishing retail markets in Ohio, 
Illinois and Indiana during the follow- 
ing months. 

The D. A. Marks agency worked 
with the company in planning the ra- 
dio campaign. Pete Allen is account 
executive for McMillan. 

McMillan is still continuing the Dus- 
Top commercials on the Tom George 
Show, currently running them at about 
3:00 p.m. each day. The firm is more 
interested in reaching women than 
men, since it is the housewife who 
must keep the house clean and to 
whom the tracking up of cement dust 
from the basement might be a problem. 

Here is a sample of one typical 
commercial: 

"Mrs. Homemaker . . . how would 
\ou like to keep a cleaner house . . . 
with less work? Of course you would, 
and here's how: Dus-Top your base- 
ment cement floor! You see, much of 
the dust and dirt that accumulates 
upstairs actually comes from the base- 
ment floor! Hard to believe? Just 
think a moment . . . did you ever 
scrape your shoe across a cement 
floor? Remember how the dust came 
up, or was left there to be tracked up 
into your kitchen, dining room or 
living room? Well, Cement Dus-Top 
eliminates all that . . . permanently 
seals and hardens the cement and dust- 
proofs your cement floor forever! 
Cement Dus-Top is easy to apply, too. 
You just spread it on with a mop, 
squegee or hair-broom. . . . Cement 
Dus-Top is also ideal to apply before 
painting or tiling your basement floor. 
It creates a hard, more adhesive sur- 



face . . . keeps tiles from popping up 
in a month or two. So, get Cement 
Dus-Top!" 

The radio campaign has been sup- 
ported |i\ continuing direct mail and 
personal calls on dealers. According 
to Russ Simpson: "The combination 
of these things helped put us across 
in Detroit. We also use throw-awns >. 
point-of-sale pieces, display cards and 
anything else we can get into the deal- 
er's hands to help move the product." 

Cement Dus-Top retails al $4.39 for 
a one-gallon container. It is distributed 
by hardware and paint stores and lum- 
ber yards. Since the radio push 
launching Cement Dus-Top on the De- 
troit market, no less than three new 
similar products have appeared, ac- 
cording to sales manager Simpson. 

Cement Dus-Top was previously 
used by industry to harden and dust- 
proof concrete floors under the name 
Demicon Cure-Hard. The McMillan 
Floor Company, Midwest industrial 
floor contractor working largely- with 
concrete, came upon this material 
about five years ago, used it with 
great satisfaction on various jobs. Mc- 
Millan liked it, became distributors 
for the product in the Midwest and 
formed the McMillan Products Co. 
(Hazel Park, Mich.) to manufacture 
and distribute Demicon Cure-Hard 
and Demicon Liquid Floor Hardener. 

Later, the idea occurred to key men 
at McMillan that there was nothing on 
the market that solved the age-old 
problem of cement dust tracked from 
basements, garages, carports and the 
like. So they took Demicon, put it into 
gallon cans, changed the name to a 
more easily marketable one and start- 
ed to promote Cement Dus-Top for 
the home consumer. * * * 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 77) 

quite. I suspect that favorable reviews 
can help those programs which are 
broadcast outside of the high traffic 
hours — they call attention to shows 
which might not be sampled ordinarily. 
I suspect too that favorable reviews 
might encourage those who have dared 
to experiment and are in need of 
encouragement. 

But are unfavorable notices cause 
for a client's concern? I think not. 
In broadcasting, the public's opinion 
prevails, regardless of the pronounee- 
ments of the critics. * * * 



FORD RADIO JINGLE 
Continued from page 1 1 l 

head of the popular record division of 
that outfit, he is naturally interested 
in seeing us make a deal with his top 
recording star. He is certain that such 
an arrangement means a big lift for 
the song parodied. 

At the same time, Bob Ballin will 
take up the question with Kenyon & 
Eckhardt. 

Joe Stone (Ford 
group copy head) 



June 22, 1954 
Jack Reeser, Detroit 
Dear Jack: 

Sorry that so far I have nothing 
definite to report. We cannot do any- 
thing on Rosemary Clooney until the 
question of her status vis-a-vis Toast 
of the Town is clarified. In the mean- 
time, we are starting work on origiinal 
tunes for her accompanying spots and 
others. I think we may be close to a 
selection for a parody, incidentally. 
We are now listening to Rosemary's 
recent recordings, trying to determine 
which will lend itself to commercial 
treatment as well as hold out promise 
of becoming a hit. I am confident we 
shall be able to report progress soon. 
Joe Stone 




10 JANUARY 1955 



97 



July 15, 1954 
Joe Stone. New York 
Dear Joe: 

Jack Reeser has left on a field trip. 
He will go on vacation immediately 
after. He inquired about the Clooney 
commercial. Has her status with re- 
gard to Ed Sullivan's show been set- 
tled? Would like to have some news 
for Jack when he gets back. 

W. Eldon Hazard OWT radio- 
tv rep on Ford in Detroit) 



August 5. 1954 



Jack Reeser, Detroit 
Dear Jack: 



Hope you had a pleasant vacation. 
Looks like we may be able to con- 
vince K&E that Rosemary should 
not be kept off the Sullivan show 
for more than a month following her 
campaign for Ford. Since we are ask- 
ing her only to come along on an an- 
nouncement campaign of limited dura- 
tion, this provision should not cause 
any difficulty. 

Robert V. Ballin 
* * * 

August 6, 1954 
Robert V. Ballin, New York 
Dear Bob: 

Mitch tells me that Rosemary and 



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Jose Ferrer are expecting the stork, 
in January. Tv appearances this fall 
or winter are out until after the baby 
arrives. Which means that the whole 
question of her guest shots on Toast 
of the Town becomes purely academic. 
Joe Stone 



August 7, 1954 
Jack Reeser, Detroit 

Dear Jack: 

Looks like the Clooney spots are 
finally coming along. Joe and Mitch 
Miller have turned up a tune, "This 
Ole House," that is back-to-back 
with "Hey There" which is now going 
well. The boys ruled out "Hey There," 
although they liked it. because they 
feel it is too slow for a commercial 
which has to make as many points as 
Ford copy must. There is, too, the 
question whether a show tune would 
be available for commercial use. 

"This Ole House," while practically 
unknown now, has exciting possibili- 
ties, Joe reports. Musically, it appears 
perfect for commercial exploitation; it 
is fast, lively and novelty in character. 
And the Rosemary Clooney rendition 
of the number is tops. Joe and Mitch 
admit that there is no way to guaran- 
tee these things, but they feel rather 
strongly that this song has hit possi- 
bilities, and that these will be achieved 
by the time our version hits the air. 

You should shortly get a sample 
parody written by Joe and Dwight 
Davis. 

Robert V. Ballin 



August 7, 1954 
Jim Luce iJWT time buying head). 
New York 
Dear Jim: 

Some of the Ford District Commit- 
tees have already been in touch with 
us through the field reps. A few of the 
spot budgets have even been set, but 
we are holding off requesting avail- 
abilities until the latest practical mo- 
ment. If the pace holds up, we should 
wind up with one of the heaviest spot 
campaigns in our expereince. 

Richard Malkin (Ford 
time buying supervisor) 



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August 7, 1954 
Jack Reeser, Detroit 
Dear Jack: 

Good news! The deal for Rosemary 
Clooney is set. Joe Stone talked with 
her agent, Joe Shribman, today. Agree- 
ment calls for her to do one 60-second 
and one 20-second pre-announcement 
spot, and two 60-second and two 20- 
second post announcement spots. We 
will have the right to use the pre-an- 
nouncement pair for two weeks, the 
second group for a maximum of 30 
days. Price is high but in line with our 

former arrangements, running 

thousand. For Rosemary, this is a good 
deal, since our tremendous station 
lineup will be plugging "This Ole 
House." All that remains now is rou- 
tine clearance of the music rights. 
Robert V. Ballin 

* » * 

August 7. 1954 
Robert V. Ballin, New York 
Dear Bob: 

There will be a slight delay in sign- 
ing a contract for "This Ole House." 
The composer is on the road a good 
deal, according to Mitch. He is Stew- 
art Hamblen, who has the distinction 
of having run for the office of Presi- 
dent of the United States in 1952 — on 
the Prohibition Party ticket. Mitch is 
trying to locate him. In the meantime, 
we are working on the lyrics. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

August 15, 1954 
Robert V. Ballin, New York 
Dear Bob: 

Mitch has located Hamblen, in Cal- 
ifornia, where he makes his residence. 
The deal has been made and the con- 
tract is on the way. We have the right 



to use the number for 13 weeks, in the 
one-minute and the 20-second adapt. 
Joe Stone 
» * * 

August 29, 1954 
Miss Dorothy Gottschall (traffic 
dept i , New York 
Dear Dorothy: 

RE: Ford commercials for dealer 
1955 announcement campaign. 

Mitch Miller called to say that ar- 
rangements have been made with Ra- 
dio Recorders in Hollywood for a Sep- 
tember 30th recording session. Joe 
Stone will go out for the session. Your 
department will receive a tape of the 
announcements via air express. At the 
same time, Eric Jensen (JWT spot 
producer — Ed.) and I will be record- 
ing talking spots here in New York. 
Will you please follow through with- 
out delay on mastering and pressing? 
The disk is to have one side devoted 
to the musical, the other to the talk- 
ing announcements. 

Although the car announcement will 
be officially made on November 11. 
many of the dealers will be on the air 
much earlier. Some dealers, time buy- 
ing reports, want to be on as early as 
October 25. Please bear in mind, in- 
cidentally, that we shall need a disk 
for the field rep meeting which will be 
held in New York on October 18. 

Dwight Davis (radio-tv copy) 

August 30, 1954 
Jack Reeser, Detroit 
Dear Jack: 

Here at last are the jingle "roughs." 
Please keep in mind the following: (1) 
Although we will wind up with only 
three one-minute musical announce- 
ments and three 20-second adapts, we 
are submitting many more, all but one 
based on original tunes. (2) This is 
not a professional tape. Its purpose is 



to acquaint you in a somewhat better 
form than conversation or written de- 
scription with what we have in mind. 
(3) Try to imagine Clooney and her 
vocal support doing these to the snap- 
py direction of Miller. (4) Dwight Da- 
vis and I are no Met stars — we prob- 
ably couldn't even get jobs as singing 
waiters. But we feel that if you can 
stand our rendition, we must have 
something. Around here, a number of 
individuals — they shall be nameless — 
have begun to put cotton in their ears. 
In any case, please select your favor- 
ites out of the group. Hope you like 
them and that your clients think them 
as effective as we hope they will be. 
Joe Stone 

* * * 

Sept. 4, 1954 
Joe Stone, New York 
Dear Joe: 

We have chosen six of the musical 
spots and are indicating the choices 
on the copy. Leaving it to your hunch 
in New York to select the final group. 
In particular, we like the Clooney 
"This Ole House" version, and think 
it is going to do a big job. You are 
right. We survived your rendition, 
which convinces us more than ever of 
the soundness of the choice. 

I like Miller's suggestion that we 
follow the original version as closely 
as possible, using exactly the same 
quartet and orchestra. Part of the 
success in the performance of the orig- 
inal is doubtless due to the unique 
combination of talent and arrange- 
ment, and we might do well to dupli- 
cate it. 

Jack Reeser 

* • * 

Sept. 13, 1954 
Robert V. Ballin, New York 
Dear Bob: 

Mitch left this morning for the 
Coast. Last night at 10 p.m., Dwight 



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Davis and I went to see him. The ses- 
sion lasted to midnight. Mitch and 
his musical secretary, Jimmy Carrol, 
listened to our tape and with them we 
selected the final three numbers, one 
of which naturally was "This Ole 
House" We discussed the arrange- 
ments. One of the tunes was changed 
from a cowboy beat to a mombo, at 
Mitch's suggestion. The announcer on 
one of the 20-second bits will get into 
the actual beat. Session ended with 
Mitch and Carrol discussing details 
of arrangements while taxiing to the 
airport. 

Mitch will take care of rounding up 
Rosemary, the Mellomen and Ted Cole 
and his musicians in Hollywood. I'll 
be out there on September 25. Every- 
thing at last is going smoothly. 
Joe Stone 

* * * 

Sept. 25, 1954 
Dwight Davis (Ford copy group), 
New York 
Dear Dwight: 

Leaving for the Coast today. Will 

be at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Hotel 

will always know where to reach me 

if you call. Am meeting Mitch Sunday. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

Sept. 26, 1954 
Dwight Davis. JWT, New York 
(night letten 

Saw Mitch on arrival at hotel. Mel- 
lomen unavailable for afternoon Sep- 
tember 30 recording date owing to pri- 
or commitment. Clooney will not work 
at night, when they are available. She 
is unwilling to upset normal married 
life routine. Please inform traffic there 
will be a slight delay in taping. 

Joe Stone. Beverly Hills 

* + * 

Sept. 26, 1954 
Dwight Davis, JWT, New York 
(telegram i 

There will be a further delay in re- 
cording. Rosemary left today for Cin- 
cinnati. Her grandmother ill. Agent 
says she will not return to Hollywood 
till October 6. Mitch is going to New 
York September 30. He will be back 
October 7. 

* * * 

Joe Stone 
Joe Stone. Beverly Hills 
(airmail special) 
Dear Mr. Stone: 

Our station list has passed the 1,500 
mark. If we are to get the transcrip- 
tions out in time for October 25 date, 
we should have the tape here at least 
10 days in advance, to allow for nor- 
mal processing and shipping. This 
would mean by Oct. 15 at the latest. 
Dorothy Gottschall 
(traffic dept.) 

* * * 

Oct. 6, 1954. 
Dwight Davis. JWT, New York 
(telegram i 

Clooney is back. Please tell traffic 
we shall have recording date lined up 
by end of day. 

Joe Stone 



Oct. 6, 1954 
Dwight Davis, New York 
• airmail special) 
Dear Dwight: 

Forget what I said about an early 
recording date. Shortly after I wired 
you, Rosemary's agent, Joe Shribman 
called to tell me that she is not feel- 
ing well. Her doctor says she must 
stay in bed until October 12 at the 
earliest. We will do our best to get 
that tape to Dot Gottschall in time for 
the October 18 meeting in New York. 
If her department can suggest quick- 
er-than-normal operation, I'll be hap- 
py to do what I can at this end. 
Joe Stone 



Oct. 7, 1954 
Joe Stone, Beverly Hills, Calif. 
< telegram » 

Pressing company states that it must 
have tape by October 9 to get job out 
in time. Also field rep meeting ad- 
vanced to October 14. 

Dorothy Gottschall 
* * • 

Oct. 7, 1954 
Dorothy Gottschall, JWT 
(telegram > 

Propose we do master, pressings and 
mailing here. Possible to do whole 
job in three days under special deal. 
Please wire opinion. 

Joe Stone 



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Oct. 7, 1954 
Joe Stone. Beverly Hills 
'telegram > 

Shipment too large for remote con- 
trol operation. We prefer to handle 
problem directly. Please furnish us 
with tape as originally planned. WOR 
here will do master and pressings un- 
der our supervision. 

Dorothy Gottschall 
* * * 

Oct. 8. 1954 
Joe Stone, Beverly Hills 
< telegram ) 

Apologize waking you this morning 
7:30 a.m. Now another hitch. Net- 
work clearance claims possible simi- 
larity between our arrangement of 
Spot A and a non-public domain song. 
You are requested to make appropri- 
ate tune change. 

Sigrid Pederson. legal dept.. JWT 



Oct. 8, 1954 
Miss Sigrid Pederson, legal dept. 
JWT, New York (telegram) 

Don't apologize. Can't sleep anyway. 
Discussed legal request with Miller this 
morning. Change has been made. Just 
in time. We record part of the job 
without Clooney today. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

Oct. 8, 1954 
Dwight Davis, N. Y. < airmail special) 
Dear Dwight: 

We completed part of the job today. 
It was great to finally "get off the 
ground." We decided to go ahead even 
if Rosemary was not yet available be- 
cause we did not wish to risk having 
the rest of the bunch elsewhere when 
we were in a position to record her. 
Furthermore, Mitch assured me that 
it was possible to do a "tracking" job 
that would create a perfect illusion. 
This afternoon we recorded the or- 
chestra, male singers and announcer 
Bob Wilson. 

This kind of recording presents 
tough problems of timing, musical 
punctuation, etc., which require the 
utmost care. Everything has to be per- 
fect, for, once it is on tape, the musi- 
cal accompaniment to Rosemary's song 
becomes inflexible — so it just has to be 
right. It was a pleasure to see how 
smoothly the job went. As Mitch ex- 
plains it, the secret of successful 
"tracking" is meticulous planning, 
knowing in advance precisely what 
you are after. Today's experience 
shows how right that view is. 

Everything is now set for Tuesday, 
when Rosemary will at last be able to 
record. From now on it looks like 
clear sailing. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

Oct. 11, 1954 
Dwight Davis, JWT (telegram' 

Doctor says Rosemary cannot work 
tomorrow. Please tell traffic to expect 
tape day later than understood. 
Joe Stone 



Oct. 11, 1954 
Dwight Davis, JWT (telegram) 

Disregard earlier telegram. Milton 
Lewis at Paramount Pictures may pull 
strings and get a portable sound stu- 
dio to driveway of Rosemary's house. 
Hope now to record as scheduled. 
Joe Stone 
» * * 

Oct. 11, 1954 
Dwight Davis, JWT (telegram) 

Arrangements off again. Doctor 
won't let Rosemary record even in 
portable studio. Doesn't want her on 
her feet. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

Oct. 11. 1954 
Dwight Davis 
Dear Dwight: 

Could you please tell me the status 
of the recording of the Rosemary Cloo- 
ney commercials? 

Dorothy Gottschall 

* * * 

Oct. 11. 1954 
Miss Dorothy Gottschall 
Dear Dot: 

RE: the recording of the Ford com- 
mercials. Oh brother! 

Dwight Davis 

* * * 

Dwight Davis, JWT (telegram) 

Victory at last. Doctor agrees to let 
Rosemary record if she sits in wheel 
chair throughout. Recording set for to- 
morrow morning at studio. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

Oct. 12, 1954 
Joe Stone, Beverly Hills (telegram) 

Dwight Davis recording talking spots 
today at WOR. Detroit called him. 
Requested you change Clooney com- 
mercial. In phrase "Trigger Torque 
new power" change "power" to per- 
formance. 

Ray Karras (radio-tv copy. 
J. Walter Thompson) 

* * * 

Oct. 12, 1954 
Joe Stone, Beverly Hills (telegram) 

You are asked to disregard request 
to change copy. Dwight called Detroit. 
Pointed out that "performance" has 
three syllables, 'power" one. that im- 
possible to change copy at this stage 
when recording session is practically 
on. Told Detroit copy "has gone to 
press." Detroit accepted position. Lyr- 
ic okay as is. 

Ray Karras (JWT) 

* • * 

Oct. 12, 1954 
Dwight Davis. JWT (telegram" 

Thanks for clearing up "power" 
problem. Gong to studio to record. 
It should be all over today. 

Joe Stone 

* * * 

Oct. 12. 1954 
Dwight Davis, JWT (telegram) 

Recording accomplished. Rosemary 
wonderful. Tell you all about on re- 
turn. Made two tapes. Sending one 
ahead air express. Flying second to 
New York myself. First to arrive goes 
to mastering. Please inform traffic. 
Joe Stone 



102 



SPONSOR 



Oct. 13, 1954 
W. Eldon Hazard, Detroit 
Dear Hap: 

Joe arrived from the Coast today 
looking a bit worn, but victoriously 
blandishing his roll of tape. He beat 
the air express tape. I am informed 
that all hands are working on the an- 
nouncement job now. Traffic is sure it 
will get the pressings out to the sta- 
tions in time (there are now over 1,700 
on the shipping list) and promises an 
acetate for the October 14 meeting 
here in New York. So you can inform 
Jack that he will have a complete set 
of musical and talking spots to play 
at the meeting. We'll be very much 
interested in hearing the views of the 
dealers on this. After all that has been 
involved, and the not inconsiderable 
cost, we'd like to know that the Cloo- 
ney spots have hit the dealers as we 
hoped they would. 

Robert V. Ballin 

* * * 

Oct. 13, 1954 
Robert V. Ballin, New York 
Dear Bob: 

Now that I can sit back and draw a 
deep breath — the tape is finally out of 
my hands, and, as you know, in the 
efficient hands of our traffic depart- 
ment — I'd like to tell you a little about 
the recording session in Hollywood. 
You will recall that we had recorded 
everything but Rosemary's voice in ad- 
vance. We arrived at the studio with 
our tape, anxiously awaiting Rose- 
mary. She came in on time, accom- 
panied by Joe Shribman and a hand- 
some horse-sized Dalmatian dog whom 
she calls Baby. A playful character 
who wears a big jingling choker col- 
lar, Baby at first appeared a threat to 
a smooth performance. He turned out 
to be very well behaved, however, and 
caused us no trouble. His real name, 
incidentally, is Cuddles. 

Rosemary was outstanding. A great 
trouper. She drew up in her wheel 
chair, which Mitch rented locally for 
six bucks, and started to rehearse. A 
mix was to be made of her vocal and 
the music which we had recorded ear- 
lier. But it wasn't long before she 
found she couldn't sing while sitting. 
So, despite protests, she insisted on 
standing up for the session. Well, as 
I said before, she's wonderful. Went 
through the job with no hitches. We 
were out of the studio 45 minutes af- 
ter we had entered! 

So far as I can tell, the tape is per- 
fect. And we get the added value of 
the voice "presence" that Mitch says 
is one of the things you try for in 
'tracking." 

Now that it's all over, I hope it does 
the job we all thought it would. 
Joe Stone 

* * * 

Oct. 20, 1954 
Joe Stone and Dwight Davis, N. Y. 
Dear Joe and Dwight: 

Thought you might be interested in 
the following letter sent to Jack Reeser 
by the Kansas Ford District Commit- 



tee, for whom he played the announce- 
ments a few days ago. "In our opinion 
the most exciting part of the campaign 
is Rosemary Clooney singing 'This Ole 
House.' We consider it the best musi- 
cal commercial we have ever had and 
the finest to appear to date in the 
automobile field." 

W. Eldon Hazard 



49TH Cr MADISON 
{Continued from page I I I 

ARF REPORT 

Enjoyed reading article on ARF re- 
port in your November 29 issue. How- 
ever there is one inaccuracy which I 
am sure you will wish to correct. On 
pages 114 and 115 you have compared 
the ARF figures of multi-sel homes 
i including automobile radios) with 
Nielsen figure of multi-set homes (ex- 
cluding automobile radios). Page 94 
of ARF report shows 45.3% of radio 
homes have more than one radio set 
in working order (not including auto- 
mobile sets!. This 45.3% is the figure 
which compares with Nielsen's 45%. 
If you include automobile radio sets 
you should compare ARF's figure of 
66.2%. ion page 19 of their report I 
with a Nielsen figure of 6o.l', . which 
is the percentage of Nielsen's national 
sample represented by homes with 
more than one radio set, when auto- 
mobile radios are included. I think 
you will agree that this correlation is 
noteworthy and is one more evidence 
of the quality of the Nielsen sample. 
Jimmy James 
Vice President 
A. C. Nielsen, Co. 



WANTS FOLLOW-UP ARTICLE 

I have read, with particular interest, 
the December 13th SPONSOR feature 
article, "What buyers want in radio-tv 
trade ads." 

This feature confirmed many opin- 
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enlightening views. 

While timebuyers reactions to trade 
ads and mailing pieces may be similar. 
I'd like to learn through a future article 
in this series just what material the 
timebuyer wants in his files. My 
specific questions are: What percent- 
age of direct mail hits the w aste basket? 
Is it discarded because of shape or 
size that will not fit a standard filing 
cabinet? 

Glimore F. Frayseth 

Manager 

k Mill. Broadcasting Company 

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10 JANUARY 1955 



103 



RADIO FIGURES 

i Continued from page 43 I 

at first measure spot television. The 
report, which would he done quarterly 
covering a week of activity, would con- 
sist of: ill a chronological report, 
like a log, of when spot commercials 
were aired during the week: (2) a 
category report, in which the acti\it\ 
would be summarized b) product cate- 
gories, and (3) a "Commercial I \ 
posure Index" in which the total num- 
ber of seconds "I spol activit) and the 
average rating of the total would be 
listed by client name. This, said Hoop- 
er v.p. Bruce McEwen, would give an 
index of "the weight of spol activity." 
\ similar spot radio report mav fol- 
low later. Target date: April, 1955. 
• Pulse: V Pulse official told SPONSOR 
that tin- research organization intends 
doing "more work in the »|>ot field in 
1955." This i- likel) to take the form 
of special monitoring jobs i in which a 
station is air-checked for a whole week 
to spot new. unusual or competitive 
spot commercials I or special question- 
ing during regular roster rating peri- 
ods. These "riders" on the regular 
Pulse ratings are likelx to concern au- 
dience 'Tikes and dislikes" of spot 



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commercials and to check up on the 
audience's ability to "recall" copv 
points in spot broadcasting. 

What's going to happen in the mean- 
time? 

sponsor discussed the fact-gathering 
headache of spot radio with a number 
of leading timebuyers. Most of them 
indicated that they would just con- 
tinue to get their spot radio informa- 
tion the hard way until a better way 
< <>iil<l be found. "We're constantly be- 
ing asked to round up competitive in- 
formation on spot radio for our clients, 
particularly if a client is about to 
launch a spot drive of his own." said 
a ladj timebuyer at J. Walter Thomp- 
son. "I'd like tu stop playing Mata 
Hari around the radio reps, but it 
doesn't seem likelj that I will for quite 
awhile."' 

Thus until any or all of the spot 
radio plans mentioned above can get 
off the ground, agencies and clients 
are likely to continue to expend thou- 
sands of man-hours of checking and 
sleuthing. 

When a timebuyer sets out to find 
what the competition is buying in spot 
radio, the routine is fairly well estab- 
lished. From the agency viewpoint, the 
principal sources of competitive spot 
radio data are: station reps, leading 
radio stations, monitoring services, 
field representatives of the agency or 
client and various public advertising 
sources like the trade press or trade 
associations. 

If the heat is realU on the timebuy- 
er, he or she may have to check all of 
these sources. 

In most cases, the chase centers on 
finding out what markets the competi- 
tion is using and how much the com- 
petitors are spending. 

The simplest form of rounding up 
such data is usually a phone call from 
the timebuyer to the rep. "I can never 
tell if a timebuyer is going to place 
an order or if he wants to know who 
just did," the sales manager of a major 
rep hi in -aid. 

"I get at least three or four calls a 
da) which wind up in an attempt to 
pump me l<>i information, said an- 
other, adding. "The biggest head- 
ache'.'' When one of these buyers 
places an order, he is usually the first 
in -weai me I" secrec) . 

Do reps tip off agencies when the) re 
quizzed? The answei is a mixture ol 
\ es and no. 

"I might tell a -in. ill agent j t" go IK 



kid 



the salesman for a Madison 



Avenue rep firm stated, "but would I 
tell a P&G or a Colgate agency to do 
the same? I would not." In short, the 
bigger the agency or client the easier 
it is to come up with spot radio infor- 
mation about competitors. If an agen- 
cy is handling the spot radio billings 
of one of the advertising giants, reps 
— although they seldom admit it — are 
not above taking the initiative and 
calling buyers to pass on a tip. This is 
particularly true if the tipped-off cli- 
ent's usual reaction is to step up spot 
radio to meet the competition. 

When reps balk — and a few do — at 
handing out competitive information, 
veteran timebuyers have other meth- 
ods. Sometimes they may check a few 
of the nations key radio stations on the 
long-distance phone, seeking a rough 
idea of the opposition's buving pat- 
tern. Or, they may phone a long-time 
friend at a rival agency. 

(One resourceful spot buyer even 
made friends with a firm that handles 
the shipment of spot tv films and ra- 
dio transcriptions. Knowing the num- 
ber of "platters" or film announce- 
ments mailed out, and the destination, 
and the day b) which they were sup- 
posed to arrive, the buyer for a long 
time kept close tabs on the spot ac- 
tivities of a number of baffled com- 
petitors. One suspicious client, how- 
ever, caught on and plugged the leak, i 

If clients want ver\ detailed spot 
radio information, on a market-by- 
market basis, there are other — if time- 
consuming — methods. The general 
favorite is the station questionnaire. 

These log-like questionnaires — in 
which stations are supposed to list the 
type of activity, duration of campaign 
and day slots used by spot radio cli- 





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104 



SPONSOR 



ents — are usuallv sent out quarter!} in 
batches of nearly 1,000. 

Lever Brothers is probably the only 
major client who presently handles the 
mailing and processing of these station 
questionaires within its own shop. '1 he 
soap firm, in fact, has employed as 
many as six staffers just to handle this 
chore. 

\ formei Levei staffer, now an ex- 
ecutive of a major New York ad 
agency, described the big soap firm's 
sleuthing tactics in this fashion: 

"Lever has Keen querying radio sta- 
tions each quarter for nearly five years. 
Tv stations were once also queried, but 
tin- has largely been dropped since 
nearlv all the spot tv information re- 
quired can be found in the Rorabaugh 
Report. 

"It is a big job. As many as 800 
questionnaires will be sent to a cross- 
section list of radio stations in all 
parts of the country. The question- 
naires have divisions in which stations 
are- asked to list the spot radio activ- 
it\ of all the major brands of soaps, 
detergents, toiletries, beauty products 
and food that compete nationally or 
regionally with Lever products. 

"Stations and reps gripe like hell 
about filling them out. But, when I 
was with Lever, we used to get be- 
tween 50^? and 60' "> return from our 
mailings. 

''The results are often punched up 
on IBM machines so that special data 
could be sorted out. You know — 
breakdowns of the competition by day 
and night segments, in station breaks, 
spot announcements and programs. 
We even evolved a weighting formula 
to determine the estimated dollar ex- 
penditures of competitors in spot radio. 

"In a few cases, special monitoring 
jobs were ordered to check directly on 
the copy techniques used by com- 
petitors in launching new products or 
in setting up test campaigns. This can 
run into real money. In fact, I believe 
it would cost about $1,200 a year just 
to monitor spot radio in the New 
York market." 

Although Lever Brothers is the only 
major client that does its own check- 
ing on spot radio broadcasting, a num- 
ber of big agencies use similar mail 
surveys to check on the activities of 
competitors. 

These agencies include: Compton 
(clearing house for P&C spot radio 
data i. BBDO, J. Walter Thompson, 
Ted Bates. William Esty, Y&R, Cun- 
ningham & Walsh and SSCB. For the 



most part, the\ conduct their checkup?. 
to gather information on the spot radio 
activity in the soap and detergent, 
cigarette, food and automotive fields. 

This questionnaire technique is cur- 
rently being used by N. C. Rorabaugh 
to gather information on spot tv from 
more than 250 television outlets, and 
forms the basis for his Rorabaugh Re- 
ports. The same technique, using a 
panel of some 600 or 700 radio out- 
lets, is planned by researcher Jim 
Boerst in his collaboration with Rora- 
baugh on the Spot Radio Register. 

Why would broadcasters, who hate 
to fill out questionnaires, be willing in 
most cases to do so for a private data- 
gathering service? This is how Boerst 
put it to sponsor: 

"Each quarter of the year reps and 
leading radio stations get anywhere up 
to a dozen questionnaires from Lever 
Brothers and the big agencies. It takes 
hours of work to fill them out. Most 
station men and reps I've talked to say 
they'd far rather fill out just one form 
than a small mountain of them." 

The Boerst-Rorahaugh proposals 
aren't new-. As far back as 1934, the 
then-owner of Publisher's Information 
Bureau. Anne Edgerly. started a sys- 



tem whereb) stations reported their 
spot radio activit) directlv, to her. But 
she nevei got much more than 
ol the nation's radio stations lined up 
for the plan, and dropped it in L939. 
\t that time, V < . Rorabaugh started 
a radio report in which the informa- 
tion came from data supplied 1>\ agen- 
i ies. Bui this, too, neA ei proA ided ad- 
men with a complete picture; too many 
big client- wanted the information on 
competitors all right, but were reluc- 
tanl to part with their own. Rora- 
baugh sold his spot radio service to 
Boerst in 1052. Miss Kd»erl\ tried 
again in L950 with a variation of her 
original plan, but the system never 
got off the drawing boards. In I'M!!. 
Rorabaugh started his present spot tv 
report; it- been a success principally 
I c ause it managed to grow along 
with tv instead of having to tackle the 
problem of surveying stations after 
most were established. 

Boerst and Rorabaugh feel the 
chances for success of their proposed 
station-reported Spot Radio Register 
are good today for two reasons: 

1. Agencies and broadcasters alike 
sa) they are tired of the necessity for 
cloak-and-dagger tactics in spot radio, 



1/KOW Couirifty... 



Bigger than St. Louis! 

The 50 county market covered by Wis- 
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bigger than St. Louis in retail sales, 
more than twice as big as Milwaukee. 
Like these metropolitan areas. wKOW 
COUNTRY is a group of shopping cen- 
ters. Unlike them, however, the land 
between one rich wKOW COUNTRY 
shopping area and the next produces 
valuable farm products and an av er- 
age annual family income of $6,921 
for the producers. Madison, the capital 
of wKOW COUNTRY, with over 
105,000 population, lias an average 
spendable income per household ol 
88,067. You can sell it all at bargain 
rates on WKOW at one-fifth the price 
you pay for St. Louis, one-hall the 
price for Milwaukee. 




WKOW 

MADISON, WIS. 



CBS 

Affiliate 



Represented by 
HEADLEY REED CO. 



10 JANUARY 1955 



105 



and would welcome an end to the 
problem. 

2. The Rorabaugh tv report has 
shown that station-reported data is 
practical and time-saving. Tv stations 
are not inundated b\ the same bad hi - 
"I agencj questionnaires sent to radio 
cutlets. 

But questionnaires d<> not solve an- 
other problem which sometimes plagues 
agencies and advertisers in spot radio: 
qualitative data. This is a held in 
which the sleuthing takes on all the 
elements of a "G-2" hunt for a big 
spy ring and in which many of the 
tools of counter-espionage are used. 

Principally, the job is one of moni- 
toring radio outlet- i and tv outlets, 
I".' i to hunt for new and unusual spot 
commercials the was a I .S. radar -l.i- 
tion -weeps the skies on the watch for 
unidentified aircraft. 

Some agencies — like Y&R, McCann- 
I rickson, and Donahue and Coe, to 
name just three — do a lot of their own 
monitoring jobs, hiring people to lis- 
ten or view lor hour- or to tape-record 
sound portions of commercials. 

But a number of independent firms 



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have facilities to monitor stations on a 
special order basis : 

Radio Reports. Inc.: This 18-year- 
old New ^ oik firm conducts two kinds 
of monitoring in the radio-tv field. The 
hi-t of these is similar to what is done 
by press "clipping services" — that is. 
Radio Reports monitors up to 17.000 
radio and tv programs per month. 
checking for publicit) mentions of 
I roducts and personalities, special "sa- 
lute" shows, and the like. \t the same 
time, through its Spot Monitoring Di- 
vision, Radio Reports also monitors 
local-level spot commercials and net- 
work cut-ins in 300 radio and 50 tv 
markets in 1 I states. For the most 
I ii I. these spot reports are checkups on 
how commercials were handled, what 
the adjacent ie- were, and what errors 
maj have Keen made. I sually, handi- 
capped people are employed to do this 
radio and tv spot monitoring. '"Shut- 
ins are the most attentive radio and 
tv audiences." explains Si Nathanson, 
a Radio Reports v.p. In several key 
areas (such as New England, New 
\ oik. Philadelphia. Detroit, Chicago, 
I. os Angeles and San Francisco) Ra- 
dio Reports ha- branch offices equipped 
to make transcripts of special spot ra- 
dio and tv commercials, such as mighl 
he used in a test campaign. Spot 
monitoring charges: 45c and up for a 
one-minute radio spot announcement: 
$1.05 and up for tv. including a sim- 
ple "log" report. Full radio tran- 
scripts, available in cities mentioned 
a I iove, cost 7c per typed line, mini- 
mum $7.00. Tv transcripts are 9c a 
line, minimum $9.00. Photograph) 
service (pictures made from the tv pic- 
lure tube I are available in New York. 

Broadcast Idvertising Reports: This 

firm, headed bs I'hil Fdwards, is un- 
der option current!) In A. C. Nielsen, 
as mentioned earlier. It has been in 
existence for about two years, and has 
been supplying agencies and stations 
with regular reports of Spot land local- 
level i radio-tx ad\erlising in four ma- 
jor market-: New York, Chicago, I'hil- 
adelphia and Washington. Ii\l! in- 
loi uialion i- obtained b\ tape record- 
ing the schedules ol leading stations in 
each market for a full week, usualls 
on a quarterl) basis. The service is 
expensive one agencyman said that 
BAR coverage foi -pot radio in a ma- 

joi market would < osl as much a- 
S blO lot a lull week ol taping. The 

tapes .ire then gone ovei b) research- 
ers who write a special report. * * * 



TV RATES 

{Continued from page 38) 

scale. Each dot shows the 20-second 
rate per circulation of a station, though 
in some case> the dot stands for more 
than one station. About 150 mature tv 
stations were used." 

Dorrcll pointed out that if rale- 
varied exactly with circulation — that is, 
il the cost-per-1 .000 -el- in each sta- 
tion's area was the same — all of the 
dots would lie in a straight line. The 
fact that they do not, he said, proves 
that circulation vs. rate \aries from 
market to market. 

"However," Dorrell continued, '"it 
will be noted that these points do tend 
to cluster around a line drawn through 
the points. The curved line on the 
(hart has been drawn by sight and is 
not necessarilv mathematicallv exact. 
But it does show 'some' relationship 
between rates and circulation." 

Dorrell warned against assuming 
that a station is a "good" or "bad" 
bu) because it lies above or below the 
line and pointed out, "There may be 
good reason for this tremendous vari- 
ance in circulation vs. rate. The rea- 
sons may be audience as determined 
b) ratings, competition, market size. 

From talks with other authorities on 
the question of station rates, SPONSOR 
found agreement on this point: The 
biggest sintile factor in explaining the 
variance in cost-per-1. 000 circulation 
is station audience as indicated by rat- 
ing services. This, then, is obviously 
basic: no station rate can be too far 
awa\ from reflecting the stations audi- 
ence. But this is not to say that there 
is an exact relationship between sta- 
tion rates and station audience. As the 
problem was explained b\ one network 




"It's as easy as listening to 
KRIZ Phoenix." 



106 



SPONSOR 



research executive: 

"One reason you can't pin down the 
relationship between audience and rates 
is that there is no agreement on which 
rating service is correct. You'd have to 
have all the broadcasters and all the 
aiKertisers agree on one standard 
rating service and I don't have to tell 
\ou tliat it'll be a cold da) in July 
when that happens." 

Some of the authorities made the 
point that there is also disagreement 
in defining the broad area of a station's 
circulation, let alone audience. The dis- 
agreements I 1 I start with engineering 
estimates of how far out the station's 
Munal goes. (2) continue with dis- 
agreements on how strong the signal 
should be in a given area or home to 
be considered adequate reception and 
(3) end up with disagreements of the 
degree to which one station's signal 
overlaps another's. The disagreements 
on overlap are particularly applicable 
in setting up network rates (since 
advertisers don't want to be charged 
twice for the same home) but also 
affect spot rates. 

Another factor in the relationship 
between rates and circulation or rates 
and delivered audience is the size of 
the market. It is commonly under- 
stood that costs-per- 1.000 in a large 
market are usually less than in a 
small market. 

This is shown clearly in the Dorrell 
chart. Taking costs-per-1.000 potential 
circulation from the line drawn through 
the dots, here's what shows up ( these 
are not actual station rates, but rough 
theoretical "averages") : For 200,000 
circulation, a 20-second announcement 
i ost about $100 or 50c-per- 1,000. For 
500,000 circulation, the figure is about 
35c. For 2.000,000, the cost is less 
than 22c. 

The extent to which demand and 
supply affects spot rates is hard to pin 
down since there are no universally- 
accepted standards for station rates 
and. hence, no way of saying flatly 
that a station's rates are way out of 
line. But agency as well as station 
people left no doubt that there are 
plenty of occasions where rates are 
hiked because of the long lines of 
aiKertisers seeking availabilities. The 
tone of reactions was not the same in 
all cases, however. 

Said an important media man at one 
of the top air agencies: "One of the 
nation's big stations recent Iv raided 
its spot rates although there was no 
evidence that circulation or viewers 



were appreciabb up. The station just 
figured that it so mam advertisers were 
trv ing to get on, the station must have 
something extra. At least, that's what 
the) said and who can say they're 
wrong?" 

A network executive had this to -a\ 
about the economics of supply and 
demand : 

"I don't think that stations ask 
themselves: 'What will the traffic bear?,' 
and then set their rates accordingly. 
\et, in the last analysis, all prices in 
a free economy are determined bv what 
the traffic will bear. Stations have to 
compete with other stations and tv 
has to compete with other media. If 
their prices are too high, why adver- 
tisers will stop buying and prices will 
come down. If advertisers keep on buv- 
ing, why, then they must be getting 
their money's worth." 

Said an agency research executive: 
"I think some of the stations are getting 
out of line in jacking up their rates. 
There's no justification for some of 
the new spot rates. The audiences 
don't justify the increases." 

To some on the advertiser's side of 
the fence, the lack of a standard in 
determining rates is inevitable and. 
possibly, desirable. Here's how one 
respected timebuyer, a veteran of two 
decades in the business, put it: 

"There was never any standard in 
radio and there won't be one in tv. 
Not even if the NARTB ever gets its 
tv set count going on a regular basis. 
Circulation and program audience are 
important, but they are not the onlj 
factors in determining rates. Take two 
television stations in markets that 
are comparable except for the fact that 
the per capita buv ing power in one 
market is much higher than another. 
^ oil shouldn't expect the station in the 
richer market to charge the same rate 
as the station in the poorer market. 
Equal-sized markets differ in other 
ways, too. Sometimes a market i- 
much more important than its popu- 
lation indicates because it is an 
important wholesale or distributing 
center. 

"Then there's that indefinable thin- 
called station character or personalis. 
You can't always define it exactly in 
terms of dollars but it's there and it's 
worth monev ." 

One reason for complaints about 
rates — the lack of station competition 
in important markets — is gradualb 
disappearing. Not only are the big 
single-station markets going out but 



the rapid growth in post-freeze video 
outlets i> iin i overlapping and, 

hence, competition. I here are expecta- 
tions thai some stat ions network i 
ma\ drop in L955. These decreases 
inav average onl) $2 i to ! »0 per sta- 
tion but when thai s multiplied b 
lew dozen stations and then multipl 
bv ~>2 weeks, the saving- add up. And 
ii is possible thai spot rates ma\ be 
.,11. < ted as well. • • • 



RADIO-TV NETWORK 

(Continued from page 39) 

common. Admiral i which sponsors 
Hi -hop Sheen on DTN), Coca-Cola 
i which sponsors Eddie Fisher on NBC 
I \ i and Chesterfield (which sponsors 
Perry Como on CBS TV) all have the 
taped versions of their tv shows on 
Mutual. Firestone Hour and Breakfast 
Club are simulcast on ABC as is God- 
frey on CBS. 

Mutual gives this example of it- 
non-tv coverage: The net has a total 
of 2,487,000 (average) radio listeners 
to its Queen for a Day (sponsored on 
both am and tv by Old Gold cigarettes) . 
Of the radio listeners, 69.2% (1,721.- 



"Spec 



ialized 



Programming 
REACHES, 

SELL S 

L os IWles ■» 



WarKct 

"ON* **t\ 
Mexican - 



10,000 WATTS 

Transmitter: Los Angeles, California 
Executive Offices: Santa Monica, California 

National Representatives: 
Forjoe & Co. New York, Chicago, 

Dallas, San Francisco 
Dora-Clayton Atlanta, Georgia 

GEORGE A. BARON, Gtn'l Mgr. 



11; 



10 JANUARY 1955 



107 



BIGgest TOWER 



TOPmost POWER 



in the Heart of America | 



KMBC-TV, the BIG TOP 

station, dominates the Kansas 
City market as no other station 
can! Using full 316,000-watt 
power and 1,079-foot tower, 
Channel 9 covers thousands of 
additional TV homes. For cov- 
erage details and choice avail- 
abilities, see your Free & Peters 
Colonel. 

Note : full-power, 

tall-tower operation 

from Sept., J95.J. 

FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 



Bojic CBS-TV affiliate 



w 





KMBC Building, 11th & Central Sts. 
Kansas City, Missouri 



KMBC-TV H 

The BIG TOP Station 
in the Heart of America 

KMBC — Radio, Kansas City, Missouri 
KFRM — Radio for the State of Kansas 



WSJV-TV 

GOES UP IN 
POWER 

NOW MORE THAN EVER 

YOU GET COMPLETE 

COVERAGE 

in the 

SOUTH BEND - 
ELKHART MARKET 

For availabilities and rates see your 

H-R TELEVISION MAN 

WSJV-TV 

ELKHART, INDIANA 

John F. Dille, Jr. President 

John J. Keenan, Commercial Manager 



000 people) do not have a t\ set. 
Conversly. only 30.8%— or 766,000— 
do own l\ -els. This is based on its 
recenl .1. \. \\ ard Survej . 

\ number of admen contacted by 
SPONSOR said that in order to fill in 
the non-U areas, it would be more 
efficient to use spot radio. And Joseph 
I. Weed, president of Weed Tv Corp. 
and founder of Weed X Co.. station 
representatives, said the areas not 
reached by the network tv show might 
be < overed via spot tv. "My first sug- 
■ji ■-lion, based mi the fact that it's 
basically a t\ campaign, is that the 
advertiser first explore the possibility 
ul using local tv stations not identified 
with the original network campaign in 
any available area. 

" \itcr checking tv spot availabilities, 
the logical thought is to carry the 
message into non-tv markets via spot 
radio. Via spot radio exact avail- 
abilities can be checked by a station 
representative firm and an advan- 
tageous selection made. 

"Network radio, while reaching some 
non-tv areas, would also mean over- 
lapping in the many combined radio-tv 
markets. The use of spot tv and/or 
radio would be the more practical 
means of reaching the pin-pointed 
areas not contacted via the original 
tv network station lineup.'" 

******** 
'*We will continue to need (in both 
radio and television) aggressive and 
intelligent salesmanship. It might not 
be too early to suggest, in view of recent 
developments, that such salesmanship 
should be positive in nature. Our prod- 
uct, whether radio or television, is a 
good product — and one need not berate 
the other in order to prosper." 

HAROLD E. FELLOWS 

President 

1SARTB 

******** 

Another thought was advanced bj 
Noel A. Rhys, vice president & eastern 
-ales manager of the Keystone Broad- 
casting System. "Populationwise, the 
Rev stone Network with 700 affiliates 
<o\ri- |ua< ticallv all areas not ade- 
quate!) served bv television. These 
Stations, apart from being beyond these 
merchandiseable t\ areas, also reach 
small town and rural America where 
radio still is dominant. Furthermore. 
the majorit) ol KI5S stations operate 
on the local level and arc beyond the 
dependable coverage ol metropolitan 
stations. I!li\s also pointed to the 
flexibilit) of KBS to lit in with the 
pai ti< ul. ii ■ o\ ei age pattei ns ol adver- 
i isei s. * * * 



SMALL TV CLIENTS 

(( onUnued from ]>age 39) 

It is low program costs which keep 
the participations at an economical 
level and fairly competitive on a cost- 
per-1,000 ba-i- with other network 
offerings. Half of the six shows peg 
program prices at the S400-to-$600 
level per participation. In all cases, 
the bulk of the price per minute com- 
mercial is for time charges. Time and 
talent charges for all six range from 
11,800 to $7,400 per minute. The 
lower-cost minutes are for regional 
networks. 

Cost-per- 1,000 homes figures range 
from about $3 to $5. Even the top 
cost-per-1,000 is lower than the aver- 
age of any type of evening half-hour 
network show, acording to Nielsen 
figures. In comparing participations 
with half-hour evening shows on a 
basis of cost-per-1,000 homes reached 
per commercial minute, the half-hour 
show figures come down substantially, 
of course. But even here the partici- 
pations are considered competitive. 

Network tv participations certainly 
do not exhaust the available uses of 
video for the small advertiser. There 
is also spot, which is widely used by 
all sorts of advertisers. Its flexibility 
enables the small advertiser to fit it to 
his budget more easilv than network. 

The following figures, assembled by 
BBDO, show August 1954, spot time 
costs for both Class "A" and "C" time. 
The figures are for both the top 40 
and 60 markets and give the totals of 
one-time rates for the highest-priced 
station in each market: 

For 40 markets (potential: 80' i of 
all tv homes) — daytime minutes, $3.- 
946; daytime I.D.'s. 81,873; nighttime 
chainbreaks. isO.OOO: nighttime I.D.'s. 
$4,725. 

For 60 markets i potential : 90' - of 
all tv homes i davtime minutes. $5.- 
091; davtime I.D.s. *2,443; night- 
time < liainbreaks. #12.120: nighttime 

I.D.'s, $5,935. 

With these limine- a- a base it's ap- 
parenl the small advertisei < an build a 
spot tv campaign on budgets of vary- 
in- amounts. In 10 market'- at a five 
a week Frequency foi 13 weeks, for 
example, an advertiser Could use dav- 
time minutes at little ovei S200.000 
figuring in the discounts) . * * * 



108 



SPONSOR 



RADIO IMPACT 

(Continued from \><i^e 39) 

familiarity, intimarv 

• The gravitation ol products which 
profit most from visual demonstration 
toward tv — leaving on radio largely 
products which can he sold well via car 
o The changing motivations of the 
consumer over the past years, neces- 
sitating a basic change in cop) 
approach 

• Some loss of "advertising-suscept- 
ible" people from the radio audience 
— largeh those who were the first to 
rush out and buy tv — leaving a larger 
number of those who were always hard 
to sell. 

People have a reservoir of good will 
toward radio because of the age and 
old familiarity of the medium, accord- 
ing to findings of the Institute for 
Research in Mass Motivations. It is 
common, states Dr. Ernest Dichter, 
president of the Institute, for people to 
develop a relationship with their local 
radio station almost as with a familv 
doctor. And. as with the doctor, thej 
are generally quite willing to accept 
advice from it. In a study that the 
Institute recently made for a radio 
network station I which was the oldest 
in its area and had built a good local 
following by using an easy-going, 
relaxed approach I . it found that 73% 
of the people interviewed would take 
buj ing advice from a local station 
which they knew : well. This particular 
station had been getting an excellent 
response to its commercials, says 
Dichter, far better than another net- 
work station in the community which 
had built a more glamorous, formal, 
big-city aura. 

Radio could heighten its commercial 
effectiveness, says Dichter. if it would 
sharpen up its understanding of 
changes in consumer motivations over 
the past years. For example, today 
the consumer knows more, is more 
sophisticated, wants better tilings but 
things made expressly for him, wants 
to have more fun and to enjoy the 
good things of life sooner. 

In its testing of radio commercials, 
Schwerin Research has also come up 
with some interesting findings I spon- 
sor, 20 September 1954 ) . Commercials 
tested recently, for instance, were on 
the average more effective than those 
in 1947-48 in achieving remembrance, 
belief, says Schwerin. This, the organ- 
ization believes, mav be due partlv t<> 
the gravitation to t\ of those products 

10 JANUARY 1955 



w hich needed t\ the mosl I foi demon- 
stration purposes) — which "automatic 

screening process" has tended to make 
the average effectiveness of those com- 
mercials remaining on radio higher. 

However, it is possible to sell a 
'visual" product effectively via radio 
provided the eopv paints an effective 
"ear picture," according to Allan 
Greenberg, Research Department Man- 
ager, Grey Advertising. He points to 
a bra manufacturer client of the 
agency for whom they have been 
running commercials on both radio 
and tv | Exquisite Form). Radio, says 
Greenberg, has been as proportionately 
effective for this item as tv. So long as 
the copy and other elements that go 
into the commercial are designed 
exclusively for the auditory medium — 
not parti) for video, part for audio — 
vou have a good chance for high 
impact, he feels. 

Greenberg advances the theory that 
it mav be harder to sell via radio today 
not because of tv, but because of a 
particularly hard-to-sell audience. It 
may well be, his theory runs, that the 
most susceptible people, advertising- 
wise, were the first to acquire tv sets 
and be influenced bv tv"s razzle-dazzle 
and commercials. Those most exposed 
to radio's commercials lodav are lai Lielv 



*'To be a successful advertiser: make 
a quality product; strive to maintain and 
improve the quality; price it at its true 
value; make it readily available; adver- 
tise truthfully and in good taste; adver- 
tise to the right people ; reach the great- 
est number of people consistently. . ." 
M. A. MATTES 
Manager of Advertising 
Standard Oil of Cat. 



those who are tougher to sell, he 
ventures, but they were not tougher to 
sell than before tv came on the scene. 
The biggest motivator of attention 
to a commercial in any medium is 
natural interest, says Charles Ramsey. 
"A person who is in the market for 
a new car, for instance, will be acutely 
aware of and listen to anything and 
even thing on the subject of new cars 
for the duration of his interest i which 
generally lasts until he has actually 
pin chased the carl", says Ramsey. 
"But if he does not have am in teres) 
in a product or a service, a person 
mentallv times out even the best- 
written commercial. So your radio 
impact parti) depends on how receptiv e 
people are to your product at the time 
thev hear vour commercial. * * + 




HE LAND OF 

MILK AND3*ONEY 




lOOOOO^TTTt 

INTERCONNECTED CBS, ABC, 

DUMONT, 55 COUNTIES 

Haydn R. Evans, G. Mgr. WEED-TV 



TOP TWO... 

CBS IN COLUMBUS, GA. 

WRBL RADIO 

5-KW 

(INCS 1952 — 40-100', ) 

Population 418,600 

E. B. Income (000) §519,137 
Retail Sales (000) $257,776 

WRBL-TV 

channel 4 

(Pulse Area Survej Nov. *54) 

Population 737.910 

E. B. Income (000) $785,909 
Retail Sales (000) $442,308 
Source SM Mm 1954 



% te 







COL UMBOS, GEOZ6/A 



m 



CALL -HOLL/NG-BETZy 



If Your Market is 

MINNEAPOLIS 

ST. PAUL 

NOW 

IS THE 

TIME 



to see your 




television representative 

. . . about choice availabil- 
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...you can buy maximum 
power at minimum cost 
on the Upper Midwest's 
new Channel 9 station 

. . . ask your H-R man 
about KEYD-TV's "in- 
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FOSHAY TOWER 

Minneapolis 
Represented Nationally by H-R TELEVISION, INC. 




Vincent II. Bliss is the newly elected president 
of Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago. Earle Ludgin 
himself was elected to the new post of board 
chairman. John //. Willmarth is the new executive 
vice president and general creative director. An- 
othei ncu v.p.—the first woman to hold such a 
post at Ludgin — is Jane Daly, radio-tv director. 
Bliss joined the agency in 1932 as a vice president. 
In 1916 he was elected executive vice president. 
Ludgin has headed the agency since he founded 
it in 1927, will continue in active role. 



Iffoipfi J. Toigo 15 another newly-elected agency 
president : he lifetime president of l.ennen & 
Newell, Inc., New York, succeeding the late Her- 
man Wilson Newell, who died late last month. 
Thomas (.. Butcher was elected executive vite presi- 
dent of the agency. Toigo has been executive vice 
president and general manager of L&N since its 
formation in 1932. Toigo' s working career began 
when he was only 14: after a full day of school he 
worked as a mule driver 12 hours daily. He has 
a I'h. I), in English. 



Melville K. Ilissvil. III. vice president and 
director of marketing lor the Hissell ( tirpet 

Sweepei Co., made news when his company ninth 
has used almost no radio and little tv in its his- 
tory signed ioi a 12-month schedule on \ IK. 71 . 
Inning about four participations weekly on Home 
ami Today. Reason foi tv, sins Hissell: "Personal 
demonstrations in selling never have been repbu eil. 
and with tv . . . we'll be aide to make more than 
233-million personal demonstrations of need for a 

carpet sweepei in 1955." igency: N. W.Ayer. 



Itufpfi It. Ilotrhliiss. the man who created the 

tami/itir "Look Sharp" and "Hon Are ) a Fixed 

for ninths" animated tv jingles lor Gillette, is 
im/iing ComptOn Advertising. Inc., as a vice presi- 
dent mi 15 February. Hotchkiss, who has been 
v.p. and account executive at Waxon, Inc., Detroit, 
since 1945, has created inure than 300 tv commer- 
cials yet before World Wai II he spent 17 years 
m II all Street as a financial unlet and editor. 

It < ompton he'll unil, on an iinnamcil Special 

assignment, reporting to R. D. Holbrook, president. 



110 



SPONSOR 



THINKING? 




INDIANA 




This ii WAVE-TV'S coverog 
area, bosed on engineering 
studies and moil response. 



KENTUCKY 






If you're thinking about a way to reach 
the biggest TV AUDIENCE in Kentucky 

and Southern Indiana — 
ASK YOUR REGIONAL DISTRIBUTORS ! 

Pick up the phone right now— talk with your distributor 

in Louisville 

—then in Evansville (101 air miles) 
—then in Lexington (78 air miles) 

Ask them all this question, "What Louisville TV station do 

your neighbors prefer?" 

Spend the few bucks now— save many on your results! 



WAVE-TV 



CHANNEL 



3 



LOUISVILLE 



FIRST IN KENTUCKY 

Affiliated with NBC, ABC, DUMONT 




I SPOT SALES 

National Representatives 




10 JANUARY 1955 



111 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS_ 



Spot radio's cloak-and-dagger 

\\ hen a timebuyer is asked I" gel 
[acts "ii spot radio activity of com- 
petit' i!-. he's forced to become a cloak- 

and-daggei operative. Alone i g 

major advertising media, spot radio 
has no complete source of figures on 
client campaigns, spending. So the 
Inner holds whispered conversations 
with pals at oilier agencies, puts the 
bee on reps for the tip-ofl on what his 
competition i> doing. 

A number of important companies. 
directl) or through their agencies, sur- 
vey stations periodically for a break- 
down on activitj of their competitors. 
The cost i- great in manhours, incon- 
venience. \iid SPONSOR believes the 
cost i- great, too, in billings Inst to 
spot radio. 

II a lull list nl client- and expendi- 
tures could be made available, more 
business for the medium would follow. 

I here have been a number of efforts 
to solve this spot radio problem with 
the latest being a project of Jim Boerst 
and Duke Rorabaugb I see article this 
i — u<-. page 42). Jim is the publisher 



of "Spot Radio Report," a partial list- 
ing of spot radio activity which in- 
clude- accounts of (>n cooperating 
agencies. Duke Rorabaugb is well 
known as the publisher of the "Spot 
l\ Report, which i- based on reports 
from 2~>u cooperating t\ stations. 

While the Rorabaugb t\ report is 
regarded as a solid cro»— ection ol 
spot t\ activity, Boerst's '"Radio Re- 
port" omits many major spenders be- 
cause their agencies do not furnish 
information. The new combined ef- 
fort of Boerst and Rorabaugb will seek 
to get spot radio information directly 
from a cross-section of 600-700 radio 
stations. II successful, il - Imped the 
Boerst-Rorabaugh project would elim- 
inate the need for independent survey- 
ing of station- 1>\ clients and agencies. 

sponsor believes the best interests 
of advertisers, agencies and the spot 
radio medium will be served if stations 
cooperate in making spot figures avail- 
able — whether through the Boerst- 
Rorabaugh project or other means. 



Horace Lohnes 

The untimel) passing of Horace L. 
Lohnes. senior active partner in the 
Washington law firm of Dow. Lohnes, 
& Albertson, bring- to a close one of 
the most active and constructive ca- 
reers in the history of radio and tele- 
vision broadcasting. 

Some knew him as the genial host of 
the annual Federal Communications 
Association picnics. Some Tun indus- 
lr\ notables attended the outings at 
his estate not man) weeks ago. 

Some knew him as the creator and 
prime mover of \ itapix Corp.. designed 
to help television stations get high- 
grade film fare. Some knew him as an 



indefatigable worker for improvements 

and forward thinking in station, net- 
work, representative, FCC problems. 

lew advertisers and agencies fully 
understood the importance of Horace 
Lohnes on the commercial broadcast- 
ing scene. But his influence affected 
the air media in main wa\ -. 



Union irresponsibility? 

\l -i\ a. in. on the morning of I ues- 
da\ 11 December, supervising engi- 
neers coming to work at KPIX. San 
Francisco, discovered that the -taiioii 
bad been sabotaged. 

The station was off the air for 13 
hours, during which time it was dis- 
overed that hundreds of fuse- were re- 
moved and dumnn fuses inserted, 
equipment was hidden, tube- removed. 

On its own motion the FCC, alerl 
to its dut\ to the public, has instituted 
an inquirj . 

What particularly interests sponsor 
is the fact that union negotiations be- 
tween representatives ol \ ARF.T (CIO) 
and the KPIX management had been 
underway for several week-. Failing 
to agree on contract terms, the differ- 
ences had been submitted to the I . S. 
Mediation and Council Service with a 
meeting to be held on L5 December. 
But two days earlier the station was 
off the air. 

Beside the obvious interest of the 
public, sponsors were injured. Such 
irresponsible a< tions cannol be coun- 
tenanced. II inve-tigation bv FCC 
-hows that members of the union com- 
mitted these flagrant acts of sabotage, 
-tat ion managers as well as advertis- 
ers and agent ies should insist <m assur- 
ances from responsible union officials 
that even precaution will be taken to 
prevent occurrences ol this nature. 



Applause 



Tulsa's radio successes 

I he Associated I ulsa Broadcasters 
are starting the new year with a big 
push for radio. 

In a < oopet ative campaign radio -la- 
ic,- f Tulsa, KVOO, K 1 1 I . KOME, 
kl Ml. k I ,' \ H . K \K( . are pointing 
out to national buyers \ ia trade papei 
ads and reprints how good a sales- 
man radio i- foi lo< al adv i Misers. 



I he < ainpaign i- based on local suc- 
cess stories of interest to national buy- 
ei - o| radio advertising. I ai h station 
is supplying its national representa- 
tive with full information on the suc- 
, eg S stoi ies -how n in the t rade papei 
,:d- and, additionally . mam more. 

Cu-iav k. Brandborg, Assistant 
( General Manage] ol KVOO and origi- 
natoi of the new campaign, w i ites: "I 

hope our example will start like cam- 



paigns among othei radio groups 
around the country. After all. nation- 
al advertising is onlj local advertis- 
ing wholesale! 

Certainly, radio is big, persuasive, 
imaginative, and exciting. Advertisers 
will be hearing more about radio and 
its ability to sell during L955 than 
ever before. The Tulsa campaign is 
the New Year's harbinger of things to 
. dine. 



112 



SPONSOR 




KARK pulls 18 "firsts" among 24 morning quarter hours — 

3 times as many as all other Little Rock stations combined! 

— as reported by the March 1954 PULSE Area Study 



Your sales pitch, no matter how persuading, can't convince 
anybody who doesn't hear it. So why blow your budget 
on bigger signals that reach more dead sets? The station 
that pulls the biggest bonafide audience in the Little Rock 
market, the station actually listened to most, is KARK. The 
proof of the pulling is in the rating. And PULSE rates KARK 



tops — morning, afternoon and evening 66 quarter hour 
"firsts" out of 72. 

Why such popularity? For one thing, KARK is a habit and 
a good one— with Little Rock listeners. Dials have been fixed 
on 920 since 1948. Furthermore KARK programming includes 
the best of NBC. 



It's program popularity and proved listenership like this, rather than power alone, that attracts customers 
for you ... or to put it another way, it's not the reach— it's the PULL ! 

Advertise where people listen most, where the cost is low— on KARK! 




©© 



SEE YOUR 
PETRY 

MAN TODAY ' 







..'-**»• «L 




RADIO STATION. REPRESENTATIVES 



NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT BOSTON SAN 



HOLLYWOOD 



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C . tKCFiLttfl PLAZA 

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24 JANUARY 1955 



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RECEIVED 



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NBC— BASIC * ABC-DUMONT-CBS • WEED TELE VISIO N- N ATI ON AL REPRESENTATIVES 

TOWER 1049 FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL 



DO AGENTS HOLD 
TV COST REINS? 

page 35 



. 




pot radio 
"big push" in 1955 

page 38 



Esquire Boot Polish 
hits hard on tv — but 
not too often 



page 40 




Key questions from 
admen on the radio- 
year ahead; Part II 

page 44 



TV COMMERCIALS: 
WORD-LAZY? 

ge46 






-screen I.D. 
wins wide acceptance 

page 48 







4'A 



fit*/. 

m 

$A 




•* 



,t¥I 

mix 

vwm 

>awn 

«•!» 

MUft 



-*©> 



«ffl 







BLUE PLATE 
FOODS, INC. 

DOES A 
COMPLETE JOB . . 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 




UCHMON101? 




Maximum power — 
100,000 watts at Maximum Height — 
1049 feet 



With approximately 300 Blue Plate trucks serving over 
40,000 grocers from Washington, D. C. to the Mexican border, 
the Blue Plate Foods trademark is the symbol of quality in 
well-stocked kitchens. Appreciative and ever grateful viewers 
help to move Blue Plate Mayonnaise, Peanut Butter, Preserves 
and Jellies, Margarine and Sauces steadily throughout the South 
from the Richmond, Atlanta and New Orleans plants. 

Grateful and appreciative audiences are synonymous with 
Havens and Martin viewers and listeners. Their loyalty 
in Richmond and the rich surrounding areas throughout Virginia 
is a result of years of sincere public service combined with 
quality programming. Intelligent and wise spot placement makes 
the First Stations of Virginia, WTVR, WMBG and WCOD first 
choice for alert advertisers. Try us and measure the results. 



WMBG am WCOD ™ WTVR' 

FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 

Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBC represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 




B&M launching B&M beans is about to launch test in Midwestern market to determine 
tv-only test sales results when only television advertising is used. (Agency is 
BBDO, Boston.) For perhaps first time in ad history test will be 
reported on blow-by-blow basis starting next issue of SPONSOR. Test 
will last 6 months and figures on sales progress will be reported 
periodically in SPONSOR during that period. SPONSOR has long sought 
opportunity of this type and was instrumental in suggesting test. 

-SR- 
4 A's takes 4 A's has taken first officially published stand against rate deals, 
stand on deals excess merchandising demands, other efforts to pressure radio and tv 
stations. Document, planned for wide distribution via 4 A's, ANA 
NARTB and SRA mailings, isn't expected to bring any overnight changes. 
Thinking is that by going on record 4 A's can help timebuyer, for 
example, stiffen his resistance to suggestions from "upstairs" or 
client that he apply pressure for deals. (Text of 4 A's recommenda- 
tions on pages 42-43 this issue.) 

-SR- 
T-L adopts Tatham-Laird, Chicago, unifies buying of prin t and air in new media 
all-media buying division, with former radio-tv director, George Bolas, at head. Aim 
of reorganization is to make media buying "as creative as writing ad- 
vertisements or building plans," says A. E. Tatham, president. Y&R 
is classic example of big-radio-tv agency with integrated media buy- 
ing functions. (For details on major agency media organizations see 
article series in SPONSOR 26 July, 9 August, 23 August 1954.) 

-SR- 
N.Y.C. radio Since 1946 average New York City radio audience has increased 27.7% 
audience up during periods of local programing. That's highlight from study 

WCBS, New York, ordered from Pulse comparing total number of homes 
tuned in October 1946 vs. October 1954. Increase during 6-7 a.m. was 
105.7%, from 167,730 homes to 345,100; 8-9 a.m. jumped 62.5%; 6-7 p.m. 
is up 9.4%; 11 p.m. through 12 midnight is up 36.3%. (Local program- 
ing hours figures on basis WCBS' schedule.) 

-SR~ 
NBCbuya NBC's purchase of its first uhf station — WKNB-TV, New Britain — is 
lift for uhf se cond heartening not e for uhf broadcasters. It follows recent CBS 
purchase of uhf WOKY-TV, Milwaukee. Extent of uhf ' s problem is made 
clear when you consider 103 uhf stations have surrendered their con- 
struction permits compared with 21 vhf thus far. Some operators feel 
psychology has been important drawback, reason they gain stature with 
network 0&0's among u ranks. 

-SR- 
Full-screen I.D. New full-screen form of I.D. has won wide acceptance among tv sta- 
wins approval tions. By presstime 250 outlets had told SRA, which suggested stand- 
ards for new I.D., that they would take it. CBS TV owned tv stations 
expected to approve new standard by February. (List of 250 stations 
accepting full-screen I.D. thus far appears this issue pages 48-49.) 

SPONSOR, Volume 9, No. 2. 24 January 1955. Published biweekly bj SPONSOB Publications, Inc. Executive. Editorial. Advertising, Circulation Offices. 10 E. '.Kill St.. New 
York 17. Printed at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. $8 a year In IT s $0 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 Jan 1919 at Baltimore poetofflce under Act of 3 Mar. 1879 



1(1 IMMM TO SPONSORS for 24 January 1955 



Color set price 

bottleneck 



Cantor costs 
$5,000 in N.Y.C. 



WCAU '54 billing 
hits new high 



Tv stations 
squeeze eases 



WDTV, KVOO- 
TV join Vitapix 



$1.3 billion 
tv billings seen 



WBAL offers new 
discount plan 



There's agreement in most quarters 1955 will be anything but color's 
year. Sets at right price just aren't ready. RCA's latest estimate 
on number of color sets to be made during 1955 is 200,000 for all 
manufacturers. But it believes only about 160,000 will actually be 
sold. Last summer RCA figured there would be about 300,000 color- 
equipped homes by end of 1955. By end of first 10 months of 1954 — 
latest figures available — total of 17,445 color receivers had been 
produced, according to RETMA. 

-SR- 

P. Ballantine & Sons reportedly will pay $5,000 per episode for New 
York City showing of Ziv Tv Programs* "Eddie Cantor Comedy Theatre," 
which breaks nationally this week. Price paid by brewery is believed 
to be highest ever paid for syndicated film program, doesn't include 
time charges on WABC-TV for 10:30 p.m. slot Wednesdays. Ballantine 
also bought Cantor show in 20 other Eastern cities. During 11 weeks 
since it was announced, Ziv has sold show in 180 markets. 

-SR- 

Radio time sales for WCAU, Philadelphia, during 1954 were highest in 
32-year history. Local net revenue was up 6%, national spot revenue 
up 15% over 1955. Most significant '54 trend, says WCAU, is spon- 
sorship of 5-minute shows ; currently 51 of the 5-minute segments are 
sponsored each week. 

-SR- 

Tampa, Fla. , gets first vhf 5 February when WFLA-TV goes on air. 
It's one of 7 U.S. cities among "50 biggest" population category with 
paucity of operating tv stations (to date only one — uhf WSUN-TV, St. 
Petersburg). While some big markets have only one or 2 vhf ' s in 
operation, all but 4 of nation's top 233 markets ore covered by at 
least one station, according to figures from SSC&B's media research 
department. (See "Top radio-tv questions," question 10, page 45.) 

-SR- 

Almost simultaneously with Westinghouse acquisition of WDTV, Pitts- 
burgh, Joseph E.Baudino, WBC president, said station would join Vita- 
pix Corp. Few days earlier KVOO-TV, Tulsa, also joined Vitapix. 
Pittsburgh and Tulsa members, plus 14 new members announced as join- 
ing firm in December, raise Vitapix membership to 48 with at least 
2 more outlets reported ready to sign. Vitapix now claims its sta- 
tio ns cover 20 million tv homes . At SPONSOR presstime negotiations 
were continuing for New York and Chicago affiliates. 

-SR- 

Latest prediction on 1955 tv billings: $1.3 billion. That's 100% 
increase over 2 years ago, says prognosticator Robert W. Sarnoff , 
NBC executive v. p. Recently Ollie Treyz, TvB head, said tv in * 55 
would top $1 billion. 

-SR- 

Prevalence of short-term advertising recognized in new WBAL, Balti- 
more, rate card while at same time effort is made to e ncoura g e long- 
t erm clien t. Leslie H. Peard Jr., manager, said station would offer 
discounts for 12 or more programs or announcements broadcast within 
week's time in addition to regular discounts figured on yearly basis. 



SPONSOR 



-iHMa. i , 



complete coverage 

PHILADELPHIA 

trading_area 



MMIM Xflflw 



SUPER POWER 

316,000 WATTS Ch An 

WDEL-TV 

WILMINGTON 

PHILADELPHIA OFFICE 

1500 Walnut Street, Suite 1205 

Telephone Klngsley 6-4020 

STEINMAN STATION 



**l 



X? 



Represented by 

MEEKER TV, Inc. 

New York Chicago Los Angeles San Francisco 
24 JANUARY 1955 



advertisers use 




Volume 9 Number 2 
24 January 1955 



ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



Talent fluents: have then won control of tv costs? 

Two talent agents, William Morris Agency and Music Corporation of America, 
are a controlling factor in 38 out of 57 "name" shows on network tv. The 
network competition for names is playing into their hands, admen fear 

Spot radio's "hie/ push" ior lii.~t.~t 

Though spot radio business was off for some for first time last year, there is a 
new and growing "upbeat" feeling among radio reps and industry groups about 
the value of the medium and their ability to sell it during 1955 

Esquire polish hits hard on tv — hut not too often 

It's better to appear less frequently, but with impact, on a show with a big, 
changing audience than to get continued repetition on a program with a 
"loyal audience," Knomark Manufacturing Co. believes 

I \'s uyuinst rate ileals. merchanilisinu excesses 

Here are the 4 As first public recommendations on radio-tv to encourage 
high business standards, give timebuyers a "bible" to cite when asked to 
pressure stations for rate deals, extra merchandising, extra publicity 

I© top radio-tv questions for lf>55: Part II 

What changes may 1955 see in radio network operations, in spot radio promo- 
tion, tv spectaculars, tv station clearances, use of cut-ins on network tv? 

Are tv commercials yetting word-lazy? 

Trite words in tv commercials can kill good campaign ideas, warns Arthur Bel- 
laire, BBDO's v. p. in charge of radio and tv commercial copy. Copywriters must 
revitalize their word approach, search for fresh ways to express old ideas 

I he full-screen 1. 1*. 

Over half of U. S. tv stations will now accept the new full-screen I.D. proposed 
by the SRA. New format saves clients money by eliminating station call letters 

The record stores ratlio huilt 

For the past 14 years, radio has been the advertising mainstay of Washington, 
D. C.'s Super Music Stores. With air support owners Irvin and Israel Feld 
parlayed one small store into a many-faceted $2 million-plus operation 



SI»0\SOI. BMMA: II M -Id ( IMHI U !?»., I 



COM I NC 



K«\ if beans: step-hasten story of air campaign 

SPONSOR realizes a long-sought goal: to report on the sales results of a tv 
campaign as they happen. Test product: B&M beans. During the next six 
months, SPONSOR will follow this campaign with a continuing series of articles 

Are tv commercials qettinq picture-lazy? 

BBDO's Art Bellaire continues his observations on tv commercial ruts, goes into 
the pictorial aspect with examples of trite scenes, poses, camera angles 



3. 



Hit 



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til 



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Feb. 



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AGENCY AD LIBS 

49TH & MADISON 

TIMEBUYERS 

NEW & RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Wm. G. Mennen, Jr. 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 

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SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUND-UP 

NEW TV STATIONS 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



'I 

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Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glen 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard I 

Vice President: Jacob A. Evans 

Editorial Director: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. .1 

Associate Editor: Evelyn Konrad 

Department Editor: Lila Lee Seaton 

Assistant Editors: Keith Trantow, Al Zar 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe Cl 

Editorial Assistant: Florence Ettenberg 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice Pres.-Advg. Director: Robert P. Mer.dei 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coi 

(Western Manager), Homer Griffith 5c 

west Manager), Arnold Alpert (Midwes' M 

ager), Charles L. Nash 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz ( 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Mor'or 

Kahn, Minerva Mitchell 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott 

Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 

Accounting Department: Eva M. Senf 

Laura Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Janet Whittier | 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS! 
combined ulili TV. i Ed tonal, Clrculitic"" 

Advertising Offices: 10 E. 19th si M'.uh A M»- 
New Wk IT, N. Y. Telephone: MUrra) 

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i o 8087 sunset BouM 

Phone H ■•■ I I'llntlnn "nice 310 

Ave . Baltimore 11, Mil. Subscription*: Inlted III 
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DON'T USE KTHS if rou sell a 

"Limited Meu-ket 



it 



(Polo players in Little Rock ONLY, for instance!) 




DKL*. 




LOUISIANA .„/ 



Daytime, the Station KTHS primary (0.5MV 'M) area 
has a population of 1.002.758. More than 18°o, or over 
100.000. do not receive primary daytime service from any 
other radio station. 

KTHS interference-free daytime coverage extends to the 
0.1MV/M contour, except in the southwest quadrant — 
has a population of 3,372,433. 



DO USE KTHS if you sell 



\ ES, there might be a few people like Reginald, above, in Little 
Rock — but you certainly wouldn't use KTHS to reach them, unless 
you wanted everybody else, too! 

KTHS is Arkansas' big advertising medium. It's 50,000 
watts — CBS — is programmed for every element of the 
population in this big State. So everywhere our signal's 
heard, there are listeners — lots of listeners — buying lis- 
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Arkansas. 

Ask The Branham Co. for all the facts. It's a story of power, 
programming, coverage and results. It's a story you need to know! 



i s s i ppi 



50,000 Watts . . . CBS Radio 

Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



KTHS 

BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 



ll 



HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE 
ANNOUNCES — — - 

THE BIG 

THE GREATEST ARRAY 
OF QUALITY PICTURES 
EVER OFFERED FOR 
TELEVISION! 



I 







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fi 



3. 
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The Diamond Group 



CHANGE OF HEART 

John Carroll, Susan Hayward, Eve Arden, Gail Patrick, 
Walter Catlett, Freddie Martin & Orchestra 



BRAZIL 

Tito Guizar, Virginia Bruce, Edward Everett Horton, 
Robert Livingston, Richard Lane, Frank Puglia, 
Fortunio Bonanova, Dan Seymour 

SIS HOPKINS 

Judy Conova, Bob Crosby, Jerry Colonna, Susan Hayward 

HEADIN' FOR GOD'S COUNTRY 

William Lundigan, Virginia Dole, Horry Davenport 

SCOTLAND YARD INVESTIGATOR 

Sir C. Aubrey Smith, Eric von Stroheim, Stephanie Bachelor. 
Forrester Harvey, Doris Lloyd 

EARL CARROLL SKETCHBOOK 

Constance Moore, William Marshall, Bill Goodwin, 
Vera Vague, Edword Everett Horton, Hillary Brooke 

SLEEPYTIME GAL 

Judy Canova, Tom Brown, Harold Huber, Ruth Terry, 
Jerry Lester, Fritz Feld 



8. VILLAGE BARN DANCE 

Richard Cromwell, Dorij Doy, Either Dale, Don WlUon 

9. BIG BONANZA 

Richard Arlen, Robert Livingston, Jane Frozee, Gabby Hayes, 
Lynne Roberts, Bobby Driscoll, Monte Hale 

10. RENDEZVOUS WITH ANNIE 

Eddie Albert, Faye Marlowe, Gail Patrick, Philip Reed, 
Sir C. Aubrey Smith 

11. IN OLD MISSOURI 

Leon, Frank, Elviry & June Weaver, June Storey, 
Marjorie Gateson, Thurston Hall, Alan Ladd, 
Hall Johnson Choir 

12. MURDER IN THE MUSIC HALL 

Vera Ralston, William Marshall, Helen Walker, Nancy Kelly, 
William Gargan, Ann Rutherford, Julie Bishop, Jerome Cowan 

13. HITCH HIKE TO HAPPINESS 

Al Pearce, Dale Evans, Brad Taylor, Williom Frawley, 
Jerome Cowan, Arlene Harris, Joyce Compton 

14. SOMEONE TO REMEMBER 

Mabel Paige, Richord Crane, Charles Dingle 

15. SCATTERBRAIN 

Judy Canova, Alan Mowbroy, Eddie Foy, Jr., Isabel Jewell 




SERVICE, Inc. Home Office: 4020 Carf e 



ANY OF THE 32 HOLLYWOOD TELEVI 



HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION 



BUFFALO. NY. 
503 P.O. I Street 
CHAflOTTE, N.C 
337 Weit 4th Street 
CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 
1304 S. Wabo.h Avenu 



CINCINNATI. OHIO 
1632 Central forkwoy 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
4S0 Film Build. n, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 
413 S. Harwoed Street 



DENVEI, COLOtADO 
3145 Broadway 
DES MOINES, IOWA 
1303 H.ah Street 
DETtOIT, MICHIGAN 
610 Film E.chonee tide 



INDIANAFO It 
40i N 
KANSAS 
313 Weil 
LOS AN 
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UDIENCES 

EMAND 

HEM! 



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SPONSORS 
NEED THEM! 





GREA 




NEW* 

SALE BY HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE, Inc. 



URE PROGRAM 



l-M.LUON DOILA 
NOV*' 



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16. 



17. 



THAT BRENNAN GIRL 

Jomes Dunn, Mono Freeman, William Marshall, 
June Duprez 

CAMPUS HONEYMOON 

Lee & Lynn Wilde, Adele Mara, Richard Crone, 
Stephanie Bachelor 



18. JOAN OF OZARK 

Judy Conovo, Joe E. Brown, Jerome Cowan, 
Anne Jeffreys, Donald Curtis 

19. I'LL REACH FOR A STAR 

Frances Longford, Phil Reagan, Louise Henry, 
Dukt Ellington and Eddie Duchin Orchestras 



20. 
21. 

22. 
23. 



OH, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE 

Frank Albertson, Irene Ryan, Tom Kennedy, Roy Acuff 

SLEEPY LAGOON 

Judy Conovo, Dennis Day, Ernest Truex, Douglas Fowley, 
Will Wright, Joe Sawyer 

IN OLD SACRAMENTO 

William Elliott, Constance Moore 

CHATTERBOX 

Judy Canovo, Joe E. Brown, Rosemary Lane, 
John Hubbard, Anne Jeffreys 



24. NIGHT TRAIN TO MEMPHIS 

Roy Acuff, Allan Lane, Adele Mara, Roy Acuff and his 
Smoky Mountain Boys 

25. CALENDAR GIRL 

Jane Frazee, William Marshall, Gail Patrick, Victor McLaglen, 
Kenny Baker, Irene Rich, James Ellison 

26. PUDDIN' HEAD 

Judy Canova, Frances Lederer, Raymond Walburn, 
Chick Chandler, Paul Harvey 



A Specialty Attraction 



HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE is proud to present 
one of the world's great entertainment film subjects 
KEN MURRAY'S GREAT 

"BILL AND COO" 



fwood, California • Telephone: SUnset 3-8807 or 



i, Inc. REPRESENTATIVES! 



o'the 






NIW HAVEN, CONN. 
1 32 Meadow Street 
NIW OtliANS, IA. 
I JO S liberty Street 
NIW YOtK. N Y 
6)0 Ninth Avenue 



OKLAHOMA CITY. OKLA. 
623 Weil Grand Avenue 
OMAHA, NEMASKA 
1514 Davenport Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
248 N Clarion Street 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 
1709 Blvd. of the Alllei 
PORTLAND, OKEGON 
IB16 N. W. Kearney Street 
it LOUIS, MO. 
3320 Olive Street 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
214 Eoit First South Street 
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 
2420 Second Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
221 Golden Gate Avenue 






TAMPA, FLORIDA 
IIS S. Franklin Aven« 
WASHINGTON, DC. 
203 Eye Street, N.W. 



kMH 










KSDO is first in San Diego . . . 
and thaf's the long and short of it. 

Surveys, ratings, mail-pull . . . 

any way you look at it, KSDO tops 

every station in this rich 

billion dollar market 

May we give you the long and 

short of it . . . tell you why 

KSDO delivers the most listeners 

per dollar in San Diego? 




KSDO 



1130 KC 5000 WATTS 

Representatives 

John E. Pearson Co. — New York 

Chicago — Dallas — Minneapolis 

Daren McGavren — San Francisco 

Hugh Feltis-Associates — Seattle 

"Q" Cox & Merrill Rawson — 

Portland 

Walt Lake — Los AnRclcs 




by Bob Foreman 

How to worh with II ollytvoodites 

Directed by the same directors, written by the same writers, 
processed by the same laboratories, it is indeed anomalous 
that film for television and film for big-screen exhibition 
have so very little in common. The fact that tv is sponsored, 
intended to sell, presented with frequency, in the home and 
gratis makes the difference. These dissimilarities, when un- 
derestimated or ignored, are the cause of so much of the 
trouble encountered by advertisers who have tv programs 
and commercials produced by "Hollywood people." 

Since the transition to the new art is often a difficult one 
for the coast element, it should be reckoned with early by 
agency and sponsor, both of whom should take into account 
the new set of criteria they are asking the refugees-from-a- 
big screen to measure up to. 

Rather than over-work the already tired cliches about 
suede-shoe mentalities and purple shirt personnel, it would 
be more sensible, as well as less time-and-money consuming. 
if agency and/or advertiser were to approach the problem 
by realizing that these neophytes-to-advertising are possibly 
intelligent, probably skilled and generally unaccustomed to 
the added onus of sponsorship, the necessities of salesman- 
ship and the responsibilities of being a gratis exhibitor whose 
product is viewed in the living room by all age groups . . . 
and week after week. 

I have spent a lot of time in the past six years in sunny 
California closeted in artificially lighted studios watching 
the laborious work of translating advertising copy into film 
and I have not only been impressed but oft-times a wee bit 
uneasy to learn of the long list of screen credit- of this direc- 
tor who is shooting a car commercial and of that cutter who 
is editing a cigarette vignette. T remember that the prop man 
who w 7 as wiping out our beer glasses and taking the wrinkle- 
out of steinie labels had jusl finished up as head prop man 
on the set of my (then favorite epic — High Noon. I recall 
gelling some special effect- for a pudding vignette out of 
folks who bad created such wonderful art effects as the main 
title for Sunset Boulevard. 

All the men and women with whom I worked approached 
this new world into which the) had been jel propelled with 
a desire to do well . . . with a respeel for the task ahead. 
This mean- completely wiibout cynicism and minus the dis- 
dain I had heard about and lliu- expected, 
i Please turn to page 62) 



SPONSOR 



3ft- 



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Effective immediately, all United Television Programs, Inc. 
personnel and film properties become a part of the MCA-TV 
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of quality TV film programs anywhere. Now the MCA-TV staff 
consists of 68 salesmen who offer you 22 separate filmed TV 
programs for local or regional sponsorship. 



BmI 



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THOMAS MITCHELL 

^\MAY0R 

3 <«Vf*} OF THE 

^ TOWN 

Thomas Mitchell stars in 
39 exciting topical dra- 
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rated radio and TV show 
for many years. Already 
sold in over 60 markets. 




ROD 

CAMERON 



CITY 
DETECTIVE 



65 half-hour mystery and 
adventure films, starring 
Rod Cameron. In its third 
year of successful selling 
for sponsors. 






GUY ^> 
LOMBARD0 



AND 
HIS 



ROYAL CANADIANS 



39 sparkling half-hour 
films, featuring America's 
No. 1 musical favorite and 
a famous female guest star 
vocalist each week. 



ROCKY 
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SPACE 
RANGER 




39 films that hold adult 
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spellbound. Backed by a 
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guaranteed to give your 
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PRESTON 




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Sell your product through 
sponsorship of this out 
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(Also known as "City As- 
signment.") Pat McVey and 
Jane Nye, as a crusading 
team of newspaper re- 
porters, bring you drama 
and suspense .. .91 films. 



KEN MURRAY 




WERE 
YOU? 



Great heroes, war person- 
alities, famous events, dar- 
ing exploits, presented in 
documentary style with 
Ken Murray as your host. 
26 films available. 



GEORGE RAFT 




George Raft plays the role 
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a show for every product, 
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Now, whether you 




CHARLES BICKFORD 



LOUIS HAYWARD 



Now, whether you 
want comedy, drama 
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sure to find the 
perfect show to fit 

your needs among 
MCA-TV's 22 top-rated 
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Over 200 films in this high- 
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ICA'S NO. 1 DISTRIBUTOR OF TELEVISION FILM PROGRAMS 




America's funniest comedy 
team stars in 52 hilarious 
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Louis Hayward stars as the 
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PRIDE 

OF THE 

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JOHN RUSSELL 
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26 exciting new adventure 
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to 7-Up Bottling. 



CALL 



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$EEtt&&EElMMEEEM 



I 3 encore dramas starring f 
such famous Holly 
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Joan Bennett, Miriam Hop- 
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Melvyn Douglas stars as 
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mixing love and adven- 
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Alan Hale, Jr. and Randy 
Stuart star in 26 half-hour 
films of international mys- 
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Ralph Bellamy stars in 82 
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only MC^-TV has so many 
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CONTACT YOUK NUSIST 
MCA-TV OFFICf FOR 
AUDITION MINTS TODAY! 

NEW YORK: S98 Madison A 
Plata 9- 75 00 

BEVERLY HILLS: 9370 Santa 



ATLANTA: SIS Glenn Bldg., 

67 SO 

BOSTON: 45 Newbury St., 
COpley 7-5B30 



MCA-TV CANADA: 

nd St., W 



CHICAGO: 430 North Michigan 
Ave., DEIoware 7-1100 

CLEVELAND: 1172 Union Corn- 
tree Bldg., CHerry 1-6010 

ROANOKE: 1 16A West Kirk Ave. 
ROanoke 3-4344 

NEW ORLEANS: 42 Allard Blvd., 
GAIvei 4410 

CINCINNATI: 3790 Gardner Ave., 
SYcomore 9149 

DALLAS: 2102 No. Akard St., 
PRospect 7536 

DETROIT: 837 Book Tower, 
WOodward 2-2604 

MCA-TV FRANCE: 
49 bis Ave., Hoihe, 



SAN FRANCISCO: 10S Mont- 
gomery St., EXbrook 2-8922 

SEATTLE: 203 White Building, 
Mutual 4S67 

SALT LAKE CITY: 212 Sea 
Bldg., 3-4657 

MINNEAPOLIS: 1048 Northwest- 
ern Bank Bldg., Lincoln 7863 

PITTSBURGH: 550 Grant St., 
Suite 146, GRant 1-9995 

PHILADELPHIA: Bellevue-St ' 
" d * Walnut 
ir 5-9462 

ST. LOUIS: 1 700 Liggett Dri 
WOodland 2-3683 

MCA-TV ENGLAND: 
139 Piccadily 




like a foot print 
on the sands of 
time WHLM cov- 
ers a quality mar- 
ket in Pennsylvania just as a Magee Carpet 
covers a quality market throughout the 
United States. 

This rich industrial and agricultural market 
which produced a combined annual income 



of $2,090,404,000 in 1954 can only be 
reached adequately by WHLM RADIO 
with 500 Watts at 550 Kc. 

A new transmitter .... a new antenna .... 
a new and beautiful studio .... and now a 
new Move to 550 Kc. which simply 
means a brand new coverage pattern to 
reach the greatest number of potential pur- 
chasers for your client's products in this in- 
creasingly productive Pennsylvania market. 



TT7T 



WAZL WHLM 



Hazleton, Pa. NBC-MBS Bloomsburg, Pa. Biddeford-Saco, Me. MBS- Yankee 

(All Stations Represented by Paul H. Raymer Company) 



Boston, Mass. ABC 




Decision-makers at 
the point-of-sale are . . 

Sunshine Biscuits, Inc. and 

the nwn from Cunningham & Walsh 

are Sold on Spot as 

a basic advertising medium! 

National Spot advertising can help move your merchandise of! 
grocery store shelves — just as it does for Sunshine Biscuits. 

Spot, with its total flexibility, permits Sunshine to choose its 
markets to meet specific sales problems. After careful study and 
analysis, Sunshine's agency, Cunningham & Walsh, makes its 
recommendations. 

HOW MUCH SPOT?The Spot recommendations may range from 
a saturation schedule to just one commercial announcement in a 
market, depending on Sunshine's sales objectives. Sunshine's Spot 
advertising, on both Radio and Television, is coordinated with 
its advertising in other media to do a complete pre-selling job. 

HOW TO GET ADDED POWER? The stations represented by 
NBC Spot Sales follow through with merchandising support — 
like highly successful Radio Chain Lightning — that moves mer- 
chandise off grocers' shelves faster than any other media mer- 
chandising plan. (Ask the successful advertisers who are using 
it over and over.) 

With Spot, you too can move into a market quickly — any market 
in which youi sale- manager needs strong support — and you can 
do it within a matter of days, or even hours. 

HOW TO PUT SPOT TO WORK? Let your advertising agency, 
or an NBC Spot Salesman show you how Spot can fit into J our 
selling plans. They'll tell you how Spot can sell for you in II 
major markets that account for 45' ! of the nation's food sales. 

Business executives are Sold on Spol be< ause more merchandise 
i- Sold on Spot. . . 




and some Spots are better than others! I IXIiCl S IM >T SALE S 




" fi I U llei Plaza, New York 20, A'. Y. 
Chicago Detroit Cleveland Washington 

an F':r . Los Angeles Charlotte* Atlanta* Dallas* 

*Bitmar I. mi ranee Associates 




Norman Smith Advertising Manager, Newman McEvoy l/rc Prfsii/rai i/m/ George Dietrich A ational Manager, Joseph Gavin Time Buyer 

Sunshine Biscuits, Inc. Media Ductal, Cunningham and Walsh Radio, NBC Spot Sales Cunningham and Walsh 

Candid photo by Eliott Eruitt. Taken at Grand Union, New York City. 



representing TELEVISION STATIONS: 



WRGB Schenectady- 
Albany-Troy 



WNBQ Chicago WNBK (Iceland 

KRCA Los Angeles KPTV . Portland, Ore. 

KONA-TV Honolulu, Hawaii KSD-TV St. Louis WAVE-TV Louisville 

WRCA-TV New York WRC-TV Washington, D.C. 



representing RADIO STATIONS: 

WAVE Louisville WMAQ Chicago WRC Washington, D. C. 

KCU Honolulu, Hawaii KNBC Sun Francisco WTAM Cleveland 

WRCA New York KSD St. Louis 



© 1954 BY NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. INC. 



t 



210,000 watts 

(maximum radiated power) 



covers 



BIGGEST 
MARKET 

in Southern 
New England 




LOOK 

at the 

FACTS! 



A. R. B. Report (Nov. 1954) gives 

WKNB-TV 70% 
UHF Saturation 

in the Hartford-New Britain Market 

OVER 240,000 
Homes Delivered* 

FIRST TV station in Hartford County 
FIRST in program popularity 
FIRST in studio and transmitter facilities 
FIRST in local advertising success stories 

'December, 1954 




WKNB-TV 

7422 New Britain Avenue 

West Hartford, Conn. 



Represented by The BOLLING Company 




II I II I Ml \ 



SPONSOR invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 



YEAR-END REVIEWS 

^ <>ur December 13th issue was par- 
ticularly interesting. \our year-end 
reviews of the top agencies are always 
newsworthy. \nd your constant efforts 

to help advertising to evolve into a 
more nearl) professional activity, al- 
vvavs receive a heartv (hough silent 
word of thanks from me. In particular 
I refer to your article which tells about 
the errors in tv selling, the story on 
how local ad men evaluate [or fail to 
evaluate] media, and the piece on what 
timebuvers want in trade advertising. 

Roy C. Portkols 

Mjir. of Sales for Participating 

Programs 
SBC, Neu York 



TOP COMMERCIALS 

In your issue of December 27, 1954 
| on page 38], you featured a very 
interesting article headlined "I like 
this tv commercial because . . .". One 
of the four tv commercials pictured 
in this article was for E-Z Pop pop- 
torn. The agency listed for this ac- 
count was Cunningham & Walsh. 

For your information and correc- 
tion, our agenc) handle- all the nation- 
al and Midwest advertising for E-Z 
Pop popcorn, and it was our agency 
that created the cartoon spot referred 
to on this page. Cunningham & 
\\ alsh places the advertising for the 
Eastern franchisee! manufacturer of 
K-Z Pop popcorn, but had nothing 
whatsoever to do with the prepara- 
tion of tlii- spot. We are naturally 
veiv proud of the spot and hate to see 
someone else gel credit for it. 

\\ e arc currently running the car- 
toon for our account all through the 
Midwest and recently used it during 
a nationwide telecast of the Sugar 
Bowl Football Game. 

I here isn't a daj goes l>\ thai we 
don t receive fan mail from tv listen- 
ers who not onl) tell us how wonder- 
ful this spol is bul a-k u> when thej 
i n see it again, and tell us that foi 
the hi-t lime ihe\ enioA watching a 



commercial. One junior high school 
-Indent in I )e Kalb. Illinois wrote that 
his entire school was "real gone" 
about it and requested a copy. We 
sen! him a print. 

While we at the agenc ) are natural- 
ly elated about this -pot. we are even 
happier with the tremendous increase 
in business E-Z Pop popcorn has en- 
joyed since we first put this spot on 
the air. 

Our thanks to Y \ I!'- W illiam Coli- 
han. Jr. for his kind ^vords. 

Felix Hower 

Vice President 

W. B. Doner and Co. 

Detroit 



• Cunningham & Walsh also noticed the error. 
They called to not if 5 SPONSOR, adding thai the> 
agreed it wus a terrific commercial ami wished 

thai the) had dune it. 



INSURANCE SPONSORS 

In your excellent publication en- 
titled "All-Media Evaluation Study" 
you give some comments about the ef- 
fectiveness of television advertising as 
reported bv several important Ameri- 
can insurance companies. I quoted 
these statements recentlv to one of our 
clients, the Northern Assurance Co. 

Ltd. 

As you doubtless know, commercial 
television will be introduced into Great 
Britain next September or October 
and a great deal of interest is being 
shown in the sales effectiveness of the 
medium in the- United States. . . I do 
not know whether the American com- 
panies concerned would be prepared to 
divulge information to a British com- 
pany in the saint- field of business, but 
if lhe\ would do so. I know our client 
would be verj pleased and interested. 

Might I ask for your help in this 
matter? I shall be visiting the I nited 

State- to studv certain aspects of tele- 
vision merchandising in March, and I 
would tie pleased to call on the com- 
panies concerned if this was thought 
desirable. 

G. K. MOI NTFORl 

Director 

Wathei & < rowther I. id. 

London. England 

• Hi,-, ;,r. some ,.( ihc SPONSOR articlca on 
in-iii .hi, .' rompanj advertising which muy pro- 
vide background for potential British air adver- 

liscrs: IT VI 05 1954, page .".:> (Metr Iltan) ; 

I December 1952. page 30 (Mutual of Omaha)) 
19 Ma) l'>.">2. page 22 (Metropolitan) | 1 9 >••- 
vember 1951, page 54 (Mutual ol Columbus); 
12 Fcbruar] I *>."» I . page 36 (Prudential). 

I Please mm to page 1 25 I 



SPONSOR 



not** 



c**- u 



*" 1 rn * cor 



T\N* E 






o0 *|fcn*" 

D\n com* 

O ^ vom ***** 



G2 b- «"-"* 

, — A Castas 

LJ l mV Vines 

r-n study ing 

n Estate PV»* 

V— — 1 • ,r agent 

r^\ Booing A * 

r-n Ban^ 
r-n Boss 









tout <#Y tt|| 

L4^.':- ••■■•to' -.*»tf 



^t^r^ »— — - 

< — I Get w- nenoo «" ■ 

r\ * hat ' a* «• s6 " " « i. * oaIS £or 

a/-:::in -^ e) 

Wlite c^ tt "' ess M*-^ , , 



p. ■'., '•# 
£?• •■ •:, 



a 



24 JANUARY 1955 



19 



Only 




STATIONS 

are powerful 
enough and 
popular enough to 
register audiences 
in radio survey 
ratings of both 
Los Angeles 
and San Diego 

Of these top 
four, KBIG is 

• the only 
independent 

• the least 
expensive 

• the lowest cost 
per thousand 
families 






JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: HOIIywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc. Inc. 




Charles V Camvbvll. Mat Manas. John & 

Adams, Bloomfield Hills, Mich., recently helped 
complete buying radio-tv for the huge campaign 
introducing the 1955 line of two auto firms: Pontiac 
and Cadillac. Key lessons, he feels, are these: 
"Automotive advertisers in the future must lean more 
toward consistency than toward saturation. They 
are finding it extremely difficult to clear suitable 
time periods lor short-term tV saturation Inns: 
there are too mam long-term advertisers who have 
franchises on prime time. Large tv network shows 
add prestige. Hut long-term spot schedules are 
equal I) important. Spot, well-placed, can be of great 
service to auto firms." Foi Pontiai alone, Chuck 
bought schedules on 1.200 radio and over 300 tv 
stations throughout the country. He bought another 
150 radio stations for the 1955 Cadillac. 



Mrs. IBvttfi Vs'l.voii >/mi/m'<-ii. Albert Frank- 
Guenther Law, Veu York, feels that the day will 

come soon when there'll be main regional tv net- 
works fust as there are multitudes of regional radio 
networks. "With new tv markets opening up all 
the time, lewer anil fewer advertisers can afford 
to ignore the medium completely" says Betty. 
"However, tv's still too expensive for clients with 
budgets under $500,000 '/ year. One answer to the 
budget problem are shows like Today, which male 
network bins economically feasible tor small clients. 

Another answer is spot tV, of course. But neither 
oi thes, two media is tailor-made lor the large 
number of regional advertisers, whose distribution 
covers only one section oi the country. When these 
advertisers can get a package Inn on tv 

Stations in the same area, they'll bin ti .' 



Joflll Stark, H illiuin II. If einlraub. \ew York, 

feels that pinpointing the audience is the key to 

successful and economic time Inning. "Talc three 
categories of accounts I bin lor at this agencx." 
Joan explains. "That is. automotive, tobacco and 
cosmetics. In each instance, the client is appealing 
to a somewhat different part of the mass audienci 
with cars. xou want lo appeal to a mixed adult 
audience, though predominantly to men: with <igars, 

of course, it's only men xou want to reach; cosmetics 

are bought bx women. In buying time, it's impor- 
tant, therefore, to get, not necessarily the highest- 
rated time, but the time thai has the greatest number 

nl potential customers lor xour client's product. 

I he Ward MBS study of listening habits in the 
I ,S. has helped buyers pinpoint the radio 
audience. In li . a buxer still relies on main sources. 



zU 



SPONSOR 



IT'S A LAND&IDE o 





Any way you look at it, 
weekly quarter-hour 
firsts, shares of audience 
or program rankings . . . 
ifs WKBN-TV for best- 
rated adjacencies'. 



WKBN-TV 

PROGRAM RANKINGS 

5 of the first 6 
10 of the first 13 
30 of the first 38 






PROGRAM 


RATING 


STATION 


1. 


Toast of the Town 


38 


WKBN-TV 


2. 


Jackie Gleason Show 


34 


WKBN-TV 


3. 


1 Love Lucy 


31 


WKBN-TV 


4. 


Milton Berle 


30 


Station B 


5. 


Beat the Clock 


29 


WKBN-TV 


6. 


I've Got a Secret 


28 


WKBN-TV 


7. 


Roy Rogers 


26 


Station B 


8. 


Racket Squad 


26 


WKBN-TV 


9. 


Big Story 


26 


Station B 


10. 


December Bride 


25 


WKBN-TV 


1 1. 


Arthur Godfrey and Friends 


25 


WKBN-TV 


12. 


Two for the Money 


25 


WKBN-TV 


13. 


Browns Pro Football 


25 


WKBN-TV 


14. 


Meet Millie 


24 


WKBN-TV 


15. 


Four-Star Playhouse 


24 


WKBN-TV 


16. 


You Bet Your Life 


24 


Station B 


17. 


Dollar a Second 


24 


WKBN-TV 


18 


Topper 


24 


WKBN-TV 


19 


Badge 714 


23 


' Station B 


20. 


Studio 57 


23 


WKBN-TV 


21. 


Justice 


23 


Station B 


22. 


Dangerous Assignment 


23 


WKBN-TV 


23. 


Dragnet 


23 


Station B 


24 


Our Miss Brooks 


23 


WKBN-TV 


25 


Hit Parade 


23 


Station B 


26 


Polka Party 


23 


WKBN-TV 


27 


Honestly Celeste 


22 


WKBN-TV 


28 


Elgin TV Hour 


22 


WKBN-TV 


29. 


Strike It Rich (eve.) 


22 


WKBN-TV 


30 


Masquerade Party 


22 


WKBN-TV 


31 


What's My Line 


21 


WKBN-TV 


32. 


Perry Como Show 


21 


WKBN-TV 


33 


Edward Arnold Show 


21 


WKBN-TV 


34. 


Rumpus Room 


21 


WKBN-TV 


35. 


NCAA Scoreboard 


21 


WKBN-TV 


36 


Best of Broadway 


20 


WKBN-TV 


37. 


Mark Saber 


20 


WKBN-TV 


38 


Hopalong Cassidy 


20 


WKBN-TV 



WEEKLY 

QUARTER-HOUR 

FIRSTS 

WKBN-TV 363 

Station B 58 

Ties 30 



It's WKBN-TV, highest by far 
in the 32nd U. S. market . . . Serving 
745,000 homes equipped to receive 
Channel 27 . . . Nearly a half million 
viewers . . . Plus CBS, ABC, Dumont 
. . . New 760,000 Wafts power . . . 
and network color programs. 

Source for all survey data: Hooperatings, Oct. 1954. 
Complete Hooperating Report available on request. 




i WKBN-TV 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 

CHANNELS 



Represented Nationally by 

PAUL H. RAYMER CO. 




We'll trade 2 dollars of ours 
for every 1 dollar of yours 



This is something only WLW's Radio two-for-on 
plan offers. Here's a proved merchandise 
and promotion program of such span and fore; 
that it guarantees you an additional full dot 
lar's worth of top-notch product promotion fo 




'ery advertising dollar you spend on WLW Radio. 

We have a consulting team ready to talk to 

u, ready to build your own 2-for-l package. 

y us out and you'll see that one equals two 

WLW Radio. 



a distinguished member of the 

CROSLEY GROUP 

Exclusive Sales Offices: 

New York, Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus, Atlanta, Chicago, Miami 







1 -^ 

WLW 
WLW-A 
WLW C 
WLW D 
WLW-T 


Radio 

Atlanta 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Cincinnati 




Month after month after month 



THE BOX SCORE* 


Month 


Top 15 Once- 
A-Week Shows 


Top 10 Multi- 
Weekly Shows 


April '54 
May '54 
June '54 
July '54 
Aug. '54 
Sept. '54 


7 out of 15 

8 out of 15 
9* of 15 

12ou$of 15 
11 out of 15 
11 out of 15 


4 out of 10 
6 out of 10 
6 out of 10 
/ out of 10 
'7 out of 10 
6 out of 10 


Total 6 Mos. 


58 out of 90 


36 out of 60 



It takes more than coverage to get your television message across. 
It takes viewers, too. In the great Atlanta market, Telepulse tells 
the story. 

For 6 consecutive months WAGA-TV led by nearly 2 to 1 the 
other two \tlanta stations combined — in top weekly shows and in 
top multi-weekly shows. 

Here is proof aplent\ that \onr lele\ision dollar gets more 
viewers da) in and day out, month in and month out, when you use 
WAGA-TV— Channel 5 — CBS-TV in Atlanta. Get the full story 
from our representatives. 



'Based on The Atlanta Telepulse, April-September, 19S4 




Represented Nationally by 
the KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 




waoa-tv 







CBS-TV in Atlanta 



hit; i\rtit rtVLn\. I, int. 

Tom Horker, V.P. and Nat'l Sales Director, 118 E. 57th St., New York 22 • Bob Wood, Midwest National Sales Manager, 230 N Michigan Ave., Chicago 



24 



SPONSOR 



New and renew 



SPIE8I1 



24 JANUARY 1955 



1. New on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



B.iyuk Cigars, Phila 

Bissell iCarpct Sweeperl. Grand Rapids 

R. T. French, Rochester 

Pet Milk. St Louis 

CBS-Columbia, NY 

Sheaffer Pen Co (Fincline Div). Ft. 

Madison, la 
Studebaker-Packard Corp. Det 
Toni, Chi 
Plymouth, Det 

S. C. Johnson 6 Son, Racine. Wis 

Rcvlon Products, NY 



D'Arcy, NY 

N. W. Ayer, NY 

JWT. NY 

Gardner. St Louis 

Ted Bates, NY 
Russell Seeds. Chi 

Ruthrautf b Ryan. NY 
Weiss & Celler, Chi 
N. W. Ayer, Phila 

Necdham, Louis & Brorby, 

Chi 
William H. Wcintraub, NY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



ABC TV 

NBC TV 47 
NBC TV 54 
NBC TV 44 

CBS TV 75 

CBS TV 46 
ABC TV 80 

ABC TV 87 
NBC TV 109 
NBC TV 

CBS TV 75 

CBS TV 55 



Walter Winchell; alt Sun 9-9:15 pm; Feb 6; 52 

wks 
Home; M-F 11 am-noon; |an 3; 52 wks 
Today; M-F 7- 9am; Jan 3; 52 wks 
The World of Mr Sweeney; W 4:30-4:45 pm; |an 

5; 26 wks 
The New Red Skelton Show; alt T 9:30-10 pm; 

Jan 4; 32 wks 
Life With Father; T 8-8:30 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 
Who Said That?; W 9:30-10 pm; Feb 2; 52 wks 

Tv Reader's Digest; M 8-8:30 pm ; Jan 17; 52 wks 
So This is Hollywood; Sat 8:30-9 pm; Jan 1; 
Plymouth News Caravan; W 7:45-8 pm; Jan 5: 

3 out of 4 M; Jan 17; 52 wks 
The New Red Skelton Show; alt T 9:30-10 pm; 

Jan 4; 32 wks 
Danger; alt T 10-10:30 pm; Feb 8; 52 wks 




2. Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Lever Bros. NY 


McCann-Erickson. NY 


CBS TV 58 


Arthur Godfrey; M-W 11-11:15 am; Jan 3; 52 wks 


Philip Morris, NY 


Biow, NY 


CBS TV 149 


L Love Lucy; alt T 9-9:30 pm; Jan 3; 104 wks 


Procter 6 Camble, Cinn 


Biow, NY 


CBS TV 149 


1 Love Lucy; alt T 9-9:30 pm; Jan 3; 104 wks 


Procter & Camble, Cinn 


Compton, NY 


CBS TV 104 


Road of Life; M-F 1:15-1:30 pm; |an 3; 26 wks 




3. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 




Rodney Albright 


DCSS, NY 


Biow-Beirn-Toigo, NY, Tv film prdcr 




N. Art Astor 


Napier Co, sis rep 


Headley-Reed, LA, acct exec 




Robert F. Bender 


WKRC-TV, Cinn, gen mgr 


Haehnle, Cin, vp in chg of radio-tv 




Vincent R. Bliss 


Earle Ludgin, Chi, exec vp 


Same, pres 




Andrew C. Boyd, Jr 


Erwin, Wasey, LA, copy chief 


Same, vp 




Leroy B. Block 


Grey. NY, acct supvr 


Same, vp 




Lester Blumenthal 


William H. Weintraub. NY. bus mgr. r-tv dept 


Same, also vp 




John D. Burke 


Erwin, Wasey, NY, chg of copy dept 


Same, also vp 




Thomas C. Butcher 


Lennen & Newell. NY, sr vp & acct supvr 


Same, exec vp 




Aldis P. Butler 


Y&R, vp, NY 


Same, also chg Det office; acct supvr 




Raymond P. Calt 


Y&R, NY, copywriter 


Calkins & Holden, NY, dir of copy 




Thomas S. Cadden 


Krupnick & Assoc, St Louis, acct serv stf 


Same, r-tv dir 




Bobb Chaney 


BBDO, Minn, vp 


Same, also mgr of Minn office 




Philip S. Church Jr 


WLW-D, Dayton, sis exec 


Bridges-Sharp & Assoc. Dayton, food mdsg dri, a 

exec 
Rutledgc & Lilienfeld, Chi, r-tv hd 


cct 


Anne Coyle 


Tatham-Laird, Chi 




George Croll 


Erwin, Wasey, NY, chg of art dept 


Same, also vp 




Barton A. Cummings 


Compton, NY, dir 


Same, pres 




Richard R. Curtis 


Columbus Dispatch, adv stf 


Kight, Col, acct exec 




Jane Daly 


Earle Ludgin, Chi, r-tv dir 


Same, also vp 




Clifford Dillon 


SSCB. vp. copy chief 


Compton, NY, vp & creative exec 




John E. Doblc 


Biow Co, NY 


Benton & Bowles, NY, assoc acct exec 




Geofrey C. Doyle 


Scandinavian Airlines, adv & sis prom mgr 


Crcy, NY, acct exec 




Jerome Feniger 


CBS. sis exec 


Cunningham & Walsh, NY, media dir 




Gordon D. Fisher 


Brady. Appleton, Wis. exec art dir 


Same, vp 




C. James Fleming Jr. 


Compton, NY, vp, bd member 


Same, sr vp 




Mildred Fulton 


Biow Co, timebuyer 


McCann-Erickson. NY, head timebuyer. Bulova 




Holt J. Cewinner Jr 


WSB, Atlanta, sis rep 


Day, Haris. Mower & Wcinstein, Atlanta, chg 
bdest media 


of 


Jane Harrington 


Rome Daily Amer, adv stf 


Mike Fadell, Minn, acct exec 




Bob Hayward 


Foote, Cone & Belding, Hollywood, r-tv supvr 


Brisacher, Wheeler & Staff, SF, r-tv supvr 




Richard H. Hobbs 


Irwin Vladimir, Chi, vp and mgr 


Same, exec vp 




Robert D. Holbrook 


Compton, NY, pros 


Same, bd chmn 




Richard Holland 


Hollis Prod. NY, asst exec prdcr 


Biow- Beirn-Toigo, NY, tv prog supvr 




Ralph R. Hotchkiss 


Maxon. Detr, vp, acct exec 


Compton, NY, vp 




Donald Joscphson 


Hecht Co, Wash 


Blaine-Thompson, NY, asst acct exec 




Robert C. Kelly 


Y&R, NY 


Biow-Bcirnc-Toigo, NY, tv prog supvr 






*i* 





Clifford 
f , ' Dillon (3) 




J£-v„ Willmarth (3', 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Radio Networks, National Broadcast Sales 
Executives, New Agency Appointments, New Firms, New Offices, Changes of Address 




24 JANUARY 1955 



25 



24 JANUARY 1955 



.Y*>ir and renew 



Marion E. 
Stringer (4) 



Thomas C. 
Butcher i3> 





David L. 
Rand (3) 




3. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes (cont'd) 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION NEW AFFILIATION 



|ohn Kicly 

Alan D. Lehmann 

Alice Liddcll 

Russell Loftus 

Earlc Ludgin 

R. C. Pete Maddux 

John R. Markey 

J. Norman McKenzie 

Michael M. Minchin |r. 

Arthur V. Mountrcy 

John H. O'Toole Jr. 

Elmer A. Otte 

Frederick N. Polangin 

Lawson Paynter 

John H. Pinto 
David L. Rand 
Victor M. Ratner 
Steve Richards 
Charles A. Richardson 
C. Bruce Richardson 
Michael Riese 
Evelyn Ringrose 
Craig Spitz 

F. Winslow Stetson |r 
John K Strubing )r. 
Samuel M. Sutter 
Adolph |. Toigo 
Hub Terry 

Kenneth H. Thompson 
Fred C. Walker 
Don Walsh 
Charles B. Wild 
|ohn H. Willmarth 
Robert D. Work |r. 
William K. Ziegfeld 
John L. Zimmer 
Bernard Zipp 



Brooke. Smith, French & Dorrance. NY, sr art dir 

BBDO, Buffalo, acct exec 

Ingalls-Miniter, Bost, media dir 

Y&R, Montreal 

Earle Ludgin, Chi, hd 

WOR, WOR-TV, NY, vp 

NBC, SF. chg of mdsg 

James Thomas Chirurg, Bost, vp in chg of mdsg 

Bwy Dept Stores, LA, asst mdsg mgr 

Compton NY, Amer Can Co acct exec 

Cen Elcc, Louisville, gen sis mgr 

Brady, Appleton, Wis, acct exec 

Fuller & Smith & Ross, NY, acct supvr 

Ewell & Thurber, White Plains, r-tv prod 

Cecil & Presbroy, NY, tv copy hd 

Crey. NY, acct supvr 

McCann-Erickson, NY, copy hd 

Kudner, Flint, Mich, resident rep 

Kelly, Nason, NY, acct exec 

Ingersoll-Rand Co, adv accts supvr 

E. T. Howard, NY 

Irwin Vladimir, Chi, exec asst 

JvVT, Mex, acct exec 

Bryan Houston, NY, vp and acct supvr 

Compton, NY, exec vp 

Biow Co, NY, vp chg creative depts 

Lennen & Newell, NY, exec vp & gen mgr 

WIS & WIS-TV, Columbia, SC, sis rep 

Erwin, Wasey, NY 

Sears, Greenville, SC, adv & sis prom mgr 

Steve Hanagan, NY, acct exec 

Gardner Displays, Pittsburgh,, ad mgr 

Earle Ludgin, Chi, vp & exec art dir 

Y&R, NY, assoc copy dir 

Leo Burnett, Chi, vp & creative dir 

Compton, NY, sr prod of tv commercials 

Paramount Steel Co, Cleve, pres 



Same, also vp 

Same, also vp 

Same, also vp 

James Thomas Chirurg, Bost. acct mgr 

Same, bd chmn 

C L. Miller, vp & dir of r-tv 

Roy S. Durstine, SF, mdsg mgr 

Same. Boston, vp and gen mgr 

Erwin, Wasey & Co, LA. .Is prom stf 

Same, also vp 

McCann-Erickson, NY mktg dept mgr 

Same, vp 

Ted Bates, NY, acct exec 

CamDbcll-Ewald, Dot, bus mgr, r-tv dept & creative 

writer 
Crant, NY, vp, copy chief 
Same, also vp 
Same, vp 

Same, west coast rep 
McCann-Erickson, LA, acct exec 
Johr, Mather Lupton Co, NY, asst acct exec 
Emil Mogul, NY, copy chief 
Same, vp 

Irwin Vladimir, NY, vp 

Necdham, Loui> & Brorby. Chi vp and acct exec 
Same, v chmn of bd 

McCann-Erickson, NY, assoc creative dir 
Same, pres 

Tom Daislcy, Col, SC, acct exec 
Same, vp in chg ind adv 
Henderson, Greenville, SC, acct exec 
Phil Dean Assoc, NY, acct exec 
Dubin & Fcldman. Pittsburgh, acct exec 
Same, exec vp & gen creative dir 
Same, also vp 
Lennen & Newell, NY, vp 
Same, mgr of comml tv prod 
Bernard B. Schnitzer, SF, exec stf 



Arhtur V. 
Mountrey (3) 




Leroy B. 
Block 13) 




Thomas 
Santacrocc (4 




4. Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 




NEW AFFILIATION 


Hcniy C. Bainbridge 


Wendell P. Colton 




P. 0. Moore, NY, adv & sis prom mgr 


Arthur R. Cannon 


Oliver B. Cannon & Sons, pres, Phila 




Same, also Valspar Corp, Adrmorc, Pa, bd chmn 


Spencer Brown III 


Borden Co, NY, adv dept 




Same, adv mgr of chem div 


Edward J. DeCray 


CBS, st relations dir 




Vitapix, NV dir of st relations 


C. C. Crace 


Colgate-Pal, Toronto, exec vp & gen 


mgr 


Same, pres 


H. William Koch Jr. 


P. Ballantine & Sons, Newark, asst to 


vp 


Same, gen mdsg mgr 


Frederick H. Heintz 


Sylvania Elec Prod, NY, Chi sis mrg 




Same, midw rcgl sis mgr 


Michael Hitzig 


Abbott Kimball, NY 




Innocenti Corp. Lambrctta Div, adv & pr mgr 


Thomas Santacrocc 


Biow Co, vp in chg of mdsg 




Ruppert Brewery, NY, vp & dir of sis 


Marion E. Stringer 


Selchow & Rightcr. NY 




Same, adv & sis prom mgr 


Frank T. Tucker 


B. F. Goodrich, Akron, adv dir 




Same, asst to the pres 



5. Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



CKX-TV, Brandon, Manitoba, rep by All-Canada TV 
KBAK-TV and radio, Bakersfield, Cal, new nat'l rep Weed 
KENT, Shrcveport, La, changes nat'l rep from Walker to John 

E. Pearson 
KOOL-TV, Phoncix, Ariz, becomes CBS affil 
KREM-TV, Spokane, becomes ABC affil 
KTAC, Tacoma, Wash, new nat'l rep Cill Pcma 
KXLF-TV, Butte, Mont, becomes ABC affil 
WATE-TV, Knoxville, Tenn, on max power of 100,000 watts 



WEBB, Bait, now under construction 

WCLO, Jancsville, Wis, new nat'l rep, Everett-McKinncy, NY 

WCRB. Bost, begins eve bdestg 

WCAR, CIcvc, renews affil with CBS 

WCEZ, Bcloit, Wis new nat'l rep, Evcrett-McKinney, NY 

WJBF. Augusta, Ca, changes call letters to WBIA 

WSAU-TV, Wassau. Wis, becomes ABC affil 

WTVN-TV. Columbus, O. becomes ABC affil 

WXEL-TV. Cleve, becomes CBS affil Mar 1 



26 



SPONSOR 




Buy XIaJ 
and get Iowa's 
METROPOLITAN AREAS, 

PLUS the 
Remainder of Iowa! 

FOOD SALES PERCENTAGES 



4.9% Cedar Rapid; ■ 

4.5% Tri-Ci ties - 

11.3% Des Moines 

3.1% Dubuque • 

4.6% Sioux City 

4.4% Waterloo • 

32.8% TOTAL METRO. AREAS 

67. 2% REMAINDER OF STATE 
100.0% 



(1954 Consumer Mm 



Iowa has six Metropolitan Areas which, all 
combined, do 32.8% of the State's Food Sales, 
as shown above. 

Quite a number of radio stations can give you 
high Hoopers etc., in ONE Metropolitan Area. 
WHO gives you high coverage in virtually 
ALL the State's Metropolitan Areas, plus prac- 
tically all the REMAINDER of Iowa, too! 



At 11 a. m v WHO gives you 
63,472 Actual Listening Homes 




MINNESOTA 



S.A.M. DAYTIME 
V^ STATION 

AUDIENCE AREA 






lOril 



JHBBE 
IQSdBS BFiu 

THHHQHBSqv 




NEBRASKA 



IB 



for only $47.50 



laiiP d ' 



(13.4 LISTENING HOMES per PENNY!) 



MISSOURI 






According to the authoritative 1954 Iowa Radio- 
Television Audience Survey, 63,472 homes all over 
Iowa are actually tuned to WHO at 11 a.m., every aver- 
age weekday. Figuring time costs at our 1 -minute, 
26-time rate, WHO gives you 13.4 actual listening 
homes, per penny! 

That's the result of ALL-STATE programming, ALL- 
STAT1: Public Service, ALL-STATE thinking, here at 
WHO. Ask Free & Peters for all details! 



FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



BUY ALL of IOWA- 
JPtus "Iowa Plus"-with 




Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watte 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A.'Loyet, Resident Manager 



24 JANUARY 1955 



27 




One of the most penetrating analogies of the 
relative merits of radio and television that we've 
seen came recently from Mr. George Abrams, 
Vice President in charge of advertising for the Block 
Drug Company. Mr. Abrams buys both network 
radio (Mutual only) and television. He speaks from 
the ideal vantage point of a rising sales curve. 

Radio, he says, is like a bamboo rake; television, 
a metal rake; they resemble each other but perform 
different tasks. For example, the close-set tines of 
a bamboo rake pull in things that slip easily through 



the gap-toothed metal rake. Then, Mr. Abrams set 
down the advantages of Mutual's bamboo rake: 

"When you reach an American family for 1 20 
of a cent why not tell every advertiser in America 
about it. Even a government postcard today costs 
you 2c, but that's unaddressed and undistributed. 
Why, for that 2c alone, radio can bring a message 
into 40 homes. But this low cost leads to another 
advantage — repetition. If my commercial message 
is only costing me 50< l -per- 1000 each day that it goes 
on the air, then five messages a week are costing 



KES IT IN 



t \ie 



do 



v# 



40 



,e 



av 



^ 




al ^ 



only $2.50. //ovv inexpensive can you get? 
I tow cam yowr advertising cost become?" 
Vlr. Abrams' analogy of the bamboo rake is 
.icularly apt for Mutual. Because Mutual's model 
even more teeth than the other network rakes 
572 of them in the form of affiliated stations — 
ost twice as many as any other network. They 
ep farther and finer than the other networks can. 
\ctually. Mutual has many rakes; there's one 
:ly balanced for the grip of every advertiser, 
eyou for instance. Can we help you rake it in too? 



The PLUS rake 
reaches every 
corner of America 




MUTUAL 
Broadcasting 
System . . . 
1440 Broadway 
New York 18 





SELLING IN 

MONTREAL? 

That's our 

business. 




YOUR PRODUCT 

advertised on 

CFCF means more 

business for you! 




MONTREAL 



IN li.S -WEED 
IN CANADA-ALL CANADA 




Idpisf 



William fw. ftfennen, Jr. 

V.p. in charge of sales and advertising 
The Mennen Co., Morristown, N. J. 

"The first gu) who used our Skin Bracer probahh slinked around 
looking guilh and feeling like a siss\ ."' Hill Mennen. Jr.. v.p. in 
charge of sales and advertising, told sponsor. 

"If he did, then it was because of the lack of advertising. Today. 
most men use skin bracers and other men's cosmetics because ad- 
vertising has taught them that it's not unmanK and that the ladies 
like them to." 

In 1954 Vlennen used heavy earh -morning spot radio schedules 
on 100 to 125 radio stations to tell men at shaving time about 
"Mermen's he-man aroma " and other appeals ol the Mennen men - 
line. Adds the announcer, "gals really go for it." 

"'And that's a pretty good reason for any man to buy something. 
Now. I don't like blue suits," said Bill Mennen. who wore a na\ \ 
pin-stripe. "Bui my wife likes them. So. I wear 'em . . . occasionally." 

Bill Mennen, Jr., is a third-generation Mennen in tire business. 
His grandfather, Gerhard Mennen. who founded the company in 
1879, sold his first product, a corn killer, with personal advertising. 
He hired a wagon and a singer and went on tour. Between the 
singer's songs, Mennen told his audience to go to their neighborhood 
druggist and ask for Mennen's Corn Killer. 

Seventy-five years later. Bill Mennen completed the circle . . . 
almost. In 1954. he began appearing in his own t\ show : American 
Business Outlook, a live half-hour program the firm sponsors occa- 
sionally as part of a p.r. effort. It features industrial and business 
leaders from the area where the show is telecast. Mennen acts as 
moderator during their discussions of current business problems. 

About SI million of Mennen's $5 million over-all budget in 1954 
wcnl into spot radio and t\. Three agencies handle the Mennen 
account: K&E, McCann-Erickson and Grey. 

Mennen does a lot of traveling abroad: visits to the Italian Alps 
where there are the talc mines that furnish raw material for Mennen 

products; to the I . S. Anm bases in North Africa which Mennen 

supplies: lo Venezuela, one of Mennen's Latin \merican markets. 
"'I slill like home best, mainly . I guess, because I hate being with- 
out my famib." Mennen adds. The fainib consists of his wife, a 
Ll-\ ear-old daughter and 1 1 -\ ear-old son. Home's at lanwood. 
N. J., except during sailing season I at the Cape) or ice boating 
(at Lake Hopatcong • . * • • 



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The TS-llA is a "nine-input" switcher designed to handle com- 
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Two rows of push huttons feed a manual fader assembly; a third 
row feeds a preview channel. A program transfer switch is provided 
to interchange the preview and fader busses with the output busses 
so that the fader section can be used for previewing fades, lap dis- 
solves and superimpositions. This makes it possible to use the fader 
channels for rehearsals while the preview channel handles the 
"on-air" signal. The fader assembly feeds a mixing circuit and 
three output amplifiers which are a part of the TS-llA, eliminating 
the need for installing elaborate distribution amplifier systems 
external to the switcher. The new switcher is free of microphonics 
and low frequency tilt and bounce, so that a stabilizing amplifier 
need not be added as part of the switching system. 

For further information about this exclusive RCA development get in touch 
with your RCA Broadcast Sales Representative. In Canada, write RCA Victor 
Ltd., Montreal. 




The TS-llA Switcher is supplied with an RCA console 
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power supplies to form a complete versatile system. 




RCA PIONEERED AND DEVELOPED COMPATIBLE COLOR TELEVISION 

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION CAMDEN, N. J. 



LOADED? 




"CAL" SALES is my name 

I'm loaded with sales in California 
.... if you use Channel 8, Salinas 
Monterey. This is a mighty big 
state, 800 miles long. We're 107 
miles from the nearest station. 
Affiliated with CBS, NBC, ABC 

and DuMont this market is 

a "natural" <7 cities) spendable 
income over 303 million dollars. 
ASK HOLLINCBERY. 





by Joe Csida 

Showmen at work — radio and ft* 

Week after rushed week goes by and I find myself dis- 
coursing on the television business, which ! suppose is natu- 
ral enough. But I'm nevertheless happ) when I run into -ome 
oi the electronic media's brighter fellows who are -till fight- 
ing the good fight for radio. My old friend, Dick Pack, for 
example (he's now national program director lor the We-t- 
inghouse Broadcasting Compan3 ). was telling me about the 
crusade he's started within his nun organization, and I hope 
it'll spread to other segments of the industry. Dick is urging 
a greater concentration on the pari of radio broadcasters on 
developing creative programing and production talent. 

And if you look around and keen your car- and eyes 
open, you'll discover that a number oi other knowing gents 
in the industry are in there slugging for radio . . . and what's 
possibl) more important, thai they have the materials with 
which to sing. The most recent Radio-Elect ronics-T\ Manu- 
facturers' Association report, for example, shows that in No- 
vember of 1954 1.098,725 radio sets were sold, as againsl 
1,065.785 in the same month in 1953. Du Mont, too, has 
ju-t announced that for the first time in its manufacturing 
history, it is going to produce radio sets. Adam Young, new 
head of the Station Representatives Association, insi-i- thai 
1955 i- the year in which "radio will he reborn." \\ KC V- 
Main Shea tells me thai local -ales for 1954 were lip almo-t 
50' , over 1953. And the Radio Advertising Bureau is hook- 
ing the joint four network presentation on radio around to 
the other major advertising agencies. 

It's nice, and oh. so easy to become fascinated with those 
multi-million dollar station -ales, talent deal-, el al which 
seem to pop every other day in television, but it's equally 
nice and could he quite profitable — for us all to keep an 
alert eve on old, dependable radio. Those million plus peo- 
ple who bouehl -els aren't planning to fry egss on 'em. 



One of the reasons l\ make- new- i- because it's still in 
the we'11-try-anything era. \ few days back Jackii Gleason 
annnounced a new stunl which could conceivabl) revolutionize 

selling procedure- on l\. Jackie, who weighs a joll} 265 
pound-, lold \P reporter Jinum Bacon in Hollywood that on 
an earl) show he was going to weigh himseU in lull view oJ 
hi> 10 or 50 million viewer-, lie i- going to announce that 
i Please turn to page 69 > 



32 



SPONSOR 




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32% more than all six other New York stations combined 

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Soiree: ARB. November '54. 7 am to 6 pm. Monday through Friday 



I 

24 JANUARY ! 955 
I 



By Hen Bodev and Alfred J. Jaffe 

Ban Bodei was formerlj conci rned « itli talent 
buying at JWT, K&E and V&C and was v.p. 
in charge of radio-H t"i General Irtists I orp 




Controlling 
factor in «' 
least l') name show 




"' 1 



?*-£ 



'See ne*J page for complete list 




r 



dnlr,,m, l{: W- ^ ' 

/«'"'f f'/i „/ *l 

''-' W name </,„„,. ■ 



A K 5 




AGENTS: have they 
won control over tv costs ? 



They play a more dominant role in tv than ever before 

xl> 1955 get- under way and the buyers <>l network t\ begin making plans foi the 
upcoming season, (hero is a growing and uncomfortable feeling among them thai thej 
are being whirled about in a vortex of rising costs that is be\oml their control. The 
ad agencies are examining their slide rulss and finding costs-per-1,000 leveling oft 
and. in some cases, rising. Yet. the ballooning prices for star talent, which have 
already reached box-car figures, -how no sign of being deflated. 

On the contrary, talent price- appear headed relentlessl) toward blue-sk} levels. 
The Jackie Gleason deal with Huick staggered the business, and the new Ed Sullivan 
and Kalph Edwards network pacts were like >alt in the wound-. \\ ord i- going around 
that the asking price for Milton Berle and Hob Hope for next season i- about 
SI 20.000 per show. And thai price i- net. 

Vs the ad agencies ask themselves what i- happening and express the tear that the 
glamor and excitement brought into tv via the star system is coming home to roost with 



24 JANUARY 1955 



35 




PART ONE 

OF A TWO-PART SERIES 



a \engean< r. sonic of the more knowl- 



Heavy use of names in \ BC and (AIS 

spectaculars is playing into hands of talent 

industry's two powerful agents, some admen feel. 

Top, "Arsenic and Old Lace" from CBS' "Best 

of Broadway" and SBC spectacular "Yellowjack." 

Stars abate include Peter Lone. Helen 

Hayes, Boris Karloff, Billie Burke, Dennis 

O'Keefe, Dane Clark, Eva Marie Saint 

and Jackie Coopei 



A 







^i ^ 



*4.^ ^ ^ 



-«- ^< 



Bigger slice for one star affects others u ho strive for 

s<:nir terms to maintain prestige. Admen fear Jut Lie Gleason 

pact with (AiS and Buick nil! hare this effect 

on name video talent 




Network competition, via UK's rise, mm bid up talent 

prices mine, some tear, linn, ii;i \s Robert 

II eiinian. Ton\ Mai tin 



edgeable admen are taking stock and 
seeking significances. Some of the 
i auses they cite for rising costs are 
lamiliar ones but in some agency 
circles there are whispers of new vil- 
lains in the piece and their initials 
are William Morris Agency and Music 
Corporation of America. Occupation: 
talent agents. 

\\ hile the word "agents" is again 
being used as an epithet and the finger 
pointing at \\ M and MCA is unmis- 
takable not everybody agrees on the 
extent to which the pair is responsible 
for biking network tv show costs. 

To put the role of talent agents in 
proper perspective as well as analyze 
the reasons for the current cost situa- 
tion. SPONSOR is undertaking two arti- 
cles on the subject. 

To pin down the facts (and opin- 
ions i about n costs, sponsor went to 

both buyers and sellers of talent. It 
lound some sources close-mouthed but 
others willing to talk if they were not 
quoted. The latter were mostly found 
among the top air ad agencies. Here 
are the reasons gi\en for the current 
high cost of living with t\ performers: 
'• \\ ith the increasing influx of big 
names into t\. \\ M and MCA have 
moved briskb and confidently into the 
video talent markets and now clearly 
dominate the selling of both perform- 
ing and non-performing talent. While 
both firms have lorn; been powerful in 
the talent field and were important 
during radio's halcyon days, their in- 
fluence in tv is greater than it evei 

was in the am medium. 

Tlii~ great influence is confined to 
nighttime t\. bul that's where it counts. 
Since talent negotiation is often a 
behind-the-scenes business, and since 

\\ M and MCA sometimes represent 
lessei agents in selling programs and 
performers, a clear-cut and accurate 
count ol the shows in which the) have 
a finger is hard to come by. Accord- 
ing to information available to SPON- 
SOR, W M and MC \ togethei represent, 
control "i book performing talent on 
">.". out of 1 I I nighttime network t\ 
shows on \l'.< . CHS. and NBC. One 
source said \\ M actualb controls 52 



35 



SPONSOR 



network tv packages on both nighttime 
and daytime schedules. 

Their real influence can he more 
accuratel) gauged, the agencies say, 
when the program list is confined to 
"name" shows. There are 57 shows on 
the above three networks which are 
generall) considered in that categ<n\. 
Of these I". WM and MCA represent. 
control in hook the talent in 38 cases 
and in eijjbt other shows, the two firms 
are of prime importance in booking 
talent. "Independent" stars are Bob 
Hope. Arthur Godfrey, Groucho Marx 
I who has been booked in movies l>\ 



MCA i. lie I Skelton, Imogene Coca, 
Eve \nlcn. Pel i j Como, Robert 
^ oung and Ronald ' ioleman. 

Futhermore, il is pointed out. the 
influence of \\ M and MC \ lend- to be 
self-perpetuating. Thej are a magnel 
for talent on the \\a\ up who arc rep- 
resented b) smaller agents and w In > 
naturall) gravitate to the agent with 
the best connection-. 

And il that i-u i enough proof, it is 
added, the \\ \I-MC A domination is 
nailed down l>\ their stable of writers, 
producers and directors. WM is cred- 
ited with the largest group of writers 



in the talent representation business. 
Both agents are thus able, agenc) men 
say, to use theii stai pel Forming talent 
as a level in packaging all the elements 
"l a show. 

\\ bile nobodj saj - thai \\ \l or 
MCA actual!) force the netwoi k- oi 
advertisers to use non-performing tal- 
. ni as the price ol getting a star, there 
was a recenl case cited where an 

\ found itself shackled in i I -- 

ing new writers for a show thai was 

going badlj because \\ \1. which rep 

resented the star, had exclusive booking 

(Please turn to page 1 10 i 



lliiiiiiilliliiiiliiiilliiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii' 

MCA and William Morris hold key to talent prices on 38 
out of 57 marquee-name shows on nighttime network tv 



NIGHT 



ABC 



AGENT 



CBS 



AGENT 




Pantomime Quiz 



MCA 



Jack Benn) 
\ n n Sothern 
GE Theatre 
Ed Sullivan 
Robert Young 



mca 

WM 

MCA 

mca 

tGAC 



Max Liebman Presents \\ M 

Corned) Hour *VAR. 

Loretta Young W M 

Robert Cummings MCI 



MONDAY 



Pen) Como 

Burns & Allen 
I Love LuC) 



GAC Tony Martin MCA 

MCA Sid Caesar MCA 

MCA Producer's Shov is< *\AR. 




Dannv Thomas 



H M 



Red Skelion 
Ronald Colman 



*\AR. 
EUR. 



Dinah Shore 
Milton Berle 
Martha Rave 
Bob Hope 



WM 

WM 

*V/IR. 



WEDNESDAY 



Walt Disne) 
Stu Erwin 



tOflt. Best of Broadway *VAR. 

WM Godfrey & Friends fDlR. 



THURSDAY 



Jane Froman 
Ray Milland 
< llimax 

1-Siar Playhouse 
Shower of Stars 



WM 
MCA 
*VAR. 
FJIK. 
*VAR. 



I ddie Fisher 
Joan Davis 
My Little Margii 
Kal jili Edwards 



Dinah Shore 
Groucho Marx 

Dragnet 
Ford Theatre 
Lux Theatre 



MCA 
WM 
WM 
MCA 



WM 

in it. 

MCA 
*VAK. 
t AH. 




Ozzie & Harriet 
Ray Bolger 



MCA 
WM 



Perr) Como 
Eve Arden 



GAC 
OIK. 



Eddie Fisher 

Red Buttons 
\\ illiam Bendix 
Peti ' I av ford 



MC I 
MCA 

n m 

WM 



SATURDAY 



Jackie (.leason 
June Havoc 



MCA Mickej Roonej »l M 

MCA [mogene I IHR. 

JininiN Durante W M 

Donald O'Connoi H M 

Mas I i liinaii Presi nts M M 

Geo] g( I robe! MC I 



MCA and WM participate In booking stars on these shows. rDcal direct for their services with network. (General Artists Corp. agents this show (or Screen Gems 



24 JANUARY 1955 



37 



National 



^ 



SpoT 



RADIO 



^^easonal selling 
^^ectional selling- 
^Supplemental selling 
Mflff^/mg' and market testing' 
jk maturation selling- 
™ Spreading acceptance 



* tNWV* #*##&$ 



* to spec/46 &ae#s 
-k treesracu r?M£S 

b4T£Ot(/£eC09 r ' 




l.v.viff IIIIH'llf.v: New SRA presentation stresses spot radio's ability XtlvttntUlft's: "Educational'' presentation by rep industry 

to handle all six major assignments (see above) admen may have sums up half-doien top advantages of spot radio on blackboard 



group 
above 



Big 1055 push for spot radio 

\«'u presentations, creative* uses, sales plans are sparking renewed 
confidence among* salesmen as they unveil 1955 sales pitches 



*. ▼ pot radio salesmen have far more 
confidence in the value of their air 
medium today, and their abilitj t<> sell 
il to leading advertisers during L955, 
than thev have had for main months. 

This "upbeal feeling was clearly 
evident in conversations SPONSOR had 
earlier this month with radio rep firms 
and spol industr) groups. The grow- 
ing confidence wa-n t confined onl\ to 
the industr) leaders, either. Execu- 
tives ul a wide range of organizations 
\ oiced then faith in spol radio s im- 
portanl rule In 1955 ad campaigns. 

I ncluded among rep firms survej ed : 
Vvery-Knodel, John Blair, CBS Radio 
Spol Sales, Henrj I. Christal, Donald 
Cooke, Edward Devney, Free & Peters, 
Headlej Reed, ll-l! Reps, Katz \gen- 
cy, NBC Spot Sales, and Vdam Young, 
Jr. Discussions were also held with 
executives of the Radio \dvertising 
Bureau, the Station Representatives 
Association, and Qualit) Radio Group. 

\\ iili spol radio business off for the 
In -i time foi -'Pine l.i-i j eai . you might 
• isil) feel thai the everydaj sales ef- 
forts and full-dress spol radio presen 



38 



tations \<>ull see this year will lack 
punch and direction. 

But you'd he wrong. Bv all indica- 
tions, 1955 will be the year of the "hig 
push" for spot radio. 

Several factors lie behind the hull- 
i>h attitude of spot radio's supporters 
and sales organizations. 

• They're armed with more facts 
than ever about their medium. Sales 
executives are more thorough!) briefed 
on the advantages and disadvantages 
ol competing air and print media. 

• Spot radio rep- have dug down 
hard to find out more about marketing 
problems and aims of advertisers. Vs 
a result, reps toda) expect to tailor 
their 1955 day-to-da) selling much 
more preciselj and creativel) to the 
needs ol prospective clients and the) 
expect more business as a result. 

• Salesmen no longer must do an 
(•durational, as well a- selling, job 
when thev call on main agencies and 



status report 



advertisers. I hev are being hack- 
stopped more and more In the heav v 
artillerv of major industr) promotions, 
and by the educational efforts of some 
of the major rep firms. 

To show vou what 1955 spot radio 
sales efforts look like in closeup. spon- 
sor herewith presents highlights of 
-everal pitches huyers can expert to 
see in weeks to come. 

I hev include two broad presenta- 
tions from industr) groups. The first, 
hv the SRA. is an up-to-date review 
of spot radio- value-. The other, hv 
the I! \B. outline- spot radio"- com- 
petitive strength againsl print media. 

Two other presentations, from CBS 
Radio Spot Sales and Free Si Peters, 

are also hmadlv educational in na- 
ture, hut show how specific spot radio 

campaigns can produce sizable audi- 
ences at low cost. 

SPONSOR will also present, in round- 
up I < n in. a preview of the 1955 sales 

tactics "I several leading reps and 
sales organizations, ranging from 
heav ici stress on the traditional val- 
ue- and pii< ling ol spol radio to multi- 
market program and announcement 

SPONSOR 




*>6,se>8- 



V 







AT rwE^p 1 




T'jVr* 




I' i.vf rifmJ ion: Major point made in SRA pitch is radio reaches 
virtually ICO'r of U.S. population indoors, outdoors, or on the job 




First agency group to see SRA slide presentation 

Isted o) executives o) Scheideler, Beck & B 

Preview was held on 24 \ovember. L. t<> r.: Joseph 

Scheideler, SHU president; irt \ici ' Knodel; 

Reg Rollinson, SR I I era Brennan, >/.'// rmlio-iv directoi 

Paul If iincr. executive v.p. oj SB If ad agency 



T 



plans designed for major clients. 

\ good Minimal) of 1955-style spot 
radio salesmanship was made to spon- 
sor bj Adam J. Young. Jr. president 
of the SRA and himself a veteran ra- 
dio and tv station representative. 
\ oung stated: 

"We've gone through a cycle of 
changing conditions and changing re- 
quirements in spot radio. Now. in 
1955. you'll see creative selling that 
stems from sound, salable program 
structures. In short, the industry will 



sell spot radio on the basis of what 
it does best — reaching more people 
per dollar than any other medium." 

The* SRA: The Station Representa- 
tives Association has developed, and 
has already started to use. a new 
educational slide presentation titled 
"What's Ahead In Spot Radio?" It 
was previewed late in November for 
executives of Scheideler, Beck & Wer- 
ner ad agency, and will be shown dur- 
ing 1955 to admen and agencies at an 



average rate of twice a week. 

For its curtain-raiser, this presen- 
tation uses a 20-minute tape recording 
of some of the best and latest of to- 
day's crop of spot radio jingles. I hoc 
include air jingles of Hunt's Tomato 
Sauce, Halo. Ford. Chevrolet. Coca- 
Cola, ALL, Rinso and Coebel's Beer. 
The idea, as Tom Flanagan. SR \ 
managing director, describes it is "to 
let admen hear the kind of spot radio 
selling devices that have moved bil- 
I Please turn to pai:c ' >-l i 



Three 1955 spot radio pitches from reps are highlighted below. L. to 
r.: CBS Spot Radio Sales, which stresses spot radio audience growth; 
Avery-Knodel, which piomotes new rate structure (linked to share of 
Pulse-measured audience) of KXYZ, Houston; Weed, which is using a 



station-prepared presentation from WCOP, Boston, which shows homes 
reached per dollar in radio, tv and newspapers. Most 1955 rep pitches 
will be tailored to needs and advertising policies of individual air 
advertisers, will be baclcstopped by industry selling of SRA and RAB 



BS Radio Spot Sales' stations... 
S, New York and KNX, Los Angeles 
programming is reaching larger 
3nces today than ever before 



I 



GE HOMES REACHED BY IOCAI PROGRAMMING 








WCBS 
New York 


KNX 
Los Angeles 


'/ 1 A 49 


632 970 


166 630 


54 


765 940 


300 S60 









24 JANUARY 1955 



"REALISTIC PRICING METHOD" - KXYZ - HOUSTON 



Based on KXYZ's average share of audience, and not related 
to total homes using radio at any given time. 



Cost - Minute Announcement 



* 17.251 



% Homes Using Radio 



4 17.25 



-L J 



9 io ii Noon i23*56?fl9ioii Mid 




to reach the CREAM MARKET 
of New England, the 
30- mile Boston area.. 
$625 WEEKLY BUYS 1 OF THESE 



7 5 047 honKi 



37 5 000 hom.s 



1 171 845 ho™. 



us.no NtWSPAPERS 



using TILIV1SION 



RADIO 



39 



tip 




STAR SHINES THE SPONSORS SHOES: Peter Donald 
wield; cloth as S. M. Abrams, Esquire president, grins at stunt 
staged during dealer meeting. Esquire puts high value on mer- 
chandising its advertising to dealers through appearances as 
well as brochures showing what ad program consists of 




>/ 



Wl 



th 



ESQUIR 

BOOT POL I* 






%. 



^y -j 



% , 



17 




i 





Esquire hits 'em hard 
mi 1 1 . . . but not too often 



Shoe polish firm seeks to make imparl I lie siihcoiiscious will retain 

and spread il lo wide audiences. Deems repetition lo same niiflieiice 
wasteful I'or impulse item thai is purchased infrequent I v 

40 SPONSOR 



C^ an you sell a low-cost impulse item 
without advertising frequency ? 

Put this question to most admen and 
you'd get a quick "no" for an answer. 
But the Knomark Manufacturing Co. 
of Brooklyn, producers of the Esquire 
line of shoe polishes, base their tele\ i- 
sion approach today on the concept 
that it's better to hit more people less 
often than to reach a single audience 
with drum-fire repetition. 

It's for this reason, as well as the 
inevitable problem of cost, that Es- 
quire is an alternate-week network tel- 
evision client on a program which 
the companj believes provides it with 
a rotating audience. Esquire sponsors 
the ABC T\ panel show Masquerade 
Party, confident that it tends to at- 
tract a changing group of people. 

Knomark has been active on the air 
for a decade, ever since the then-small 
firm launched the Esquire brand as 
the first heavily-advertised 25c shoe 
polish in its industry. Spot radio in- 
itially and network television since 
1950 have helped to build Knomark to 
the point where it does about 259? 
of the dollar volume of the shoe pol- 
ish business I by its own estimate). 
The company believes that in the 25c 
line it has over 50/v of the market. 

The company's historv since it 
turned to radio and tv has been one 
ol steady advance. It has been right 
more often than wrong. But how does 
il justify today's reliance on hard-hit- 
ting messages rather than frequency? 

Shoe polish, the company answers, 
is an impulse item, true. But it is one 
bought infrequently, not like soap or 
toothpaste. It is seldom put on the 
shopping list, is picked up most often 
as an afterthought. This simple ob- 
servation has a number of very serious 
consequences for tv. 

In the first place, it becomes un- 
necessary, even wasteful, to bombard 
the consumer with a tremendous num- 
ber of reminder-type announcements 
on a daily basis. Instead — and this is 
the basic point — the advertising must 
be conceived in terms of its ability to 
deliver a lasting impression, to make a 
dent in the subconscious which can 
pay off ultimately at the point-of-sale. 

This is one of the major reasons 
why Knomark prefers show sponsor- 



Thrve things Esquire U'umetl ahuut television 



1 



Ad continuity is needed even with seasonal sales pattern. 
Till 1951, firm went in for three-month fall and spring air 
campaigns, but has since adopted the year-'round approach. 



2 



3 



Audience will not believe that shiny shoe it sees toward end 
of chow is same as the one polished at the beginning and al- 
lowed to dry. It's better to use shoe prepared in advance. 



It does not matter whether client likes the commercial. Kno- 
mark execs never preview commercials, prefer to see them in 
their own living rooms as if they were shoe polish customers. 



ship to announcement campaigns. As 
sales and ad manager Mel Birbaum 
puts it: "It takes time to do a selling 
job." The short announcement period 
is simply inadequate for this job. 

For the same reason, the show that 
has a ficrcelv loyal audience would 
not inevitablv mean more in sales ef- 
fectiveness for Knomark. What is im- 
portant is that the show reach its au- 
dience several times during a season. 

(Knomark sponsored Godfrey in 
1953. now feels that while Godfre) 
proved a great salesman it had just 
about saturated his loval audience bv 
the time its sponsorship of his morn- 
ing show had run its course.) 

Knomark hopes Masquerade Party 
will provide a varying audience at 
low cost. The $46,000 time-and-talent 
package is attractive and study of sim- 
ilar programs suggests to Knomark 
that the panel show general I v has a 
considerable proportion of new or oc- 



• asional \ iewers each week. 

Knomark's research will tell it how 
well it has guessed. In the meantime, 
the compan) is sure that it would 
lather reach filtv million people with 
three powerful sales pitches dining a 
season than five million with Id 
pitches. 

The 20.4 Nielsen rating for Decem- 
ber is thus considered quite satisfac- 
tory. And if the pace can be main- 
tained in the hire cd tough competi- 
tion from The Kraft Television Thea- 
ter (NBC T\ i and Strike It Rich 
I CBS TV I . Knomark will doubtless 
feel content with the cumulative cov- 
erage the show i- producing. 

So important does Knomark regard 
impact that it w ill sacrifice circulation 
to attain it if necessary. This is why 
its ad budget allocates 50' '< to tv. leav- 
ing 30' < for magazines and Sunday- 
supplements and the rest for trade and 
{Please turn to page 1 02 > 



Knomark tv vehicle is "Masquerade Party" on 85 ABC stations, Wed. 9:00 9:30 p.m. 
Panel tries to guess the identity of the "masqueraders." M.C. is Peter Donald, standing 



case history 




24 JANUARY 1955 



41 



Recommended Practices for Advertising Age ^ 



K.(lt€S. The agency is bound to seek for its client the lowest rate available for any class of 

advertising. 

(note: The A. A. A. A. Standard Forms of Contracts for Spot Radio and Spot Telecasting provide 

that the rate quoted is the lowest rate charged anyone for like services, and that "there shall be 

no secret rates, rebates, or agreements affecting rates.") 

Agency people, therefore, should encourage broadcasters to publish any special rates that may be 
quoted, as soon as they are made available to anyone. 

Merchandising Cooperation. The advertising agency may accept whatever merchandis- 
ing cooperation a broadcaster regularly makes available. 

However, agency people should not demand or encourage free services that are not a proper func- 
tion of broadcasters, or are in excess of what is generally regarded by broadcasters as proper. 

lUullClty . (a) Decisions as to whether publicity items should be broadcast are properly 
in the province of the broadcaster, and under the law he is solely responsible. 

Agency people should not attempt to influence a broadcaster's editorial judgment on publicity 
items by promises of advertising or other pressure tactics. 

News, editorial and other publicity items should be sent separately and should never be in- 
cluded with advertising orders. 

(b) Agency people should not expect broadcasters to use publicity which has no clearly rec- 
ognizable news, educational, or editorial value. 

On the other hand, submission of a news item by an advertising agency should not prevent 
its being broadcast if it does have real news, educational, or other editorial value. 

(c) Agency people should not seek to get broadcasters to accept as free "public service" program 



ft 

me 
apf 

Co 
at 

Pr< 



lis takes stand against nk 



K<'< < Herniations published this week are effort to encourage high husim 



ida 



M i in the first time, the Vmerican Association "I Vdvertis- Though < a it-full \ phrased after long committee and legal 

in" \srencies thi* week eoes on record with oublie recom- sifting, the document i^- .1 firm effort 1>\ the I \ s to en- 

DOC ' ' 

mendations to agencies against: courage high business standards. (A statement on rela- 

1. Spe< ial rate deals with radio and t\ stations. lions between agencies and newspapers had been published 

2. Demands from agencies for merchandising coopera- as far back as 1937, was last updated in 1950.) 

linn r I1.1t are "not a proper function of broadcasters." "We haven't timed the recommendations for litis month 

'». Attempts to influence broadcasters in their use of with the feeling there was a specific fire to be put out," 

publicity items l>\ promises oi advertising. said a I \'s official, noting that the) had been long in 

The I \- recommendations, shown in full on these preparation. The recommendations w«re drafted 1>\ the 

pages, will in effe< t give timebuyers and other agency 1 V's committee on broadcast media, chaired l>\ BBDO's 

broadcast executives a "bjble" t<> < ite when asked to Frank Silvernail; the) were approved 1>\ the I ^'s board 

pressure stations bj clients 01 others. of directors on 20 October last year. 

Xrticlf next isHtw will «#•««• Industry reaction* to I \s recommendations fBftucrtD 

42 — — — — SPONSOR 



wple in their Relations with Broadcasters 

material, publicity that is clearly commercial. 

If the program material mentions products or services by name, most broadcasters regard it as 
commercial and require that it be placed at regular time rates. 

Xerograms and LiO?n7ne?CialS. fhe effectiveness of broadcasting as an advertising 
medium may be impaired by any program or commercial which arouses resentment in any 
appreciable portion of the public. 

Commercials which are over-long, over-repetitious, in poor taste, or which interrupt programs 
at inappropriate times, are likely to cause criticism. 

Programs which are deemed by any considerable segment of the public to be in bad taste, to 
be over-commercialized, or to exert any undesirable influence, especially on children, impair the 
effectiveness of broadcast advertising and endanger the editorial freedom of broadcasting. 

To avert criticism and to help keep broadcasting welcome in American homes, agency people 
should observe the spirit and letter of the A. A. A. A. Copy Code (see box below) and the radio 
and television codes of the National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters. 

Agency people can be helpful in their relations 
with broadcasters by recognizing the paramount importance of the public interest aspects of 
programing. 

The public's interest should be as much a concern of the advertising agency as it is of the broad- 
caster, not only because it is one of the service opportunities for which broadcasters are 
licensed, but also because it is the key to audience loyalty. 

Nothing should be initiated or proposed which in any way fails to show consideration for the 
public interest. copyright 1954, American association of advertising agencies, inc. 



ills, merchandising excesses 

I 

iidarils anil give timebuyer a "bible" to cite when he's asked to pressure stations 



ADVERTISING COPY (Section 1 of the Standatds of Practice of the American Association of Advertising Agencies) 







The advertising agency should not recommend, and 
should discourage any advertiser from using, any 
advertising of an untruthful, indecent or otherwise 
objectionable character, as exemplified by the fol- 
lowing copy practices disapproved in a code jointly 
adopced by the American Association of Advertising 
Agencies and the Association of National Advertisers, 
and also by the Advertising Federation of America: 



A. False statements or misleading exaggerations. 

B. Indirect misrepresentation of a product, or service, 
through distortion of details, or of their true perspec- 



tive, either editorially or pictorially. 

C. Statements or suggestions offensive to public decency. 

D. Statements which tend to undermine an industry by 
attributing to its products, generally, faults and weak- 
nesses true only of a few. 

E. Price claims that arc misleading 

P. Pseudoscientific advertising, including claims insuffi- 
ciently supported by accepted authority, or that distort 
the true meaning or practicable application of a state- 
ment made by professional or scientific authority. 

C Testimonials which do not reflect the real choice of a 
competent witness. 



6 BURNETT'S 
BANKS 




:. ESTY'S 

r\ li 1 1 (k 




8. CONTINENTAL 

BAKING'S 

MARSHALL 



9. NES Ills 
CADY 




10. LENNEN 
b Nl nil, 
TOIGO 




Id iii I'll pose lop radio- 



0. How can spot radio be made 
more exciting to an advertiser's 
sales force and dealers? 

I I I 



i r 
i i 
i i 



I ■ Will the television network 
spectaculars be continued in the 



coming season: 



"V 



Dr. Seymour Banks 
Media manager, Leo Burnett Co. 



Chicago 



This has long heen a problem for spot ra- 
dio admen; the most usual complaint: 

"I here's nothing visual to show dealers, 
and no one single program to ballyhoo. 

i See "Spot radio is bigger than you 
think."" SPONSOR 9 \ugu-t '54.) 

Hut many clients do get around these 
obstacles and derive strong merchandising 
benefits from their spot radio campaigns. 
Here are three basic approaches. 

1. Merchandise the message: Spot radio 
commercials with strong production values 
can be merchandised with all the showman- 
ship associated with the trade promotion of 
color spreads. Disks can be played as the 
"theme" of dealer meetings. Copies can be 
sent along with appropriate literature to 
hc\ dealers, with the suggestion they be 
played at borne "to give you an idea of the 
advertising support in your area. 

2. Promote production: Jingles often 
lend themselves to publicity campaigns and 
^1 >!■< ial promotions. A Phil Davis jingle 
for Falstaff Beer was parlayed into a full- 
length record for juke boxes because of its 
catchy rhythms. Singer Peggy King is now 
a well-publicized Columbia Records star 
because of her bouncy spot commercials for 
Hunt's Tomato Sauce. When you use name 
talent, as in the Halo e.t.'s (a whole Hit 
Parade of popular singers sang them) and 
the Ford parody of This Ole House with 
Etosemar) Clooney, talent could be used to 
perform the jingle live at major conven- 
tions. Jingles can be plugged on tv, too. 
\lercur\ had Patti Page and Rise Stevens 
perform a calypso jingle on Toast of the 
Town, thus building interest in what was 
mainb a spot radio commercial. 

3. Merchandise the concept: Salesmen 
and dealers are seldom given an enthusi- 
astic (ill-in on the details of big spot radio 
campaigns. A presentation, which sale-- 
men can carry in dealer calls, can cite them. 

Main idea: make dealer- realize the sheer 
volume and scope of spol radio. * * * 



I 

-y 1 

Dr. Wallace H. Wulteck 
Chairman, executive com., William Esty Co. 

"The future of the spectacular is unlim- 
ited."" says NBC's Pat Weaver. ". . . The 
spectaculars have just begun their exhilar- 
ating influence on the television program 
schedule." 

\\ caver makes his statement five months 
after the first spectacular hit the air. At 
NBC, they are 90-minute extravaganzas. 
frequently musical comedy shows, always 
starring big Hollvwood names. They're 
telecast every fourth Monday, Saturday and 
Sunday. CBS also has high-cost star- 
studded vehicles scheduled on a once-month- 
ly basis: Best of Broadway every fourth 
Wednesday; Shower of Stars, every fourth 
Thursday. CBS does not call its 60-minute 
shows "spectaculars," however. 

While no CBS TV executive ventured an 
official pronunciamento. comments at the 
network don't indicate a long life for the 
once-monthly hour shows. Both Best of 
Broadway and Shower of Stars sponsors. 
Chrysler and Westinghouse, had specific 
reasons for wanting to "create excitement ' 
during the 1954-55 season. There's no 
guarantee that the same form of excite- 
ment-making programing will be used in 
fall 1955. 

If spectaculars remain an integral part 
of NBC TV's programing in fall 1955. 
the) could emerge as one-hour rather than 
90-minute show-. 

The rating -tor\ to date seems to indi- 
cate that these $200,000 to $320,000 NBC 
vehicles can gather momentum. Nielsen's 
six-minute rating- Eoi the iir-t two NBC 
-how- wcie h'i.7 and 39.1 respect i\ eh. The 
lale-\o\ ember and earh -December spec- 
taculars, Best Foot Forward and Spotlight, 
raked up a II. 1 and 13.3 respectively. 

On CBS l\. Best of Broadway has had 
Nielsens ranging from 33.6 for the 15 Sep- 
tembei -how to 2'). 5 for Panama llallie on 
Hi November. Shower of Stars began with 

a 35.7 on 30 September, bad a 29.5 on 18 

November. * * * 



44 



SPONSOR 




Part two of a series of qiacvslions asked 
bv nil men. answered by SPONSOR. 
First five questions ran last issue 



r 



n 



8. 



Will there be any drastic 
changes in network radio opera- 
tions in 7955? 



I I 



I 



"V 






Lee Mack Marshall 
Advertising manager, Continental Baking Co. 

'Noj saj top aetwork radio executives. 

Network radio in L955 will tend to con- 
tinue the program patterns that were intro- 
duced during the pasl two \ears, hut the 
basic structure of the radio networks is not 
likeK t<> undergo am major changes dur- 
ing this year. 

"The aim of todaj 's network radio ad- 
vertisers continues to be for lame cumula- 
tive audiences," sa\s tbe head of one radio 
network. "That's why the trend away from 
sponsoring a weekl) show toward buying 
of frequent smaller segments will probably 
continue in 1955." 

Despite constant reappraisals of pro- 
graming structures by the networks, net- 
work radio billings during the first 1 1 
months of 1954 (even on the gross "basis" 
used by 1MB • were 13.6% lower than dur- 
ing the comparable period in 1953. 

Network executives point out that the 
loss in billings reflects different radio Inn- 
ing philosophies, rather than a loss in num- 
ber of clients. In other words, generally, 
the four networks have more clients than 
ever, buying smaller units of time than 
previously. MBS, for example, showed an 
11.27o decrease in billings in the 11-month 
period of 1954 compared with the 11- 
month period of 1953. but the network had 
12' J more sponsors numerically than be- 
fore. 

A top MBS executive feels that the time 
is in sight when networks will have essen- 
tial!) two things to sell: (1 i insertions of 
minute announcements into existing pro- 
grams through spot carrier plans that the 
networks already have — a sort of a "run- 
of-the-network" system of rotating an- 
nouncements during daytime and night- 
time. (2) "A custom line"' of programing, 
that is, programing directed at specific seg- 
ments in the mass audience. There'll he a 
qualitative pinpointing of the audience. 
MBS expects to introduce some of its 
i Please turn to page 109 I 



". Will network television cut- 
ins be used more frequently by 
advertisers in 7955? 

v 



r 



Donald Cady 
V.p. charge of general adv., The Nestle Co. 



\ number of established tv advertisers dis- 
covered network tv cut-ins in 1954. It is 
likely that many more network advertisers 
will use local and regional-cut-ins in 1955 
as more new markets are added to the 
basic network lineup. 

Cut-ins are expensive and stations gen- 
erally dislike them because of the extra 
crew work involved. Networks dislike the 
servicing that's involved. But advertisers 
have found cut-ins very valuable for three 
purposes: (1) to introduce new products 
with limited distribution; (2) to localize 
sales messages over a network show; (3) 
to give dealer tags. 

The cost of local tv cut-ins usually varies 
between 7y 2 % and 10% of the station's 
average hourly nighttime rate. However, 
there's even greater variation than that. 
For example, if a station has its full crew 
and facilities available at the time when the 
local cut-in is scheduled, then the rate is 
likely to be relatively moderate. Suppose, 
however, that the cut-in falls sometime in 
the middle of a block of network program- 
ing, during which the station maintain- 
only a skeleton staff — in that instance, the 
charge is likely to be pretty stiff. 

Costs have varied from as little as $11 to 
as much as $600 for a minute or less cut-in. 
(Please turn to page 111 ) 



10. 



What one- and two-station 
markets of importance will get 
additional tv stations in 7955? 



I I- - 



--v J 

Adolph Toigo 
President, Lennen & Newell 



SPONSOR asked adman Toigo what he con- 
sidered a "market of importance." The 
answer: "One- and two-station markets in 
the top 50, according to Sales Management 
population figures." 

The answer was sought from a variet) 
"I sources: station relations executives of 
the leading tv webs, tv station reps, agenc) 
ie-ean lier- and standard research work-, 
like Codel's Factbook. This is the essence 
of what SPONSOR learned: 

1. As the year begins, tv has grown to 
the point where it is available to 90% of 
the population. \ll but four of the na- 
tion's 233 leading market areas are within 
the effective range of over 400 tv outlets, 
according to SSCB"s Media Research Direc- 
tor, Dick Dunne. 

2. But t\ station distribution Mill isn't 
what most leading tv advertisers would 
like it to be. In the top 50 markets, five 
still had onh one active tv channel as 
SPONSOR went to press, and 14 markets had 
oidy two active stations. 

3. In onl\ a few of these markets — such 
as Providence and Tampa — is there am 
certainly of more t\ stations taking to the 
air during 1955. \ lew "top 50" such as 
Won ester. Mass. — have only a maximum 
of two channels assigned 1>\ the FCC, usu- 

i Please nun to page 112) 



Are spot tv rate increases entirely justified by additional viewers 

or are they, in part, based on the long list of advertisers who seek spot 

availabilities? Lester Krugman, advertising manager, Bulova Watch Co. 

What's the outlook for syndicated film in 1955? George T. LaBoda 
radio and tv director, Colgate-Palmolive Co. 

Is there any chance that tv network advertisers will be able to add 
network radio in non-tv markets only so as to get 100% U.S. coverage 
with one network buy? Donald W. Stewart, advertising manager, The Texas Co. 

Are rising costs freezing out the small- and medium-sized advertiser 
from tv? H. H. Horton, director of advertising. Singer Sewing Machine Co. 

Do radio commercials today have the same impact as before tv? 

Samuel Winokur, vice president, Seeman Bros. 



4 
5 



ire I v commercials 
getting word-lazy ? 

ItlSDO's Art Brllairc warns that trite 
words ran kill g'oocl campaign iclras 





trthur Bellaire, author of the scries of 
three articles starting this issue, is v.p. 
in charge of radio and tr commercial copy 
at BBDO. It commercial copy, he feels, 
has fallen into a tired, hackneyed pat- 
tern that no longer commands listening. 
To pep it up — with a possibility of pep- 
ping sales, too — copywriters must revital- 
ize their approach, search for fresh words 



M t happens all 
tising. The Big 
experienced hand 
eager cub. 
Big ( ... "\\ hal counts 



too often in adver- 
Copywriter lays an 
on the head of the 
'Listen, son. savs the 
in this Business 
is the Campaign Idea. Basic Think- 
ing. Any damn fool can fill in the 
words. 

Part of the statement cannot he de- 
nied. Hut if he's referring to televi- 
sion, tin- other part should he revised 
as follows: "Listen, sou. Too main 
damn fools are filling in the words. 

Sure -good advertising will always 
require sound basic thinking and 
shrewd strateg) on the part of the 
copywriter. Yet the successful advent 
of tin- sight-and-sound medium makes 
it painfull) evident that the copywrit- 
ii who takes his "words" lightly and 
lets down, once lie has established the 
selling plan, is all hut admitting 
that the viewer won't pa) much at- 
tention to his commercial anyway. In 
television a good campaign idea can 
die fa<t il the copywriter persists in 
being "word-lazy." 



Perhaps through this first phase of 
televisions phenomenal growth the 
copywriter has been too impressed 
with the power of the picture to gi\e 
the spoken word its due. Perhaps onl) 
now i> he discovering that this same 
medium which eat~ entertainment ma- 
terial alive and requires almost un- 
believable Stocks of replenishment con- 
sumes commercial copj at an equal 
rate. If a talented performer must 
constant!) change his material to sur- 
vive the cold, penetrating stares ol the 
vast million--, how then can the copy- 
writer expect to convince this same 
audience that his product is "amaz- 
ing onl) seconds after other products 
lia\e used the same word in describ- 
ing themselves? Certainh for tin- one 



reason alone, the copywriter should 
search for new words, including new 
adjectives and verbs, each time he 
( omposes a commercial message. 
i Other media were never this unjust.) 
Clever animation and jingles save him 
temporaril) -make a hero of him fre- 
quentl) — but advertising cannot live 
on these alone. 

Now lets consider words in adver- 
tising from a second viewpoint. Lets 
compare the words in a television com- 
mercial with the words in a printed 
advertisement. 

The print writer gets the Great Idea. 
He expresses himself first with head- 
line, illustration and lav out and there 
indeed is the heart of his ad. If bis 
pride extends l>eyond that, he respects 
also the text-copy to be filled in later. 
This is an understandable order of 
work since an advertisement always 
must command attention before it can 
expect readership. And. if he is un- 
tuck) enough not to get said reader- 
ship, the copywriter usuallv has left 
.1 celling impression by counting on 
the stopping power of the large print 
and the illustration. 

Most television commercials, too — 

i speciall) the spot variety — must bid 
for attention. Sometimes notablv in 
the cases of the LO-second LI)., and 
even the 20-second chainbreak the 
television copy, loo. must work fa-t 



C O M I \ €w 



7 FEB.: .Ire tv commercials <;<»((i>ir/ picture-Iaxy? 
2/ IF.lt.: Ire tv commercial* «j«"i»in»j talent-Iaxy? 



46 



SPONSOR 



and leave the basic theme thought with 
the viewer. 

But here the similarity ends. Con- 
sider the commercial of 60 seconds or 
more, where the copywriter has time 
to do some convincing. In this longer 
copy (the great hulk of commercials 
turned out today) leading in with the 
basic theme line is sometimes wise 
and sometimes not. At any rate, at 
the beginning, or near the beginning, 
the writer must command attention 
with words other than a slogan. He 
must interest his audience with friend- 
ly, credible words. What he is ac- 
tually doing is relying on his text- 
words — not his basic theme line — to 
call for attention. Here is where he 
dare not underrate his task. Even 
with sound visual material to aid him. 
what he writes will be heard, and he 
cannot expect to sell anything when 
he borrows from a vocabulary which 
television's very character rendered 
trite and obsolete as long as two or 
three years ago. 

Let me emphasize: the basic theme 
line is no less important in tv than it 
is in print. Television puts it on the 
spot to live or die by the words (and 
pictures) that surround it. 

Obviously, it takes the proper mix- 
ture of words, or lack of them, to at- 
tain full value from the pictures in 
television commercials. Too many 
words, too few words or just the wrong 
words can subtract much from the ef- 
fectiveness of the sales story. 

One of the first sound principles of 
tv commercial writing is to make the 
words relevant to the pictures. Every 
tv copywriter knows it is wrong to 
show one thing and say another. But 
isn't it surprising how many writers 
ignore the principle? Whenever I'm 
guilty, it's usually because I'm trying 
to say too much. I have to put the 
extra words somewhere and they can 
never seem to find a scene that fits 
them. Getting the whole story in a 
minute may look nice on paper but 
it looks and sounds like nothing when 
it comes out on the television screen. 
Too many words. Too many thoughts. 
Like the Big C. says, "It ain't good 
advertising." 

Conversely, saying too little (in 
words) can result in leaving the view- 
er confused with inadequate explana- 
tion of the sales story. Ironically it's 
too bad more commercials which say 
too much don't instead say too little, 
(Please turn to page 78) 



Don't mahe these mistakes, saus Art Bt>llaire 



Relying on mere slogans 



hi I.D.'s and chainbreaks, ti 
COpj must work iast to leave 
basic theme thought with viewer. 
Hut tv copy must use more 
than slogans, especially in 
60-second commercials 




Putting 'idea' above 'words' 

All too often, this is what 
the Big Copywriter tells the 

eager cub, saying, "What 

counts in this business is 
the Campaign Idea." Result: 

hackneyed, mediocre copy 




Borrowing print copy 

Frequently, copy from a 
print ad is dropped un- 
changed into the mouth of 
the tv announcer with no 
regard for hoiv it will go 
over on the air 





Using only 'established' words 

With the tv writer especially, 
this is painfully apparent. 
The same words and phrases 
ring out over and over 
again on video. Bellaire 
lists over two dozen cliches 



the client bought this fld- 
all ya g^tta &> is rewrite 
it in script fair. €or TV/ 




Writing 'like people talk' 

This adage can't be trusted 
any more. Art Bellaire feels 
that very "sincere" 
ivords about a product from 
enthusiastic users will 
often sound the phoniest 



Cartoons by Alphonse Normandli 



24 JANUARY 1955 



47 



The fullscreen I.D. 

Over hall U.S. stations agree to take new 
form of I.I), which saves clients nionev 



New full-screen ID. Format proposed In the Station Representatives 

Association had been accepted l>\ 250 stations at sponsor's 

presstime. Stations, listed at right, will also take the older 

three-quarter screen I.I), sponsor publishes the li>t for convenience of 

those planning I.I), campaigns. It includes names of 

representatives. I.D. rates. The new I.I), saves advertisers $50 

and up per station used because it eliminates need for imprinting 

station call letters on every I.D. sent out. SRA told sponsor 

one major client spent $300,000 last year for I.D. imprints 

alone. SRA believes the full-screen format will lead to 

in. rea-ed u-c of I.D. s. particularlv in daytime. And more stations 

are expected I" approve the format. Shown below are standards 

for the new as well as the older three-quarter screen I.D. 




These are | ol 

[list is alphabetical 



K ARK-TV Little Rock, Ark.—Petn $35 
KBAK-TV Bakersfield, (al.— For joe TV $23.50 
KBET-TV Sacramento Due on air 15 Feb. 

KBOI-TV Meridian, Idaho— Free & Peters $75 

KBTV Denver— Free & Peters $45 

KCEN-TV Temple, Tex.—Hollingbery... $20 

KCJB-TV Minot, V. I). -Weed TV J. $75 
KCMC-TV Texarkana, Tex. Venard, 

Kinioul & McConnell $20 

KCMO-TV Kansas Cit) — Katz .... $75 
KCOP-TV Los Angeles- Katz $87.50 

KCSJ-TV Pueblo, Colo.— Avery. -KnodeL... $18 

KDUB-TV Lubbock, Tex. Avery-Knodel $25 

KELO-TV Sioux Falls, S.D. Raymer $30 

KENS-TV San intonio—Free & Peters... $55 

KERO-TV Bakersfield. Cal. Avery-Knodel $30 
KFBB-TV Great Fa/Is. Mont.—Headley-Reed $75 

KFBC-TV Cheyenne, Wyo.—Hollingbery $75 

KFDA-TV Amarillo, Tex.— Branham— $25 

KFDX-TV Wichita Falls, Tex.—Raymer $30 
KFIA In, horage, ilaska 

Weed, Moore & Lund $75 

KFSA-TV Fort Smith, Ark. Pearson T\ $75 

KFSD-TV Sun Diego— Katz... $50 

KFXJ-TV Grand Junction, Colo. -Hoi man $72 

KGBT-TV Harlingen, Tex. H-R TV ... $20 

KGLO-TV Mason City, Iowa— Weed TV $20 

KGNC-TV Amarillo, Tex.— Katz.- $25 

KGUL-TV Galveston CBS Spot Sales $75 



KGVO-TV Missoula, Mont. Gill-Perna 
KHJ-TV Los Angeles— H-R 1 1 
KHOL-TV Kearney, \eb. Meekei Tl 
KHQ-TV Spokane Katz 
KIDO-TV Boise, Idaho Hoag-Blair 
KIEM-TV Eureka, Cal.— Hoag-Blair 
KING-TV Seattle Blair Tl 
KIVA-TV ) uma, Ariz. If . S. Grant.... 
KJEO-TV Fresno, Cal. Branham 
KLAS-TV Las Vegas— Weed TV '._ 
KLZ-TV Denver— Katz ... 
KMBC-TV Kansas Cit) Free & Peters... 
KMMT-TV Austin, Minn.— Pearson TV. 
KNOE-TV Monroe, La. H-R TV— _ 



$75 
$60 
$75 
$50 
$75 
$75 
$70 
$20 
$35 
$20 
$60 
$90 
$18 
$30 

KOAM-TV Pittsburg, Kan.— Katz $20 

KOAT-TV ilbuquerque, \ .M.-Hollingbery $10 
KOB-TV Albuquerque, \.l/. Branham- $25 
KOIN-TV Portland, Ore. (IIS Spot Sales $75 

KOLN-TV Lincoln tvery-Knodel _, $25 

KOMO Seat tie Hollingber) $80 

KOMU-TV Columbia, Mo. -H-R Tl $20 

KONA Honolulu Hawaii SBC Spot Sales $30 



KOTV Tulsa. Okla. Petri 
KPHO-TV Phoenh katz 
KPIX Sun Francisco Katz 
KPRC-TV Houston Pefrj 



$75 
$45 

$730 
$75 
$60 
$75 

$250 

$35 

$87.50 

$20 



KPTV Portland, Ore. \ IH Spot Sales 
KQTV Fort Dodge, Iowa Pearson Tl 
KRCA Los tngeles \B( Spot Sales 
KREM-TV Spokane Petrj 
KRLD-TV Dallas Branham 
KROC-TV Rochester, Minn. Meekei 
KROD-TV II Paso, Tex. Branham $37.50 

KRON-TV s,m Francisco Free & Peters $735 
KSAN-TV San Francisco McGillvra $10 

KSD-TV St. Louis SB( Spot Sales $100 

KSL-TV Suit Lake Cit) < IIS Spot Sales $75 
KSLA Shreveport, La. Ray met $30 

KSV/O-TV Lawton, Okla Pearson Tl $75 

... i 3RUS rotiuli 10 Ja 



tions which told SRA they would accept the new full screen I.D. 

letters, includes representative and Class "A" or ".1.1" one-time I.D. rate i 



KTAG Lake (hurl,-,. La. Young II $12.50 
KTBC-TV Austin, Tex.—Raymer $30 

KTIV Sioux City, lowa—Hollingbery $25 

KTLA Hollywood— Raymer _ $115 

KTNT-TV Tacoma—Weed T) $60 

KTSM-TV El Paso—Hollingbery... $25 

KTTS-TV Springfield, Mo.— Weed TV $20 

KTVA Anchorage, Alaska — Feltis & Assoc. $15 
KTVH Hutchinson. Kan. HR T) $50 

KTVT Salt Lake City Blair TV $50 

KTVU Stockton, Cal. Ihdlingbery .... $37.50 
KTVW Tacoma, Wash. — Clark; Christiansen; 

Barry $42.50 

KULA-TV Honolulu. Hawaii— Young TV.. $25 
KVDO-TV Corpus Christi. Tex.— Young TV $15 
KVEC-TV Sun Luis Obispo, Cal.— Grant . $15 
KVOS-TV Bellingham, Wash.—Forjoe TV. $9 
KVTV Sioux City, Iowa- Katz $30 

KWK-TV St. Louis, Mo.— Katz $100 

KWTV Oklahoma City, Okla.— Avery-Knodel $60 
KXLF-TV Butte, Mont.— Walker, Pacific $5 

KXLY-TV Spokane, Wash. — Avery-Knodel, 

Walker. Pacific .. $40 

KZTV Reno, Nev.— Pearson TV.. $22.50 

W ABC-TV New York, N.Y.—Weed TV $350 
WABI-TV Bangor, Me.—Hollingbery $25 

WABT Birmingham— Blair TV... $70 

WACH-TV Newport News, Va.— 

Walker Repr _ $72.60 

WAGA-TV Atlanta— Katz $68 

W AIM-TV Anderson, S.C.—Headley-Reed $25 
WATE-TV Knoxville— Avery-Knodel $30 

WAVE-TV Louisville NBC Spot Sales $85 

WBAP-TV Fort Worth— Free & Peters .... $80 
WBKB Chicago Blair T) $160 

WBNS-TV Columbus -Blair TV $60 

WBRC-TV Birmingham— Katz .. $64 

WBRE-TV Wakes-Bane, Pa.— Headley-Reed $35 
WBTM-TV Danville, Va.—Gill-Perna $15 

WBTV Charlotte— CBS Spot Sales $105 

WBTW Florence, S. (.. CHS Spot Sales $30 

WBZ-TV Boston Free & Peters ... $200 

WCAU-TV Philadelphia— CBS Spot Sales $250 
V/CCO-TV Minneapolis. Minn. 

Free & Peters ... $110 
WCHS-TV Charleston, W. Va.—Branham $62 50 

WCIA-TV Champaign, Ill.—Hollingbery $45 

WCOS-TV Columbia, S.C.—Headley-Reed $20 

WCOV-TV Montgomery, Ala. Raymer $20 

WCPO-TV Cincinnati Branham $50 

WCSC-TV Charleston— Free & Peters $30 

WCSH-TV Portland. Me.— Weed TV $30 
WDAF-TV Kansas City — Harrington, 

Righter & Parsons $86 

WDAK-TV Columbus, Ga.- Headley-Reed $25 

WDEL-TV Wilmington, Del— Meeker TV $50 

WDSM-TV Superior, Wis.— Free & Peters $25 

WEAU-TV Fan Claire, Wis.—Hollingbery $15 

WEEK-TV Peoria, III.— Headley-Reed $40 

WEWS (Iceland— Branham $100 

WFAA-TV Dallas Petry $80 

WFAM-TV Lafayette, Ind. —Rambeau . $20 

WFBC-TV Greenville. S. C. 11 col T I $50 

WFBG-TV Altoona, Pa.—H-R TV $50 

WFBM-TV Indianapolis. Ind.— Katz ... $90 
WFIE Evansville, Ind. Venard, Rintoul 

& McConnell $25 

24 JANUARY 1955 



WFIL-TV Philadelphia— Katz $375 

WFMJ-TV Youngstown, Ohio— Headley-Reed $35 
WGAL-TV Lancaster, Pa.— Meeker TV $90 

WGAN-TV Portland. Me, Avery-Knodel $25 
WGBI-TV Scranton, Pa. Blair TV ... $30 

WGEM-TV Quincy, III. Avery-Knodel $25 

WGR-TV Bulla! o Headley-Reed .. $70 

WHAM-TV Rochester— Hollingba \ $40 

WHBF-TV Rock Island, III.— Avery-Knodel $70 
WHBQ-TV Memphis -Blair TV.. $62.50 

WHEC-TV Rochester— Everett-McKinney $50 
WHEN-TV Syracuse— Katz $60 

WHIZ-TV Zanesville, Ohio— Pearson TV... $75 
WHO-TV Des Moines— Free & Peters $55 

WHUM-TV Reading, Pa.—H-R TV $30 

WHYN-TV Springfield, Mass.— Branham $30 
WIBW-TV Topeka— Capper $40 

WICC-TV Bridgeport Young TV $20 

WICU Erie. Pa.— Petry ... $70 

WILK-TV WUkes-Barre, Pa.— Avery-Knodel $20 
WIN-T Fort Wayne, Ind.—H-R TV $30 

WINK-TV Fort Meyers, Fla.—Weed TV $75 
WIRK-TV W. Palm Beach, Fla.—Weed TV $75 
WIS-TV Columbia, S.C.—Free & Peters $43.75 
WISE-TV isheville, N.C.— Boiling $75 

WJAC-TV Johnstown, Pa.— Katz $68 

WJAR-TV Providence— Weed TV $90 

WJBF-TV Augusta, Ga.—Hollingbery. $25 

WJBK-TV Detroit— Katz $760 

WJHL-TV Johnson City, Tenn.— Pearson TV $25 
W JIM-TV Lansing, Mich.— Petry $70 

WJNO-TV II . Palm Beach-Meeker TV $30 
WJTV Jackson, Miss.— Katz $20 

WKBT La Crosse, Wis.— Raymer $20 

WKJG-TV Fort Wayne, Ind.— Raymer ... $30 
WKNA-TV Charleston. W. Va, Weed TV $35 
WKNY-TV Kingston, N. Y.— Meeker TV $10 
WKOW-TV Madison Headley-Reed $25 

WKRC-TV Cincinanti—Katz $60 

WKST-TV Xeu Castle. Pa.— 

Everett-McKinney $20 

WKTV I tica. N. Y.— Cooke $30 

WKY-TV Oklahoma City— Katz... $75 

WKZO-TV Kalamazoo. M i,h.— Avery-Knodel $75 
WLAC-TV SashvUle Katz $50 

WLAM-TV l.eiciston. Me.— 

Everett- Mi Kinney $ 7 2 

WLBC-TV Muncie, Ind.— Waller $22.50 

WLBT Jackson, Wiss.—Hollingber) $20 

WLVA-TV Lynchburg, Va.—Hollingbery. $25 
WLW-C Columbus— Crosley. Mil Spot Sales $40 
WLW-D Dayton— Crosley, NBC Spot Sales $40 
WLW-T Cincinnati— Crosley, NBC Spot Sales $50 
WMAL-TV Washington, D.C.—Katz $50 

WMAR-TV Baltimore Katz $80 

WMBR-TV Jacksonville, Fla. 

CBS Spot Sales $70 

WMBV-TV Marinette. Wis— Vernai d. 
Rintoul & McConnell $20 

WMCT Memphis Branham $62.50 

WMGT Pittsfield Mass. Halle, $20 

WMIN-TV Minneapolis— Blair TV $75 

WMSL-TV Decatur, Ala.— Wall, a $20 

WMT-TV ( eda, Rapids Katz $40 

WMTV Madison Boiling $20 

WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H. It colli $18.75 



WMVT Montpelier, Vt.—Weed II $25 

WNBF-TV Binghainton. V Y .—Boiling .. $60 

WNBK Cleveland V BC Spot Sales ... $185 

WNBQ Chicago VBt Spot Sales $275 

WNET I'm, i.lon e Blair TV $20 

WHEX-TV Maoai. Ga.— Branham ... $75 

WNHC-TV \cic Haven— Katz.. $80 

WOAI-TV San Antonio -Petry $55 

WOAY-TV Oak Hill, W. Va.—Weed TV $35 

WOC-TV Davenport— Free & Peters $70 

WOI-TV Ames, Iowa— Weed TV— $50 

WOOD-TV Grand Rapids— Katz.-. $75 

WOW-TV Omaha— Blair TV $60 
WPAG-TV Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Everett-McKinney $15 

WPTZ Philadelphia, Pa.— Free & Peters $250 

WRBL-TV Columbus, Ga.—Hollingbery $25 
WRC-TV Washington, D.C.— 

NBC Spot Sales $735 

WRCA-TV Sew York— NBC Spot Sales $815 

WREX-TV Rockford, Ill.—H-R TV $40 

WRGB Schenectady— NBC Spot Sales $82.50 

WROW-TV Albany Boiling $25 

WSAU-TV Wausau, Wis.— Meeker TV . $20 

WSAZ-TV Huntington, W. Va.—Katz- $70 

WSBA-TV York. Pa.— Young TV $20 

WSBT-TV South Bend— Raymer $30 

WSEE-TV Erie, Pa.— Avery-Knodel $20 

WSIX-TV Nashville— HoUingben $ 40 
WSJS-TV Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Headley-Reed $45 

WSJV-TV Elkhart, Ind.—H-R TV $25 

WSLI-TV Jackson. Miss.— Weed TV $20 

WSLS-TV Roanoke, Va.— Avery-Knodel $50 

WSM-TV Nashville— Petty $55 

WSPD-TV Toledo— Katz $85 
WSTV-TV Steubenville, Ohio ivery-Knodel $40 

WSUN-TV St. Petersburg II eed Tl $32.50 

WSVA-TV Harrisonburg, Va.— Pearson Tl $75 

WTAP Parkersburg, W. Va.— For joe TV $72.50 

WTCN-TV Minneapolis— Blair TV $75 

WTOB-TV Winston -Salem, N. C.—H-R TV $20 

WTOP-TV Washington. I). < . 

( US Spot Sales $'25 

WTRF-TV Wheeling, W. Va.—Hollingbery $40 

WTSK-TV Knoxville Pearson TV.. $25 

WTTG Washington, D. C— Blair TV $50 

WTTV Bloomington. Ind. Meeker TV $75 



WTVD Durham. N. C. Headley-Reed 
WTVH-TV Peoria. III. Petry 
WTVI Belleville. III. Radio-TV Repr 
WTVJ Miami In, & Peters. 
WTVN-TV Columbus— Katz 
WTVO Rockford, III. Weed H 
WTVP Decatur. 111. Boiling 



$30 
$35 
$25 
$90 
$40 
$50 
$30 

WTVR Richmond. I a. Blair I I $70 

WUSN-TV Charleston, S.C. H-R TV, tyers $30 

WVEC-TV Hamilton. I a. Rambeau $30 

WVET-TV Rochester- Boiling $50 

WW J-TV Detroit Hollingber) $' 28 

WWLP Springfield, Mass. Ho $30 

WWOR-TV II or, ester. Mass. Raymer $25 

WWTV Cadillac, Mich. Weed TV $20 

WXEL (lei eland Katz $100 

WXYZ-TV Detroit Blair TV $7 25 



49 




RADIO DREW CROWDS TO OPENING OF FOURTH FELD BROS. SUPER MUSIC STORE. SHOWN ABOVE: IRVIN AND ISRAEL FELD 

The record stores radio built 



Washington. 1ft. C Super Ylusie Stores get ''immediate results" on radio 



J n l')'.)') In in ami Israel Feld opened 
a small neighborhood drug store in 
downtown Washington. D. C. Three 
vears later, the Felds bought their 
first radio show over WW DC. 

During the past I I years on the air. 
the Felds have parlayed their one small 
store into a many-faceted, $2 million- 
plus operation. Today. Feld enter- 
prise- include the original drug store 
which now sells records as well and: 

• Three large record stores, which 
also stock phonographs and appliances 
and double as ticket agencies. 

• A music and theatrical enterprise 
booking entertainment from classical 
drama to spiritual concerts. 

• An interest in a recording busi- 
ness. 

• \ record suppl) service for juke- 
box operators which includes records 

of all labels. 

To link its sprawling enterprises i"- 
gelher, all Feld operations include the 



word "Super" in their titles. The mu- 
sic stores, for example, are called "Su- 
per Mu-ic Stores." The summer enter- 
tainment series. "Super Presentations." 
The spirituals, "Super Spiritual Con- 
certs.'" And so on. 

The Feld brothers spend about $65.- 
000 -or, some 65' < of their total 
budget— for radio today. More than 
half the air appropriation goes for 
some eight hours a week of varied 
music programing on WW DC. Uso 



mi the schedule are Negro d.j. shows 
on WOOK. another W ashingtoa sta- 
tion, and community events programs 
on WCAY. Silver Spring Md. Agen- 
c\ is Azrael Advertising. Baltimore. 

"Radio is a natural for our type of 
operation," In in Feld told sponsor. 
"With a relativel) small budget, we 
get immediate sales results. And ra- 
dio, more than any other medium, has 
the kind of flexibility we depend on. 
i Please turn to page 82 I 



PROMOTION MINDED: WWDC d.j. Jon Massey awards money for lucky bills; stores gave 
away snow balls in August to hypo ice show Felds promoted. Brothers stage concerts as well 



case history 




50 



SPONSOR 



WKRC-TV 



316,000 watts 

on Channel 12 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 




WTVN-TV 



100,000 watts 

on Channel 6 columbus, ohio 



Don Chapin 

Mgr. New York Office, 

550 Fifth Avenue 



Ken Church 

National Sales Manager 



REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 



24 JANUARY 1955 



51 




/ A new syndicated TV series 




ne Lockhart 

ONOR, HOMER BELL" 







You feel its heartwarming humanity and enjoy its 
happy twists of plot. And no one in all the world of 
the theatre so captures that "feel of America'", makes 
it live so lovably, so genially, so memorably as Gene 
Lockhart. 

Through 39 half hour episodes, he lives to the full 
the home and professional life of a fine engaging man. 
And he creates a warm response for your name and 
your product. 

NBC FILM DIVISION 

SERVING ALL SPONSORS . . . SERVING All STATIONS 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, N. Y. 20 

Merchandise Mart, Chicago, III. • Sunset & Vine Sts., Hollywood, Calif. 

In Canada: RCA Victor, 225 Mutual St., Toronto; 1551 Bishop St., Montreal 



Storer 

Broadcasting 

Company 



announces tJie appointment of 




as national representative for 



WGBS-TV 



Miami, Florida 



NBC for Southeast Florida 



* 



41IIJI 


Nil 


14 


JULY TO 


"'•SI 


lr si* <uhI I141 1 ) . volume // 


DECEMBER 
19 5 4 


UI UllLFUJ 


LI 


Issued every 6 months 



1 </»•«• ri is iiiif If/riMM-s 

Stanle) \. Lomas, William Esty, profile 12 July p. 66 

B&B's time buying approach 26 July p. 36 

Fear in admen's selection of media 26 July p. 31 

Robert Orr, On & Associates, profile 26 July p. 68 

The all-media buyer (Y&R) 9 Aug. p. 34 

William Mil l\ a in. Leo Burnett, profile 9 Aug. p. 64 

Everett W. Hoyt, Chas. \\ . Hoyt, profile 23 Aug. p. 62 

Time buying at Fooie. (.'one & Belding 23 Aug. p. 36 

sponsor visits Virgil A. Warren, Spokane 6 Sept. p. 50 

J. B. van Urk, Calkins & Holden, profile 6 Sept. p. 73 
sponsor visits Marshall Robertson, Denver; Bo- 

zell & Jacobs, Omaha 20 Sept. p. 37 

sponsor visits Gardner \dveriising, St. Louis; 

Campbell-Ewald, Detroit 4 Oct. p. 38 

Arthur Bellaire. BBDO, profile 20 Sept. p. 81 

Nan Marquand, William. Weintraub, profile 4 Oct. p. 66 

Do agencies earn 15$ on net tv shows? _ 18 Oct. p. 29 

Louis J. Riggio, Hilton & Riggio, profile 18 Oct. p. 64 

Sy J. Froliek. Fletcher D. Richards, profile 1 Nov. p. 76 

Donald K. Clifford, DCSS, profile 15 Nov. p. 62 

Dick Bunbury, N. W. Aver, profile 29 Nov. p. 36 

Bill llinman. Lambert & Feasley, profile 29 Nov. p. 36 

Evelyn Lee Jones. Donahue & Coe, profile 29 Nov. p. 36 

Helen Wilbur. Grey, profile 29 Nov. p. 36 

John McCorkle, SSC&B, profile _ 29 Nov. p. 36 

Thomas D'Arcy Brophy, K&E, profile 29 Nov. p. 66 

1954 agency leaders in radio-tv billings 13 Dec. p. 31 

Walter Guild. Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli. profile 13 Dee. p. 66 

Thomas McDermott, Y W, Vyer, profile 27 Dec. p. 62 

Appliances 

Rotisseries on the air 26 July p. 44 

Harold H. Horton, Singer Sewing Machine, profile 15 Nov. p. 18 

How United Gas pushes trade-ins ... 15 Nov. p. 42 

Automotive and Lubricants 

Take-off on mystery shows sell- Bardahl 6 Sept. p. -18 

Why Phillips Petroleum uses -pot film _ 20 Sept. p. 42 

How Detroit auto radio repairman ups sales... 18 Oct. p. 44 

Texaco returns to big-time tv I Nov. p. 32 

Richfield co-op plan 29 Nov. p. 38 

W illiam G. Power, Chevrolet, profile _ 13 Dec. p. 28 

Auto manufacturers use radio to rouse sales 23 Aug. p. 24 

How auto ownership affects farm radio 15 Nov. p. 48 



Broadcast Ailrertising Problem 
nevelopments 

I A's seek- tu reduce objectionable ads 26 

Spot radio: bigger than you think 9 

Spanish-speaking market trends 9 

Challenge in radio sales and promotion: Foreman 23 

Spot radio development-. 9 

Where does net radio go from here? 6 

MBS president, O'Neil, expresses faith in net ra- 20 

dio's future 

Quality Radio Group pushes night radio 20 

5 big needs in spot radio 4 

1- the use of "optical-." a problem in today's film 

commercials? 4 

Spot and net radio: the line narrow- 18 

Local business shouldn't supersede national 1 

Spot radio dip: what does it mean? 1 

Advantages and disadvantages in alternate-week 

tv sponsorship 1 

Are radio-tv salesmen aggressive enough? 15 

W\F.W gets high-brow sponsors 29 

I "sing tv to plug record-: Csida 13 



s and 



Julv 


P- 


27 


Vug. 


P- 


31 


Vug. 


p. 


26 


Vug. 


P- 


10 


Vug. 


P- 


68 


Sept. 


P- 


44 


Sept. 


P- 


24 


Sept. 


P. 


40 


Oct. 


P- 


29 


Oct. 


p. 


60 


Oct. 


P- 


34 


Nov. 


P- 


21 


Nov. 


P- 


29 


Nov. 


P- 


90 


Nov. 


P- 


36 


Nov. 


P- 


68 


Dec. 


P- 


24 



9 Aug. 


P- 


24 


9 Aug. 


P- 


37 


4 Oct. 


P- 


37 


IHO.-t. 


P- 


36 



Clothing and Accessories 

lleibeit I ■ i d-. Kxcpii-ite Form, profile 

Radio 1 sts sales for Phoenix dress shop 

Sweet-orr's tug ol war trademark on l\ 
I xquisite Form brassieres on the ail 



Commercials and Sales .ticf.v 

Tv demand- more ol testimonials: Foreman 12 July p. 20 

How to create successful "playback" commer- 
cials: Foreman 26 July p. 10 



Pilot film is necessarj to make a sale: Foreman 
10 ways for more sell in tv commercials ... 
Spot radio'- creative salesmen dig deep for facts.. 
Tips on showing your product to best advantage 
on tv (special section of sponsor's Tv Dic- 
tionary) 
I- radio i "P> today'- agency stepchild'.'' 
1- it pom taste to make a singing commercial out 

of a well-known public domain tune? . 
"Life" vs. tv: media test 
Film show talent for commercials . 
Can program mood affect sales reception? 
Should film '"roughs" replace storyboards? . 
Sponsors as salesmen on radio and tv 
Do's and don'ts of tv commercials 
For more effective color tv commercials 
Tip- on money-saving, eye-catching t\ special ef- 
fects 
Admen name favorite commercials 
Dramatics with color tv ads: Foreman 
Natl Research Bureau produce- monthly digests 
of successful sales ideas 



9 Aug. p. 10 

26 July p. 40 

6 Sept. p. 56 

<i Sept. p. 54 



20 Sept. p. 31 



18 Oct. 


P- 


62 


18 Oct. 


P- 


40 


1 Nov. 


P- 


36 


15 Nov. 


P- 


64 


29 Nov. 


P- 


42 


29 Nov. 


P- 


70 


13 Dec. 


P- 


36 


13 Dec. 


P- 


52 


15 Nov. 


P- 


48 


27 Dec. 


p. 


38 


29 Nov. 


P- 


11 



27 Dee. p. 68 



P- 


39 


p. 


42 


p- 


8 


p- 


10 



P- 


42 


P- 


24 


P- 


42 


P- 


34 


!'• 


26 


P- 


32 


P- 


36 



Costs 

Net tv -liovv costs: why they rose '> Sept. 

Net radio -how costs 1 Oct. 

Extravagant tv spending: Foreman 18 Oct. 

Dollar diplomacy in tv advertising: Foreman 27 Dec. 

Drugs ami Cosmetics 

Whv Wildroot has 100 ad budgets 12 July 

Albert Plant. Dorothy Gray, profile 26 July 

Doeskin tis-ucs plugged on air 9 Aug. 

SSS tonic uses spot radio 23 Aug. 

Kirk Le Mayne, Emerson Drug, profile 23 Aug. 

666 Cold Tablets ups use of radio 18 Oct. 

Why Block Drug likes radio and tv 27 Dec. 



I all Facts: 1951 

Fall radio-tv advertising trends 12 July p. 56 

Spot tv reporl 12 July p. 73 

Net tv report 12 Julv p. 117 

Tv basics _ 12 July p. 159 

Film basics 12 July p. 183 

Spot radio report 12 July p. 195 

Radio basics 12 July p. 229 

Nit radio report 12 July p. 251 

Farm Kadio and Tr 

Farm radio and tv : 1954 I Nov. p. 41 

Farm market I Nov. p. !_' 

Listening, viewing greatei on farm- 1 Nov. p. 44 

Radio-tv farm director, profile 1 Nov. p. -16 

Vnalysis of farm market, 1955 I Nov. p. 52 

Farm radio and t\ results I Nov. p. "if 

VutO ownership: rural v-. farm 15 Nov. p. 48 

Centra] Iowa farmers have as man) tv sets as cit> 

dwellers, survey reveals 27Dec. p. 52 



24 JANUARY 1955 



55 



Footls «n«l Beverages 

Henrj A. Markus, W ine Corp. of Vmerica, profile 12 July 

Dannon yogurt's success with air media 23 Aug. 

Hotel Bar hotter switches to radio 6 v ' [it. 

Maxwell House uses net tv and spot radio I Oct. 

Goebel Brewing Co. uses i\ puppi 15 Nov. 

Donald Cady, Nestle Co., profile 29 Nov. 

[mportei S.S. Pierce reaches epicures with radio 29 Nov. 

Continental Baking: radio for mom, tv for jr. 13 Dec. 

Ronzoni Macaroni tips sales with radio-tv 13 Dec. 

Willis II. Gurley, Borden F I Products, profile 27 Dec. 

Bettj Crocket and net radio 27 Dec. 

Foreign find International 

Canadian radio and tv: 19.") 1 23 \iin. 
Canadian market: similarities, differences 23 Vug. 
Canadian radio: getting read) for tv 23 Aug. 
Canadian tv: commercial time sold out 23 Vug. 
Selling, programing, promotion 23 Vug. 
Radio stations, reps, rates: a listing 23 Vug. 
Will Canadian radio have same problems compet- 
ing vs. t\ as I - 23 Vug. 
First commercial tv station open- in French 

Morocco 26 Jul) 
Growth of radio in Canada subject ol new book 

"The Listening Million-" 18 Oct. 

tnsantnee and Finance 

Network radio promotes Stale Farm name 26.lul\ 

Henry M. Kennedy, Prudential, profile 1 Nov. 



30 
40 
46 
32 

Id 
22 

11 

;i 



p. n 

p. 21 
p. 34 



rliscellaneons I'roiluets and Services 



Tv I.D. boosts sales for Cincinnati coal compan) 20 Sept. 

Russell Klemm Jr.. Marcalus Mfg.. profile 20 Sept. 

Saran Wrap's t\ success stor) ..... 20 Sept. 

Dominick O'Connor, \air Window, profile 4 Oct. 

Ralph Danziger, To) Guidance Council, profile 18 Oct. 

Int'l Nickel uses spol radio for p.r. I \o\. 

Industrial corporations use air media for p.r. 13 Dec. 

\egro Katlio Section 

Negro Radio Section 20 Sept. 

Negro radio comes of age _ 20 Sept. 

Step-by-step analysis 20 Sept. 

Vjio radio results 20 Sept. 

National Negro Network 20 Sept. 

Tips on selling via Negro radio 20 Sepl. 

radio's talent 20 Sept. 

Negro radio lisilng 20 Sept. 

Programing 

Fall program trend- in nel tv 23 Aug. 

What il the star of a program can't appear'.'' 20 Sepi. 

Bardahl oil uses mystery-show take-off 6 Sept. 

Tv to combat juvenile delinquency: Csida tOct. 

Net tv participation -how- offer flexibility 29 Nov. 

Research 

Highlights of sponsor's Vll-Media Stud) 12 July 

Fall radio-tv advertising trends 12 July 
Nielsen places contracts to install first 6.000 

Recordimeters 20 Sept. 

Schwerin's new commercial testing technique 1 Oct. 

Pinpointing the audience: Mils study shows how I Oct. 

Ohio State studies program preference- 18 Oct. 

"Fife" \-. t\ : media test 18 Oct. 

The spectaculars: an interim report 15 Nov. 

VR1 radio-tv set counts, locations 15Nov. 

The ratings muddle J 1 ) Nov. 

What timebuyers want in radio-tv ids 13 Dec. 

Year-end report on radio and t\ 27 Dee. 

Wlin clients, a e's want in radio-iv ads 27 Dec. 

T\ up- sports attendance, Omaha stud) -how- 29 Nov. 

How to interpret ratings: Foreman L5Nov. 
il Iowa farmers have as man) i\ sets as 

■ lis dwi IN i -. -hi ve) reveals 27 I lei , 
Natl Research Bureau produces month!) dig< I 

Fu] sales idi 27 Dec. 



76 
76 
78 
80 
82 
84 

66 

26 

49 



34 

16 



86 
28 
34 
20 
26 
34 



17 
IS 
50 
52 

54 



p. 137 
I». 139 



3] 
78 
18 
26 

in 



1 1. 38 

p. 56 

p. 81 

p. 34 

p. I' 

p. 38 

p. 1(1 

p. ."i 

p. :i 

P . ::i 

p. 12 

I) 29 

p. 40 

P. 62 

p. I I 

p. 52 

n 68 



Retail 

Vlbuquerque food chain battles giants with radio 
Sacramento department store tests radio 
Jerome K. Ohrhach. Ohrbach's, profile 
Gimbel's launches new spot radio drive on WVCBS 
Gimbels reupholstery uses air to double business 

Soaps and Cleaners 

Glamorene rug (leaner on net radio 
Tv worked for drive-in launch \ 



26julv 


P- 


39 


9 Aug. 


P- 


44 


6 Sept. 


P- 


24 


20 Sept. 


P- 


81 


29 Nov. 


P- 


34 


r. Nov. 


P- 


32 


27 Dec. 


P- 


44 



6 Sept. 


P- 


36 


29 Nov. 


P- 


62 


26 July 


P- 


12 


9 Aug. 


P- 


46 


23 Aug. 


P- 


39 


20 Si pt. 


!'• 


24 


1 Oct. 


P- 


15 


1 Nov. 


P- 


Id 


15 Nov. 


P. 


38 


15 Nov. 


P- 


66 


29 Nov. 


P- 


40 


29 Nov. 


P- 


26 


27 Dec. 


P- 


16 


13 Dec. 


P- 


10 


27 Dee. 


P- 


66 



Sports 

Mages Stores for Sport uses 2/3 of budget for tv 

T\ up- sports attendance. Omaha study shows 

Television 

How well can uhf sell? 

Some facts ahout uhf 

TvB: new fact source for admen . 

Ratings for NBC TV's fir-i "spec" disappointing 

Failures and successes of tv newscasts: Foreman 

Audio-slovenliness: Foreman 

Shep Mead. B&B, looks at tv in 1992 

lips on color shows 

Net t\ participation -how-: flexible 

Can a mediocre show hold audiences?: Csida... 

Today's talent are business-minded: Csida 

Children ;:ood judges of commercials: Foreman 

Do radio and tv need a better system of award-? 

Television Film 

Syndicated films for local and regional sponsors 



SPONSOR-TelePulse rating- of top spot film shows 



Tv film -how- recentl) made available for syndi- 
cation 



Advantages in using syndicated films in multiple- 
market buys 
Tv film needs trade group: Csida 
Successes of tv film: Csida 
How to use multi-market film shows 



Time Raging 

Spol radio: bigger (ban you think 9 Vug. p. 

Dick Bunbury. N. W. Ayer. profile 29 Nov. p. 

Bill Hinman, Lambert & Feasley, profile 29 Nov. p. 

Evelyn Lee Jones. Donahue & Coe, profile ... 29 Nov. p. 

Helen Wilbur. Grey, profile 29 Nov. p. 

John McCorkle, SSC&B, profile 29 Nov. p. 

Tv Rictionarg Handbook for Sponsors 

Part I < \-C) . 9 Vug. p. 

Part II (D-F) 23 Vug. p. 

Part 111 i IK ) 6 Sept. p. 

Part 1\ (K Mi 20 Sept. p. 

Part V (M-O) 1 Oct. p. 

Pan VI (0 P) loOvi. p. 

Part Ml (P-S) I Nov. p. 

Part Mil (S) 15 Nov. p. 

Part IX (S-T) 29 Nov. p. 

( oloi 9i i tion 29 Nov. p. 

Cartoons inspired b) the Dictionar) .'''Nov. p. 

Pa,. \ i I /i I I Dee. p. 



Bayuk cigar- increases sales 12' , with nel iv 



26 Jul) 


P- 


Of. 


12 July 


P- 


52 


9 Aug. 


P- 


56 


6 Sept. 


P- 


60 


1 Oct. 


P- 


52 


1 Nov. 


P- 


74 


29 Nov. 


P- 


58 


27 Dec. 


P- 


50 


26 July 


P- 


51 


23 Vug. 


P- 


50 


20 Sept. 


P- 


66 


18 Oct. 


P. 


54 


15 Nov. 


P. 


52 


13 Dec. 


P- 


56 


6 Si pt. 


P- 


68 


20 Sept. 


P. 


19 


18 Oct. 


P- 


11 


27 Dee. 


P. 


42 



31 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 



38 
12 
.".2 
14 
40 
12 
38 
II 
45 
17 
18 
18 



21 Dei . p. 52 



BINDERS accommodating a six-month supply of issues, $4.00 each; two for $7.00 
BOUND VOLUMES (two volumes) per year, $15.00 



56 



SPONSOR 




♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ nation, s 
most oatstanainff, 




Jack Jackson, Director of Agriculture for KCMO adds 
another laurel to his impressive list of achievements. 
The American Farm Bureau Federation has named 
Jack as the nation's "Radio Farm Editor doing the 
most outstanding work in interpreting agriculture to 
the American public in 1954 ..." 



Intelligent handling of his responsibilities as KCMO's Director of Agriculture 
has brought Jack . . . and the station . . . national recognition. And many 
important sponsors recognize that this exceptional quality in KCMO's farm 
broadcasting and telecasting under Jack's direction, is an important part of 
their selling plans. 

To reach more of rural Mid-America with the greatest impact, let an expert in 
the field tell your sales story via KCMO-Radio and KCMO-Television. Call today 
for further information. 




TV-Channel 5 
Radio-810 kc. 



Affiliated with Meredith Publishing Company— Publishers of Better Homes and Gardens. ..and Successful Farming 

KCMO Broadcasting Co., 125 E. 31st St., Kansas City, Mo. — The Katz Agency, Rep. 



24 JANUARY 1955 



57 



I 



Put* 

rank 



1 


I 


2 


5 


3 


2 


3 


3 


5 


e 


6 


8 


7 




1 
« 1 

1 


9 


7 



10 



Rank 
now 




( 



1 



.1 WI WIWj I 



m 



mm ETSL 



ij 



up ii imp q 



Chart covers half-hour syndicated film pro >i 




Top 70 shows in 10 or more markets 
Period 1-7 December 19S4 

TITLE. SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER. SHOW TYPE 



I Led Three Lives, Ziv |D) 



Liberaee, Guild Films (Mu. 



Badge 714, NBC Film (D) 



Mr. District Attorney, Ziv (A) 



City Detective, MCA, Revue Prod. (D) 



Superman, Flamingo, R. Maxwell (K) 



IimiiV Oakley, CBS Film, Flying A (W) 



Kit* Carson, MCA, Revue Prod. (W) 



Favorite Story, Ziv (D) 



Cisco Kid, Ziv (W) 



Average 
rating 



22.0 



20.3 



lit. 



19.7 



19.5 



I?>. I 



17.3 



I7.I 



16.8 



16.5 



7-STAT10N 
MARKETS 



N.Y. 


L.A. 


6.7 


12.1 




kttv 
8:30pm 


4.8 


7.0 


wpix 
6:30pm 


kcop 
7 :30pm 


8.2 


7 7.8 


wor-tv 
9:00pm 


kttv 
7 30pm 


6.9 


77.3 


wabc-tv 
[0 30pm 


knxt 
10:00pm 



8.7 70.5 



wplx 

9:30pm 



knxt 



72.8 73.5 



m . a iv 
6 :00pm 



kttv 
00pm 



2.8 76.7 



wabd 

8 in 



kttv 
7 mipm 



7.3 7.9 



n n .i f i 

6 in 



kttv 
; :30pm 



5.2 7.8 



wor-tv 

9 :0pm 



kttv 
8 00pm 



9.7 9.3 



wrca-tv 
0:00pm 



kttv 
:30pm 



5-STA- 
TION 
MAR- 
KETS 



S. Fran. 



78.5 

kron-tv 



28.8 

kpix 

37.8 

kpix 



22.5 

kron-tv 
I" 30pm 



75.8 

kron-tv 
10:00pm 



79.5 

kgo-tv 

6 30pm 



72.5 

kgo-tv 
6 30pm 



22.3 

kron-tv 
4 :00pm 



70.3 







77.5 

kron-tv 
5:00pm 



4-STATION MARKETS 



Boston Chi. Detroit Mlwkee. Mols. Seattle Wash. 



25.0 75.9 73.5 74.0 28.5 72.3 75.8 






(vgn-tv 

9 :30pm 



tvjbk-tv 
10:30pm 



wtmj-tv 
10:30pm 



ktnt-tv 
9:30pm 1" m 



w re-tv 
10:30pm 



75.8 72.2 8.8 37.3 76.5 22.0 8.5 



Svbz-tV 
3 :00pm 



wgn-tv 
9 :30pm 



wwj-tv 
6:30pm 



wtmj-tv 
8:00pm 



weeo-tv klng-tv 
7:00pm - 



wttg 

9:00pm 



75.5 75.5 79.3 72.3 24.8 28.3 20.9 



wnae-tv 
6:30pm 



wgn-tv 

- IH1| in 



wwj-tv 
7:0Opm 



Krcan-tv 

7 im 



kstp-tv klng-tv 
9:30pm 



wre- tv 

- liopm 



27.3 7 7.2 74.8 77.7 22.8 23.3 72.0 



Hiiac tv 
10:30pm 



whkh 
9:00pm 



wwj-tv 
10:30pm 



wtmj-tv 
10:30pm 



kstp-tv klng-tv 
7:30pm 



n iii.i! tv 
10:00pm 



20.5 

wbz-tv 

10:30pm 



7.3 

cklw-tv 
7:00pm 



77.8 76.3 

weeo-tv klng-tv 
]0:15pml0:00pm 



78.3 77.9 76.3 



27.8 23.0 



vnac-tv 

; :30pm 



wbkb 
5 :00pm 



vvxyz-tv 
6:30pm 



kinc-tv 
6:00pm 



UTC-tV 

7 :00pm 



79.0 79.9 74.8 



77.3 22.3 



wliz tV 

6:00pm 



whkh 
2:00pm 



wxyz-tv 
4:30pm 



n-tcn-tv 
5:00pm 



klng-tv 

im 



79.5 

i. :00pm 



9.3 20.8 



wjbk-tv 
6:00pm 



wtmj-tv 

5:00pm 



26.3 

klng-tv 
6:00pm 



7.3 77.4 70.8 



78.3 79.8 



wjar-tv 
10:00pm 



unhi] 
9:30pm 



wjbk-tv 
7:00pm 



weeo-tv 

9 :00pm 



king tv 
8:0Opm 



74.3 23.5 75.0 77.8 



wxvz-tv 
6:30pm 



wtmj-tv 
5:30pm 



weeo-tv 
4:30pm 



komo-lv 

7 BOB '" 



3-STATION M» 



Atlanta Bait. ■ 



9.8 

wlw-a 

in ::npni 



8.5 76.5 

wlw-a wbal-tv 
8:00pm 7:00pm 



74.8 75.3 



9 :30pm 



wbal-tv 
10:30pm 



22.3 9.8 



H • 1 1 t V 



wbal-tv 
10:30prr, 



73.3 

wrnar-tv 
ll:00pn, 



79.8 20.3 



web n 
7 00pm 



nbal-tv 
7:00pm 



74.3 25.5 



6:00pm 



wbal-tv 
5 30pm 



76.0 79.3 



n En :i 
6 :00pm 



w-mar-t 
6:00pm 



75.8 

waga-tv 
7 :00pm 



73.5 27.3 



waga-tv 
I 00pm 



wbal-tv 

7:00pm 



Paif 
rank 



Top 70 shows in 4 to 9 markets 



Stories of the Century, Hollywood Tv (W) 



IH.ii 



Gene Autry, CBS Film (W) 



Tilt' Whistler. CBS Film, Joel Malone (M) 



The Falcon, NBC Film (D) 



18.2 



18.2 



17.3 



11.4 

kttv 
ft 00pm 



7.7 

kttv 

pin 



8.9 

knxt 
10:30pm 



2.8 

ki>VT-tv 
7:00pm 



22.5 

kron-tv 
in :: Hi .in 



76.3 



78.8 

vvxyz-tv 
6 :00pm 



75.8 

klng-tv 
9:30pm 



27.8 '7.6 77.3 

vvnac tv ubbm wjbk-tv 
6:30pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 



22.0 

6 :00pm 



22.8 

klng-tv 

' pm 



5.3 

cklw-tv 
10:30pm 



78.0 77.0 

klng-tv wtop-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 



74.0 

.1-1. ti 

11:00pm 



V 



10 



Inner Sanctum. NBC Film (D) 



15.2 



4.2 8.7 

wor-tv kttv 
9:00pm 



79.3 

kron tv 
7 00pm 



6.3 

cklw-tv 
10:30pm 



Doug. I (iii Intnl. \ Presents, Interstate TV (D) 



79.9 9.9 



I 1.2 



75.5 77.5 

kstp-tv l,i. ii tv 
10:15pm 



Koston Itlackie, Zi 



[Ml 



10.8 



6.5 

kttv 
8:30pm 



7.8 

kgo-tv 



73.3 9.0 70.3 



w gn tv 
9:30pm 



cklw-tv wcan-tv 
7:00pm 



50 , 

ktnt-tv ' 



Florlan Zahach, Guild Films (Mu) 



10.7 



7.9 3.3 

WD I X 



4.9 

wgn-tv 
9:00pm 



77.8 77.8 

weeo-tv king tv 
9:30pm I 



Star Showcase, Tv Progs of Amer, Sovereign (D) 



I0..1 



6.0 

kttv 



9.4 

wbbm 

9:30pm 



75.5 

kstp-tv 



7.0 

tvsb ti 



Sherlock Holmes. MPTv, Shel. Reynolds (M) 



nil 



6.4 4.4 

,n a tv ktlv 

10:00pm 



73.3 

WW,' IV 



73.8 

klng-tv 



Show typu lymboli: (A) adventure; (D) drama; (K) kids: (M) mystery; (Mn) musical: (W) 

In four or mere markets. The 
rating In an unweighted average of Individual market ratings listed above. Blan] 

t In this market 1-7 December. While network shows aro fairly 



stable from one month to another In tho markets In which they are showvi, this Is 
much lesser extent with syndicated shows. This should be borne In mind when analyzing 
trends from one month to another In this chart. 'Refers to last month't chart. If blai* 
was not rated at all In last chart or wai In other than top 10. Classification u to ■ 




3- STATION MARKETS 



Cleve. Columbus Phila. St. L. 



26.3 22.0 75.9 20.3 

wews wbns-tv wcau-tv ksd-tv 
10:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 10:00pm 



24.0 25.0 



wbns-tv 
7:00rm 



23.3 



10:00pm 



2-STATION MARKETS 



Birm. Charlotte Dayton Now. Or. 



27.5 49.8 28.5 42.5 

wabt wbtv wlilo-tv wdButv 
9:30pm 9:30pm 9:00pm 9:30pm 



27.0 



■ i.i.i 



22.0 20.8 16.7 25.8 

wnbk wlw-c wcau-tv ksd-tv 

7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 

18.8 22.3 10.2 27.3 



wews 

10:00pm 



wlw-c 
10:30pm 



wptz 
10:00pm 



kid n 

li I mi 



6.2 24.3 



will H 
7 :00pm 



ksd-tv 
9:45pm 



24.5 25.3 22.9 78.5 



wnbk 
., 00pm 



wbns-tv 
6:00pm 



wcau-tv 
7:00pm 



ksd-tv 

.: niipm 



23.8 J5.8 



wnbk 
.: 30pm 



wtvn 
6:30pm 



J 7.8 

ksd ti 

10:30pm 



2J.8 76.3 9.9 24.3 



u-iihk 
r, iiDpm 



wbns-tv 
6 :00pm 



wptz 
6 :00pm 



25.5 

wews 
9 :30pm 



ksd-tv 
5:00pm 

27.5 

ksd ti 

9 :30pm 



75.3 75.3 

wlw-c wcau-tv 
6:00pm 5:00pin 



28.5 48.0 

whlo-tv wdsu-tv 
7:30pm 9:30pm 



26.8 



23.5 

wlw-d 
7 :00pm 



22.0 55.3 27.3 24.8 



ivbrc-tv 
9:30pm 



wbtv 
8:00pm 



Klu .1 

10:30pm 



wdsu n 

in :;ii|,ii, 



76.3 56.5 



wabt 
9 :30pm 



wbtv 

> Mil,, „l 



40.3 

UtlslllV 

1 Ill 



7 7.3 

wabt 
6:00pm 



72.3 

wlw-d 

I. IMIpnl 



20.3 27.5 9.0 23.5 



wabt 
6 :00pm 



wbtv 

1:00pm 



wlw-d 

1:00pm 



wdsu-tv 
12:00pm 



7 7.8 

wlw-d 
6:00pm 



48.8 

wdsu-tv 

:i : 



28.3 

ksd-tv 
9:30pm 



20.5 

Uk tv 

1 inn 



70.8 

wtvn 
8:30pm 






76.3 

wcau-tv 
7:00pm 






7.5 76.8 



wews 
8:00pm 



wbns-tv 
7:0Opm 



77.8 

Uk Iv 
i" lOpni 



70.0 

wnbk 
10:30pm 



47.0 

wdsu-tv 
5:30pm 



40.3 

wdsu-tv 
<ii.ii, 



74.8 

wabt 
10:30pm 



42.3 

wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 



79.3 

wbrc-tv 
10:0Opm 



72.6 



1 :00pm 



oni In market Is Pulse's own. Pulse determines number by measur- 
llcn stations are actually received by homes In the metropolitan 
■ given market even though station Itself may be outside metro- 
W area of the maiket. 




&m& 



«8e#W888a«88KaHSS»** 



Operating at a maximum ERP of <\\ 
200,000 WATTS 
WKOW-TV REACHES 

100,000 TV -homes 
in ten counties having 
more than $600 million in 
retail sales 

WKOW-TV ON MARCH 1 

will raise rates only 25% 
BUT 

Advertisers starting con- 
tracts for continuous use of 
WKOW-TV will be protect- 
ed at the lower rates for 
one year. 



With complete audience domination 

AND NOW 
With greater power 




MORE THAN EVER 
WKOW-TV is 1st in Madison Television. 



ftflB BoflM BMBBBflO^tV' 



CHANNEL 27 CBS ® 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 



PLASTIC WRAP 



MOTORS. BOATS 



- 



SPONSOR: Dow Chemical AGEN< Y. MacManus, John & Vdams 

( x 1 •— l I I i \S1 HISTORY: To introduce its plastic film 
wrapping product, Saran II rap, l><>ic purchased several 

participations on kl'll 's I riend of the Family, a dail) 
daytime hall-hour woman's show, \like Davenport, star 
oj the program, offered a free sample of Saran Wrap to 
all viewers writing him and requesting it. After only 
two announcements. 1,600 written requests had poured 
into the station. Cost per participation: $60. 



KPTV, Portland, Ore. 



PROGRAM: Friend of the Family 




STEAK KNIVES 



SPONSOR: Hatfidd's Hardware 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPS I II < \-l HISTORY: Hatfield's wanted to pro- 
mote a special Grand Opening Day on a Saturday for 
Sea Horse Outboard Motors and General Marine Speed- 
liner Boats. They plugged the event on their Here's the 
Life program on KFEQ-TV, Friday, 7:30-45 p.m., and 
an additional quarter-hour program the same evening. 
During the 30 days following this promotion. $14,000 
in sales were traced directly to the shows. Cost: $228. 



KFEQ-TV, St. Joseph, Mo. 



PROGRAM: Here's the Life 



FROZEN FOOD PLAN 



SPONSOR: Pailia.nenl F I Plan 



\GENCY: Direct 



CAPS1 II i \s] HISTORY: This company sells frozen 
food plans, delivering a freezer with food to customers 
on an installment payment basis. The firm ran an an- 
nouncement campaign on l\ Ok) -II at a cost of 81.00(1 
per week. The initial campaign resulted in 40 deliveries. 
far in excess of Parliament's expectations. The lead cost 
per delivery was reduced In $35. The sponsor renewed 
for 26 weeks. 



WOKY-TV. Milwaukee 



PROGRAM : Anninincenii nl- 



CARS 



SPONSOR: Macy's Gift Shop 



\(.l N(A : Direct 



( VPSI I I < VSB HISTORY: Durum Thanksgiving week, 
\lacy s bought two participations, one in a late after- 
noon program (Harry Smith Show), one in a late eve- 
ning shou (Moonlight Playhouse), to advertise a set oj 
steal, knives priced at $4.95. For purposes of the live 
demonstration, the advertiser left nine sets at II SI \-l I . 
The dm alter the fund commercial, he came to the sta- 
tion to pick up the sds. and found they had been sold. 
From the two announcements. Macy's sold over 1,300 
sets of steal, I, m res that's $6,500 in business from an 
investment of $75. 



\\>l N-TV, St. Pelersb 



I I 



PROGRAM: Participations 



HOMES 



SPONSOR: Universal Sales & Service 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE I VSE HISTORY: One Sunday, this Meteor- 

Mercury-Lincoln dealer in Calgary, llberla. ran three 
shared I.D.'s on C.HC.I -II . The following Tuesday, the 
company reported to the station the sale of a new Lin- 
coln which they attributed directly to the three I.D.'s. 
The announcements appeared in the afternoon and eve- 
ning. Total cost: $69 plus art work. Universal was so 
pleased with this tv success that they have signed to 
sponsor a Sunday evening program, Madison Square 
Garden, for an entire year. 



CHCT-TV, Calgary, Vlberti 



PROGRAM: Shared I.D.'s 




SPONSOR: Tilton Homes Corp. AGENCY: Direcl 

< \i'-i ii ( VSE HISTORY: Ifter the Tilton Homes 

Corp. had been sponsoring the film program, I \m the 
Law, weekly foi sii weeks on II RE \ II . a representative 
of the In in stated: "Prospective home buyers have been 
arriving at <>tn Rochelle {Illinois) offices every day of 
the week, some from as far aivay as 10(1 miles. We have 
had such an outstanding response that we have had to 
take on an additional salesman." Commercials were 
delivered ovei live cards shotting even phase oj opeia- 
tion in the construction of these homes, including finished 

r Met ioi and interim shots. 



WREX-TV, Rockford, III. 



PROGR Wl: I \m the Law 



SPONSOR: Pel Milk Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSi l l I \H HISTORY: Pet Milk had been sponsor- 
ing /.it's Cisco Kid {lip-synchronized in Spanish) in 
Puerto Rico foi lour months. In a special promotion. 
they offered one autographed photo of Cisco "Duncan 
Renaldo) <>r one autographed photo of his side-kick, 
Poncho {Leo Carillo) in exchange for two Pet Milk 
labels. Each photo also carried a greeting iii Spanish. 

I p to 15 Dei ember. Tel Milk gave uittn a total oj 07.000 
photos, renewing theii initial photo order seven limes. 
Since Puerto Rico boasts only 10,000 tv sets, the sponsor 

considers the figure oj (.7.11(11) amazingly high. 



\\K \0 I\. Puerto Ri,„ 



PROGR \M: Cisco Kid 




How many blocks? 6 or 7? Appearances can be deceiving, but the good 
appearance of a Precision print is not an optical illusion. Immediately apparent are the results 
of Precision-quality processing. 

The individual attention given to each original through the entire operation has earned 
Precision its top spot in the film processing field. Leaders in the photographic profession know 
they can depend on Precision for accurate, intelligent handling of their material. And constant 
research continues for even better ivays to serve your requirements. 

In everything tlvere is one best ...in film processing, it's Precision. 



onuEW ion 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC 

21 WEST 46TH STREET, NEW YORK- 36, N. Y 



^wp 



A division of J. A. Maurer, Inc. 



24 JANUARY 1955 



61 



COVER 

NORTH 
CAROLINA'S 

Rich, Growing 

"GOLDEN 
TRIANGLE" 






with 



WSJS 



TELEVISION 

CHANNEL 12 



*A 24 COUNTY 
MARKET WITH 
EFFECTIVE BUY- 
ING INCOME OF 
$1,543,515,000 

(Sales Management 1954 
Survey of Buying Power) 

NOW SHOWINGI-AU NBC COLOR SHOWS 




Interconnected 
Television Affiliate 



National Representative: 

The Headley-Reed Company 




{Continued from page 8) 

Alter the job was completed, which usually meant after 
more takes than for an MGM musical and more editing than 
a Parisian love idyll requires to get its seal of approval, this 
comment was common: "That's as tough a job as I've ever 
tackled!" 

Commercials are our own private brand of torture which 
we've brought to the film-makers on the coast. By dint of 
hard work, many mistakes, and using up more raw stock than 
C. H. DeMille. the ad business has now developed a colon\ 
of able interpreters within a 10-mile radius of the BevcrK 
Hills Hotel. This, I'd admit, was tough going as the phone 
operators in the hotel can testify. 

As for programing, what amazing things are now being 
fashioned daily. 

Into millions of homes — before the eyes of curly-haired 
youngsters and Bible-belted oldsters — comes product as clean 
as the Epworth League's latest publication: good, fast-paced 
entertainment providing a superb climate for sound advertis- 
ing . . . gaiety without vulgarity . . . glamor without cleavage. 

What wonder- tv has wrought! The shotgun wedding of 
business and the arts has turned out to be a pretty happy 
event after all. And it should continue to be one, just so long 
as we here in our end of the business remember that the film 
folks we're working with may never have produced a pro- 
gram or a set of characters who have to be welcomed by an 
audience 39 times over a span of 39 weeks, or, a commercial 
where package identification is more important than the act- 
ing. By careful and helpful commercial supervision, you can 
asMire better tv copy and more competent crews for the next 
job. By getting them to thinking about the wearing qualities 
of the basic situations and the characterization before the en- 
tire scries of programs is in the can. you ma\ never have to 
lace the oft-distressing t\ problem ol wearability or pro- 
priety. 

Speaking ol propriety, get them to keep in mind thai 
mother in the movie audience will put up with, even enjoy. 
something she'd never tolerate in her home with the kids sit- 
ting beside her. And she'll let the sponsor know her dis- 
pleasure (not merely by mail but usuall) b\ buying a com- 
petitor's brand I . 

Anticipate your problem-, get your points across to your 
cohorts early. Then you'll have more time to enjoy yourself 
at the Beverlv Hills pool. 



• • • 



62 



SPONSOR 




People are 


looking at 


Sarra Commercials for 


A&P 


Jergens Lotion 


Braun's Bread 


Kraft 


Bromo-Quinine 


Lucky Strike 


Bulova 


Cigarettes 


Cat-Tex 


Lux Beauty Soap 


Chase National 


Lux Liquid 


Bank 


Detergent 


Chrysler Airtemp 


Pabst Blue Ribbon 


Coors Beer 


Beer 


Cnnard Steamship 


Pet Milk 


Lines 


P.O.C. Beer 


Helene Curtis 


Ponds Angel Skin 


Duncan Hines 


Rinso 


Cake Mixes 


Ronson Fuel 


Eastman Kodak 


and Flints 


Evinrude Motors 


Stopette 


Hoffman Mixers 


Jane Wilson 


Hostess Cup Cakes 


Meat Pies 




WiA-r- 



Specialists in Visual Selling 
ISew York: 200 E. 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 E. Ontario Street 



TELEVISION COMMERCIALS • PHOTOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION 

24 JANUARY 1955 



MOTION PICTURES • SOUND SLIDE FILMS 



63 




WCOV-TV 

Montgomery, Alabama 

BEST BUY IN 

CENTRAL ALABAMA 

NETWORKS 



CBS PRIMARY 
ABC — DUMONT 

SPONSORED FILMS 



Amos & Andy — Li be race 
City Detective Mark Sabre — 
Bage 714 — Star & Story — Fol- 
low That Man — Counterpoint 
Kit Carson — Ramar of Jungle 
I Am The Law 

EXPERIENCE 



We've been operating for 21 
months and boast one of the 
finest physical television plants 
in the nation. We have ex- 
perienced personnel in every 
department to assure top pro- 
duction. 

ASK ANY RAYMER 
OFFICE FOR DETAILS 





New developments on SPONSOR stories 

See: "12 fallacies about nighttime radio" 

Issue: 10 August 1953. page 30 

Subject: Size and characteristics of the «-\«-- 
ning radio audience 

IIh- nighttime radio audience i- big: Vboul l<>ur out of every lti 
homes and one person out of every three listens to the radio during 
the average evening. These and other facts were brought out in 
recently-released excerpts of an NBC-Starch study on "The Charac- 
teristics & Possessions of Evening Radio Listening Household-." 

On the average evening, radio is listened to b) 56.250,000 people 
in 10.704.000 households, the Starch report finds. Based on 47.5 
million as the total number of U.S. households, this means radio 
reaches slightly more 419r of all U.S. homes during the average 
evening. The report states thai 11,850,000 households listen two 
hours or more. 

The Starch survey was made between \o\ember 1953 and April 
L954. Complete results of the study, based on a national probabi!it\ 
sample of 16.000 people in 13,000 households, are now being com- 
piled and interpreted by the NBC research department. 

The first excerpts of the report highlights of which are included 
here were recenth released l>> account supervisors and othei BBDO 
executives as a follow-up to the agency's symposium on radio late 
last year. (The symposium was held to "re-acquaint" agency ac- 
count people with radio and was based on presentations by the four 
major networks, i 

The report comes up with one set of figure- that might point to a 
trend. These figures seem to indicate that the longer a fainib owns 
a t\ set. the more apt it is to listen to radio in the evening. Of the 
families who owned a tv set one year or less, 15.9% listen to radio 
on an average evening; of those who have owned 1\ sets two \ears. 
17.0' , listen to evening radio; of those who have owned tv three 
years. 10.1', listen to evening radio; four years, 22.4',. and five 
years or more, 26.6' , . 

To show that the radio audience is made up of "typical" U.S. 
households. Starch-NBC list various characteristics of all U.S. house- 
holds compared with those households in which there is evening 
radio listening. Take household si/e. for example. Of all U.S. 
households. 21.7' , have three members. Of all households in which 
radio is listened to. 21.7' < have three members. Some 30', of all 
I .S. households have two members; 31', of household- in which 
evening radio is heard consist of tw : o members. 

Kvening radio listeners have had the same amount of education 
laclualb a slight bit morel than "average I .S." citizens. And the 
age id evening radio listeners in each age categor\ i-a\ from 2d 
in 35 years) is nearl) the same (10.3', i as the percentage of the 
total I .S. population falling into that age category i21.1', i. 

Another survey, made for ABC Radio by Stewart. Dougall & 
\-sociales I ii<-.. make- a strong case for radio, but in a different 
direction. ABC wanted to disprove the theorj held b) some media 
men thai maga/inc ad\eiti-emenls made a stronger impression on a 
potential customer than radio commercials. There were 1.000 cases 
studied iimlei controlled conditions which eliminated the effect of 
an) influences outside printed (eye) vs. spoken (eai I media. Copy, 
brand name and order of presentation were rotated to eliminate the 
ellc< t ol anj "I these influences. 

Findings: l<>'< of the respondents chose the brand they heard 
about on radio; 15', chose the brand the) had seen in the maga- 
zine ad. Nine percent <d the respondents had no choice. * * + 



64 



SPONSOR 



' 



<c 



V 



• 



/,. 



lit- 



-r? 



XHt B\GGtST 



\_- 



y 



I 



x, 



CONlH* SWOW 



/C » V 



vy 



/ 




The 



C KLES] UU 




n RADIO 

FUN GALOftf/ 



«K You 

"Whoopee" 



!«r^™ 



THE 



COMEDY SHOW 
ever offered to 
Local Sponsors! 



Xtf& 



■ ■ ■ 



ZIV'S ANSWER TO 
RADIO'S BIG NEED 
FOR BOLD, NEW 



. y «*K 



■Ifi 



**«•', 



^BBTf 



*& m *m. 







Red lines show the 50.000 channel miles of the television network which can carry color programs 



Color Television Network 
now reaches 109 cities 



[954 was a big and busy year for color. Since 
the FCC approved the compatible system in 
December 1953, 50,000 channel miles of the 
Bell System television network have been spe- 
cially adapted to carry color programs to 150 
stations in 109 cities. 

In addition to the big job of color conver- 
sion, the Bell System has also added [8,000 
channel miles to the nationwide 1 Y network. 



Conversion of the television network to 
transmit color is an exacting and expensive job. 

New equipment must he added and hundreds 
of technicians must he trained in the complex 
color techniques in order to maintain and 
adjust this equipment to exad standards. 

Plans for 1955 call lor continued expansion 
of the television network — to keep pace with 
the industry's expanding needs. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

PROVIDING TRANSMISSION CHANNELS FOR INTERCITY TELEVISION TODAY AND TOMORROW 




68 



SPONSOR 




[Continued from page 32) 

a> ol that day he is going on a reducing program. Each 
succeeding Saturday he plans to weigh himself again. When 
he ha> Hicceeded in dropping 75 pounds, and has reached 
the sylphlike 190-pound figure, he will reveal what magic 
product has enabled him to accomplish this melting miracle. 
and it will he offered for public sale. Jackie, it goes without 
saying, owns this product. 

Reporter Bacon's story said nothing about the attitude of 
Nescafe or Schick, Jackie's present sponsors, toward this 
new project. But for the purposes of this piece, that is a little 
beside the point. If the chubby comic's reducing stunt comes 
off as planned, there is little doubt it will be one of the most 
effective pieces of tv salesmanship ever devised. 

What it may lead to one trembles to contemplate. Certain- 
ly some enterprising producer of a reducing aid should im- 
mediately sign someone like Jack E. Leonard, who is a good 
comic, and weighs even more than Gleason. And any num- 
ber of advertisers selling beauty products, should seriously 
consider hiring a skinny, ugly young lady around whom to 
build a show. Can you imagine the public demand for the 
product, when at the end of the 13-week cycle this ugly duck- 
ling blossoms into a Gina Lollobrigida? 

Wheaties may be able to arrange a deal with a .200 hitter 
(as of the time he makes his debut on the program), who 
after a couple of months of eating the product on the show, 
is hitting around four hundred, and leading the league in 
RBFs and home runs. 

And envision the audience impact of a show sponsored 
by that Wall Street stock brokerage firm, wherein the - star 
purchases a hundred dollars worth of stock on the first show, 
and after 26 stanzas has parlayed same into a neat nest egg 
of a million dollars. 

The possibilities are endless, and a large comedian shall 
have led the way. Advertisers, agencies, the time has obvi- 
ously come to re-evaluate and re-appraise your whole ap- 
proach to selling through television. This is the kind of 
thing that will happen increasingly when showbusiness and 
showmen begin running rampant in merchandising. * * * 




Letters to Joe Csirfn are welcomed 

Do you always agree ivith the opinions foe Csida expresses 
in "Sponsor Backstage?" Joe and the editors of SPONSOR 
would be happy to receive and print comments from readers. 
Address Joe Csida. c^o sponsor. 40 E. 49 5/. 



WTHI-TV Channel 10 

is the ONLY station 

with complete coverage 

of the Greater 

Wabash Valley 

• One of the Mid-west's 
most prosperous indus- 
trial and agricultural 
markets 

• $714,500,000 Retail 
Sales in year '53-'54 

• Blanketed ONLY by 
WTHI-TV's 316,000 
watt signal 

• 227,000 Homes 
(147,000 TV homes) 



118,000 

UNDUPLICATED 
WTHI-CBS 
TV HOMES! 

WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 
TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

316,000 Watts 



Represented nationally 
by: 

The Boiling Co. 

New York * Chicago 



24 JANUARY 1955 



69 



JEAN CARROLL 
Timebuyer 
Sullivan, 
Stauffer, 




-V"*. 




Check the latest Hart- 
' ' ford-New Haven rat- 
ings and you will find 
WNHC-TVisthemost- 
looked-at TV station 
in the state. I have 
seen the excellent re- 
sults of a spot cam- 
paign on Channel 8. 
There is no guesswork 
...WNHC-TVhasthe 
buying audience. 




899,957 TV 



FAMILIES 
3,484,400 POP. 



$6 BILLION MARKET 



ASK YOUR KATZ MAN 



HARTFORD-NEW HAVEN 





Gardner's "Chick" Martini, flanked by Elsa Maxwell and Gloria Swanson, in line 

of duty 



agency profile 



Roland Vfcirtfiiii 

V.p., Radio-Tv Director 
Gardner Advertising Co., New York 



Every business has its individualists, and Roland "'Chick" Martini 
is a member of that select band among radio-tv admen. Not only 
is he sufficiently unimpressed In conventional taboos to come up 
with new talent i from Vic Damone for Ralston in 1947 to George 
Gobel for Pet Milk in 1954) and new production values: but — 
adding insult to injury — he's a non-conformist as well. In the 
midst of clean-shaven. Brooks-suited Madi-un \venue. Martini 
wears a mustache and double-breasted, pin-stripe suits. 

"Ma\be that's because f was a writer." Martini reflected. In the 
192()'s. Martini unite adventure and m\ster\ stories for pulp maga- 
zines, as well as articles for H. L. Mencken's American Mercury. 

He likes to remember those days and the life in Greenwich Vil- 
lage where a pretty date at parties wasn't safe once I homas Wolfe 
arrived. He recalls a certain spirit of intensit) and dedication that 
"•jut lost somewhere on the wa\ uptown." 

I ptown, Martini wrote radio scripts for Frank Hummert radio 
scripts by the dozen, script after script, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.. 
at a frantic rate of 18 or 20 a week. Scripts for Orphan Annie. 
Skippy, Penrod and Sam. Good script- and bad scripts, but, above 
all, man) scripts. 

"Our main handicap in those days was the Fact that most of us 
typed with two ringers," add.- Martini. "This -lowed production." 

The difference between radio and t\ writing, remarks Martini, i- 
al leasl parti) mathematical. "In radio, one man wrote 20 scripts 
a week. In t\. il lake- 20 men to write one 

Mr points to George Gobel as a comedian who -ticks to his ma- 
terial. "He rarely ad libs. In fact, he's ver) precise." 

Pel Milk sponsors The George Gohel Slum. NBC TV, Satiinla\-. 
L0:00-10:30 p.m., alternatel) with Vrmour Co. Some $5 to s <> mil- 
Lion in radio-tA billings came through Gardner Advertising's New 
N ork office in 1951. It's Martini's job to supervise network shows 
originating out oi New York and Hollywood. He usuall) spends two 
miiiiili- a year on the \\ esl < loast. 

When- would he be if he weren't an adman/ 

""( )n the beach of Majorca." * * • 



70 



SPONSOR 



C d autftvir 






and we'll tell you about 
Country Music in Indiana 



Call it hill-billy or call it folk music. Call it country music. Call 
it what you will. Here at WFBM (Radio and TV) we call it 
excellent for producing audiences.* 






This is Charley Gore. 



These are Herb anil 
Kay Adams. 



These are The Rangers. 



24 JANUARY 1955 



Indiana Hoedown, 

featuring Gore. Herb & Kay. and The Rangers, 
is on WFBM-TV from 10:30 to 11:00 every 
Monday evening, and 10:00 to 10:30 
Saturday evening. 

The Herb & Kay Show 

is on WFBM-Radio daily at 

11:05-15 AM. 

The Charley Gore Show. 

witli The Rangers, is on WFBM-Radio 

daily at 5:30-45 PM. 

Hoosier Farm Circle, 
Indiana's oldest farm program, features 
the entire group for a half hour daily on 
WFBM-Radio at 12:30 PM. 

Participations or entire sponsorships are available, 
subject to prior sale. Check the 
Katz Agency or the stations. 

• Ihilti upan request 

WFBM AM&TV 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Represented Nationally /<> the Kuiz Agency 



Affiliated with WEOA, Evansville; WFDF, Flint; WOOD AM & TV, Grand Rapids 

71 




a forum on questions of current interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



How ran sponsors protect tiyttinst right of* privueg 
ciiicf ttei'innution suits arising out of their tr shows? 



THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

GET RESPONSIBLE PRODUCER 

By Fred Coe 
Producer. NBC TV. New York 






S p o 11 s (i r s a n (I 
agencies must 
take the respon- 
sibilit) of seeing 
to it that they are 
linked in with re- 
sponsible produc- 
ers who in turn. 
will bring to 
their shows re- 
sponsible writers. 

It is up to the producer to be very 
alert in reading and producing scripts. 
c-pr< iall\ those submitted b\ authors 
who are not familiar to him. One 
young writer, ju-l beginning his ca- 
reer, submitted a script to us: we 
liked it and produced it. We later 
found out that he had used name- mil 
actual situations taken from the small 
town where he lived. There was. in 
consequent e, an embai rassing legal 
suit facing the producing organization. 
So thai one rule for a produ ei 
might be: know your writer well and 
make sure he understands the law him- 
self. I i ue. writers must write from 
linn own experience. But for protec- 
tee purposes they should be encour- 
aged i" cove] up the original sources 
as much as possible — change the lo- 
( ale, names and situations to help in 

the < .inio ullage. 

Ii i- possible that a writer may 
really feel that he has dreamt up a 
trul) fictional character or situation, 
u hi reas he has subconscious!) based 
his thinking on verj real life. In this 
way, resemblances may also result in 



trouble. \\ bile producing one show 
that had a direct criticism of the comic 
bonk business, I worked with a writer 
who was an e\-artist and was quite 
familiar with the < tunic field. In our 
formulation of the show, we somehow 
subconsciously began to build around 
a certain person in the comic book 
industn who had become quite la- 
mous. His name did not once occur 
to us during the whole proceeding — 
we were sure we were building a fic- 
tional character. But sure enough, 
cfter the show, this man brought suit 
lit was. fortunately, settled out of 
court) . 

\\ ith respect to documentary shows, 
of which we've done many, it is im- 
portant to check each and every or- 
ganization and individual involved and 
get the proper release papers from all 



Who wants a libel suit? 

Recently, a $1,000,000 libel 
suit was filed against CBS TV 
and Westinghouse over a plaj 
which appeared on Studio 
<hn-. The plaintill claims 
thai lie was one of the chief 
characters portrayed in the 
plaj and thai it was plainlv 
implied that he was the slayer 
of a certain politician (who-,' 
real-life murder is as yet un- 
solved l . 

This i- a l\ pe of jam that 
no -pon-oi well miles. < ,111 
precautions be taken to a\ oid 
or at lea-t reduce the risk of 
legal tangles? I!ead what 
SPONSOR'S picked — and knowl- 
edgeable panel suggests. 



ol them. For example, when we did 
the documentary drama on Gold- 
berger, the man who discovered a cure 
for pellagra, it was necessar\ for us 
to contact people scattered all over the 
world and wait to get verification. \\ e 
-pent three months doing this check- 
ing. All of our productions need and 
net the same thorough treatment. 



USE TIGHT CHECK SYSTEM 

By Cecilia M. Mulrooney 

Assistant to th*> Business Manager 
Benton & Bowles, Inc., N. Y. 

In order to pro- 
tect our clients 
a n d ourselves 
I iom suits of this 
nature we have 
set up a system 
ol checking with- 
in our television 
operation. Pro- 
ducers, directors, 
writers, account executives and any- 
one connected with the planning and 
production of a television program, 
are made aware of the legal pitfalls 
involved in using actual people, their 
names, photographs or biographical 
material in connection with a program. 
and any such uses are cleared with the 
T\ Business Department. Ibis depart- 
ment i- responsible for setting up the 
necessary legal safeguards and in so 
doing works \er\ closely with the 
agency's legal advisors. 

\n\ proposed use ol people, name-. 
etc., is checked with our legal counsel 
to ascertain i I i the legal risks in- 
volved and (2) what can be done to 
give the Agency and the client the 
greatest possible legal protection 







72 



SPONSOR 



through methods of procedure, secur- 
ing of releases, etc. 

To reduce risks to a minimum we 
have set up certain standard proce- 
dures. For instance, one area where 
there is a definite possibility of inva- 
sion of privacy is in the use of names 
for fictional characters in programs. 
To protect against this we obtain re- 
leases from various people for the use 
of their names in this connection. A 
list of these released names is then 
supplied to the writers of our pro- 
grams and they are reque-ted to draw 
their character names from this. In 
the event a writer "dreams ii|> a name 
for a special character, we then search 
for a person who legal Is hears that 
name and obtain a clearance from him. 

Precautions must also he taken in 
connection with audience participation 
in l\ programs. One of the programs 
we produce for a major client features 
human interest stories about people 
who actually appear on the program. 
\\ e have a special office staff for this 
program which devotes itself to inter- 
viewing these people, checking their 
stories for authenticity, obtaining re- 
leases from participants as well as peo- 
ple referred to on the program. 



MAKE CHARACTER COMPLETE 

By David M. Salinger 

Legal Counsel to a variety of interests 

in advertising, radio ami tv 

Solinger & Cordon. ,\. V. 

If you had been 
a male house- 
holder in the Los 
Angeles area five 
or si\ years ago, 
you might have 
received a pink 
envelope a d - 
dressed in a deli- 
cate feminine 
hand. On opening it, you would have 
found a letter reading: "Dearest: 
Don't breathe it to a soul, but I'm 
back in Los Angeles and more curious 
than ever to see you. Remember how 
I cut up about a \ear ago? Well. I'm 
raring to go again, and believe me I'm 
in the mood for fun. Let's renew our 
acquaintanceship and 1 promise you 
an evening you won'l forget. Meet me 
in front of Warners Downtown The- 
atre at 7th and Hill on Thursday. Just 
look for a girl with a gleam in her 
eye, a smile on her lips and mischief 
I Please turn to pa lie LOO) 





ALWAYS 
A JUMP 
AHEAD 



KSL-T V's merchandising service puts 
more cash in any advertiser's pocket. 
Every effort is made to let everyone 
know what's doing advertising- 
wise, and our Personalized 
Service insures full cooperation 
between local distributors 
and retailers. 




What's more, letters in the 
KSL-TV files prove that out- 
merchandising activity forces 
distribution in the Intermountain 
area. For more information, 
call CBS Television 
Spot Sales, or 

KSL-TV 

SALT LAKE CITY 




Serving 39 Counties in Four Western States 



24 JANUARY 1955 



73 




v':- 



:,-:.' 



Department store culls color iv sponsorship suit's success 



"We are delighted with the sales 
results. . . ." That's how Bill Hail, 
advertising manager ol the White 
House, San Francisco departmenl 
store, described the results <>! a pre- 
Christmas television campaign. 

The store sponsored twice-weekl) 
Santa'* 11 Orkshop on KRON-TV, tele- 
. .1-1 in coloi said i<> In- the firs! local 
cold tv show on the West Coast ami 
the first color tv program anywhere 
sponsored In a department store. For- 
mal of the show consisted ol Santa 
(Ian- (played l>\ Gerrj Walter) dem- 
onstrating and displaying a wide va- 
in l\ of to\s in hi- North I'ole work- 
shop. In addition to toys, the commer- 
■ i.il- plugged from 50 to 75 other 
items of general merchandise. 

Ad manager Hart, he-ides bring de- 
lighted with the sales results, said the 
store was "extremely proud to have 



been the count] y's hi-i depai tment 
-inn- io sponsoi a color t\ show. This 
\ear we have enjoved the most -uc- 
cessful ln\ -c.i-on we ve seen for main 
years, contrary to the experience of 
other retailer- in this area."" Hart said 
that as a direct result of the show S 
commercials, more than lo.omi piece:- 
of mail were received from children. 
\ll the letter- were answered, he said. 
"There's no doubt in ni\ mind that 
coloi t\ will he an important sales tool 
for departmenl stores in coming years. 
1 feel certain thai lhe\ will become 
among the biggest users of television 

a- -non as the commercial application 
of color emerges from its initial ex- 
perimental stage. And that should be 
pretty soon." 

Agency for the store's television a< - 
tivitv is Bernard 1'. Schnit/.er. Inc., 
San Francisco. * * * 



WOWO-Fah campaign provides 1. 100 (foils- lor needy girls 

\ public service campaign designed 
to give doll- to little girls in hospitals 
and orphanages resulted in tangible 
good will toward the co-sponsors 
WOWO, Fori Wayne, hi. I., and Col- 
gate-Palmolive Co. 

The Christina- project worked like 
this: \ lew week- before Christmas 
\\ ( t\\ ( > gave brief announcement- ask- 
ing listeners to send in Fab boxtops. 
I he boxtops, said \\ < »\\ < ». would be 
used h\ the station to "bin"" dolls for 
need) children i two giant or four large 
tops "bought" one doll l. Displays in 
more than LOO grocer) stoic- also told 
the story of the W0W0-C-P "Opera- 
lion Dolly." 

I isteners contributed more than 
1.000 Fab boxtops and more than 
1,100 dolls were donated b) < !-P in re- 
turn for the tops. On each box was 
the message, "I rom the friend- of 
\\ I )\\0." 

In addition to the public service, the 
project moved merchandise. Without 
so nun h .i- ,i single c menial on 



Circus acts booking ayeney 
finds tv helps business 

I clc\ i-ion has Inn t his motion pic- 
ture business, report- George \. 
Ham id. but it's been a boon to circus 
and amusement a< i-. 

Hamid own- a chain of South Jerse) 
motion picture theatres. He's also the 
operator of one of the largest booking 
agencies for circus acts. 

I\ has helped his hooking agenc) in 
two ways, -a\s Hamid. First, once hi? 
acts go on television they become so 
well known and popular that then 
price goes up. SecondK. he says, that 
main fairs and amusements parks now 
are booking acts through him sight un- 
seen. " Ml the) seem to care about," he 
asserts, "is that the acts have television 
credits." 

Because of t\. Hamid said, circus 
performers now are being accorded the 
same popularity that stage and screen 
-tars enjoy. Hamid believes that t\ 
w ill bring out a new crop of circus and 
novelty talent. 

"Animal acts — so far — appear to 
have gone over best on television." 
Hamid has found. "And almost an\ 
skill act will he successful on tv. How- 
ever, we've found that some of our 
coined) acts, for some reason, can fall 
absolutely flat. Strangely enough, we 
find that a small, unknown act will go 
over bigger with tv audiences than a 
well known standard circus act." * * * 




WOWO staffers help deliver needy girls' dolls 

Fab, C-P reports that there was a no- 
ticeable increase in December sales in 
the area. 

In the picture. Carl Vandagrift il. i. 
WOWO manager, and Hilda Woehr- 
iiicmi i r. I . WOWO promotion man- 
ager, assist in holding open studio 
doors as girls of the station staff carry 
boxes of dolls to cars. WOWO extvu- 
li\es delivered the dolls in their own 
cars to necd\ girls within a 100-mile 
radius of the station. * • * 



Empluytnent agency happy 
n-ii/i radio 'help iniiucd" ads 

The classified page- of newspapers 
are becoming vulnerable to competi- 
tion from radio. 

One of the latest of a growing num- 
ber of programs based on the classified 
page- format is aired by W Hl.l. Hemp- 
-tead, New York. Since September 
1954 Kennedy Emplo) inent \geno 
and Tops Temporary Personnel have 
been running "help wanted" and "sit- 
uation wanted" announcements on the 
station. 

Kenned) and Tops Temporal) Per- 
sonnel share sponsorship of five-min- 
ute news broadcasts aired three times 

weekK at 1:30 p.m. The approximate 

co-t is $18 a program and is the first 
radio expenditure In the companies. 

"1 didn't expect an) immediate re- 
action to in) radio advertising," Wil- 
liam Kenned), president of both per- 
i Please turn page I 



74 



SPONSOR 



y When You Know Ho 




^aditx cued 

STATIONS 



KANSAS CITY: KCMO Radio & KCMO-TV „.„»„ 
SYRACUSE: WHEN Radio &WHEN-TV hh(r , 
PHOENIX: KPHO Radio & KPHO-TV ^^ 
OMAHA: 

ah^whh Betier Homes ^ 



WOW Radio & WOW -TV JMM <- 



s . - ■*•■ - • 




and Garden; 



24 JANUARY 1955 



75 




sonnel agencies, told sponsor. "Hut 
within the first week we had three pros- 
|)ecti\e clients and more than a dozen 
applicants for positions. After six 
wicks the WHLI broadcasts brought in 
more than 50 new clients and appli- 
cants from various parts of Long Is- 
land." He said that prospective client- 
are improsed with the agency because 
ill its use of radio in addition to news- 
paper advertising. * * * 

Briefly . . . 

Pointing out Broadcast Advertising 

Bureaus change in name t<> Ratlin \<1- 
vertising Bureau is Miss Radio for 
1955. According to Miss Radio, who 
apparent!) had a peek at the member- 
ship files (whirl) i- only fair since the 



y^reeti 



inaS 

from the gang at 



KGVO 



CBS 
RADIO 



and 



KGVO-TV 

1955 will be MORE 
prosperous with a 

1-2 sales punch 



n WESTERN MONTANA 



GILL-PERNA, , tpi 




MISSOULA, MONTANA 




WHBF 



ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 
CBS FOR THE QUAD-CITIES 

is favored by location 
in a 4-city metropol- 
itan area, surrounded 
by 10 of the most pro- 
ductive rural counties 
in the nation. 
In both radio and tv 
WHBF is the Quad- 
Cities favorite. 

Les Johnson. V.P. and Cen. Mer. 

u 




WHBF 

TEICO BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




members now can have a peek at hei > . 
RAB has more than 850 members. 
The) include individual radio stations. 
networks, station representatives, tran- 
scription companies and affiliated or- 
ganizations. 

* * » 

The last four months of L954 saw a 
I'Hr, increase in national advertising 
Eoi WVEC-TV, Norfolk. \ a., accord- 
ing to Thomas 1\ Chisman. president. 
Chii-man reported that his uhf outlet 
eiijo\ed a 12* H > ' , increase in local >ales. 
\inl he's predicting a record year for 
1955. New national advertisers on the 
station include Bulova, Gordon's 

I Is, Pepsi-Cola. Kool. I)eSoto-IM\ - 

mouth. Manischevvitz wines. Sunshine 
Biscuit, Budweiser. 

i Please tarn to page 1~" I 



76 



SPONSOR 




YOU MIGHT SKATE 100 YARDS UV 11.4 SECONDS* 



HIT 



PULSE REPORT— 100% YARDSTICK 

KALAMAZOO TRADING AREA — FEBRUARY, 1953 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 





6 a.m. -12 noon 


12 noon-6 p.m. 


6 p.m.-midmgnt 


WKZO 
B 


59% (a) 


59% 


48% 


21 


14 


23 


C 


5 (a) 


4 


6 


D 


4 


4 


4 


E 


3 


4 


7 


MISC. 


9 


14 


12 



(a) fioes no/ broadcast for complete six-hour period and the 
share of audience is unadjusted for this situation. 



#' n ~% 




& 

WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDSKALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN.TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
VVMBD — PEORIA ILLINOIS 



YOU NEED WKZO RADIO 

TO SET RECORDS 

IN WESTERN MICHIGAN! 

You just can't cover Western Michigan without WKZO. 
Pulse figures, left, prove that WKZO gets the lions share 
of the audience, 18 hours per day! In the afternoon, for 
example, WKZO delivers 321. 4'/ more listeners than Sta- 
tion B, for onlv 35.39? "lore money. 

Pulse isn't the only yardstick. Nielsen, too, credits 
WKZO — with 177.7' < more average dail\ daytime families 
than Station B! 




CBS RADIO FOR KALAMAZOO 
AND GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery- Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



Loretta Sietzel set tins world's record foi 



"n ut Detroit in January, 1929. 



24 JANUARY 1955 



77 






WORD LAZY? 

i Continued from page 17 

which would be a fa i It ■— -riimi> sin. 

The matter of the wrong choice of 
words in television brings us to — as 
thev sa\ the heart t>f the subject. 
Several years ago I heard copywriters 
referred to as copycats. I his ma\ ap- 
|'l\ In Cop) « i ileis iii all media ttxlav . 
hut with the t\ writer it's more apt to 
be apparent. Have yoursell a miser- 
able evening watching (\ sometime- as 
you count the number of times the 
following words and phrase- ring out: 
hi: yes; amazing; revolutionary; sen- 
sational; what's more: but first: fin- 
est: ever; never before; greatest; ab- 
solutely; so >top in; friends: folks; 
first thing tomorrow : it's new : it's 
here: for the first time: actually; 
that's right; remember; wonderful: he 
sure to; the world's most: typical; 
thanks to. 

Honest it is possible to write bard- 
selling commercials without resorting 
to am of the above. Not that they're 



not perfect!) innocent English words, 
acceptable to am crossword puzzle 
and in common usage in every home, 
hut they're badly in need of rest on 
television. The public just doesn't 
bear them any more. 

Tv commercial cop) has fallen too 
much into a pattern. ^ ou get that un- 
easy feeling watching and hearing 
commercials that, in most cases, to- 
day's "pro" is content to knock it out 
the same old wa\ ever) time, lazily 
dropping in different product names 
and sales points wherever the) con- 
venient!) fit. 

Let me cite an example of formula 
writing. I didn't cop) this down at 
the exact moment I caught it. 1 didn't 
have to. 

ANNOUNCER: Folks, we received 
a very wonderful letter recently from 
a Mrs. - -, who had some very 

nice things to say about our product. 
And rather than read it to \ou we've 
invited Mrs. — to he with us 

toda"\ to tell \ou in her own words. 



Hell... Mrs. 



(As if he 



hadn't seen her until this moment, i 

l//«'.\ \ : Hello. Tom. {As if she 
I, neu him well enough to call him hv 
his first name. I 

ANNOUNCER: I understand, Mrs. 
. that you're the mother of 
three children. It that right? (Of 
course it's right. He I, nous it. She 
/.nous he Limns it. The viewer knows 
she knows he I. nous it.) 

Mrs. X: That's right. Tom. 

AA \<>l \CER: Thev must really 
keep \ ou hoppin', huh? 

II <)\l t\ : T!ie\ certain!) do. Tom. 
And that's why I Product Name) is es- 
pecialK welcome at our house. (COM- 
MERCIAL. COMMERCIAL, COM- 
MERCIAL.) 

ANNOUNCER: Well, what you've 
told us, Mrs. certainly ap- 

plies to all mothers. (MORE COM- 
MERCIAL) Thank you very much. 
Mrs. .... 

MRS. X : You re welcome, Tom. 
I Please turn />«ge i 




/Veto stations on air' 



CITY & 8TATE 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO 



ON-AIR 
OATF 



ERP (kw)' 
I Visual 



Antenna 

(ft)"* 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 

ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKET! 

'000> 



PERMITEE & MANAGER 



HENDERSON, Nev. 



MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. 



PHOENIX, Arii. 



TAMPA, Fla. 



KLRJ-TV 



KEYD-TV 



KTVK 



WFLA-TV 



15 Jan 



9 Jan. 



31 Jan. 



5 Feb. 



11 258 



316 451 



100 1,668 



316 1,034 



NBC KLAS-TV 18vhf 



Du M WCCO-TV 550 vhf 

WTCN-TV 
KSTP-TV* 
WMIN-TV 



KOOL-TV 103 vhf 

KPHO-TV 

KVAR' 



NBC WSUN-TV' 125 vhf 



Soutl-wrsttrn Pub. Co. 
Donald W. Reynolds. 

pres. 
A. E. Cahian. v.p.-treas. 
Robert Gardner, gen. 

mgr.-sls. mgr. 

Family Broadcasting Corp. 
Henry C. Klages. pres. 
Joseph E. Dahl. v. p. 
Lee L. Whiting, v.p.. 

gen. mgr. 
Kenneth E. Pettijohn. 

sec. 
C. T. Skar.se. treas. 
Raymond J. Tenpenny. 

asst. mgr. 

Arizona Television Co. 

Ernest W. McFarland. 
pres. 

Leon M Nowell. ».p. 

Ralph A. Watkins. v.p.- 
treas. 

Edward Cooper, part 
owner 

H. R. Larson, sec. 

Tribune Co. 

0. Tennant Bryan, bd. 

chmn. 
John C. Council, pres.- 

treas. 
George Harvey, gen. mgr. 



U.S. stations on air, incl. 
Honolulu and ilaska ' 15 Jan. 
'55 1 
Markets corrrrrt 



12 1 



BOX SCORE 



Post-freeze, c.p.'s granted (ex- 
cluding 34 educational grants: 
15 Jan. '."..", i 
Grantees on air 



r,it:s 



Tv sets in V. S. (] De< . 

'54) 32,996,000! 

/ ,S. homes with tv sets (1 

Dei 14) «.!"„•: 



•Both new c.p.'i and station* going on the air listed here are those which occurred between 
2 .Ian and l 5 .i;m or on whlcl in thai peril I 

considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. ••Effective radiated power. Aural 
power usually Is one-half the visual power, •••Antenna height above average terrain (not 
above ground!, t Information on the number of sets in markets where not dcslgnnted as being 
from NBC Research, consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed approxi- 
mate. IData from NBC Research and Planning Percentages based on homes with sets and 
homes In tv covrrago areas are considered approximately. Ti In most cases, the representative of a 
radio station which Is granted a c.p. also represents the new tv operation. Since at prcsaUjne 



It Is generally too early to confirm tv representative! of most grantees, SPONSOR lists the 
the radio stations In this column (when a radio station has been given the tv grant). 
NFA : No figures available at prcsstime on sets In market 
^This number includes irt nnts to permifces who have since surrendered their c.p.'s or who have 

had tl voided by FCC "KLA9 TV is located in La Vega Nei about 1 1 miles from 

h ■ ■, KSTP-n si I \\ui\ i\ ited ii Bl Paul <K\\R (tv) Is located In 

H< i 16 miles from Phoenix. w^: s i\ I i cati I In Bl Petersburg, Fla-, 

les fi m Tat 



78 



SPONSOR 







Lend an ear to the man from Blair, or 
let WHB General Manager George W. 
Armstrong bend your aural extremity. 

*HOOPER RADIO INDEX — 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Friday. Nov.-Dec, 1951 



*w 



CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 

President: Todd Storz * 

KOWH Omaha WTIX, New Orleans WHB, Kansas City 
Represented by Represented by Represented by 

H-R, Reps, Inc. Adam J. Young, Jr. John Blair & Co. 



WHB 

10,000 watts on 710 kc. 
Kansas City, Missouri 



24 JANUARY 1955 



79 



IWol \CER: 'Bye now. 

Sincere and honest as the above 
interview ma) have been, it didn't 
come ofT. My wife's comment was, 
"Balonev ! 

Nothing should *atisfv a writer's 
conscience more than being able to 
take a piece of cop) from Ins type- 
writer and honestl) say: "This copy 
is sound according to what I know 
about basic advertising and it docs 
not contain the same word- ever) 
other commercial contains. \ i h I I m 
not referring to big or fancy words 
either. Just a tew nice synonyms now 



and then. 

All copy, of course, is at the men \ 
of the talent who delivers it. Just an- 
other reason win the words must 
work harder. 

Here';- something else to think about. 
Frequently certain ke) words — some- 
time- a vital part of the basic theme 
expression — are lifted bodily from 
print advertisements and dropped into 
the unsuspecting mouth of the tele- 
vision announcer without regard to 
how sincere and sensible the\ will 
-ound. Frequentlv this doc-n't work. 
A series of adjectives, for example. 



CALIFORNIA'S 
BIGGEST GOLD 
RUSH SINCE '49 



V 



And what a rush it has been! 

In the short period of just 60 days, 7 
national and regional advertisers 
have moved their half-hour shows to 
CHANNEL 6, the station that covers 
a// the SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 
MAKKFT. 

Advertisers in the BILLION DOLLAR 
SAN DIEGO MARKET are digging 
for sales. They are calling on the 
down-to earth, pick and shovel selling 

methods of station SELI and they're 

striking Southern California gold ! 

We've no secret formula, but there 
must be . . . there are . . . good reasons 
for this great migration: 

• TOP RATINGS 

• LOWEST COST PER 
THOUSAND 

• INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED 
MERCHANDISING 

Would you like our 

WEED TELEVISION 

Representative to call? 

Sa*t Diego Monicet 

JULIAN M. KAUFMAN, General Manager 

General Offices: Ml 1 ) Park Boulevard 
San Diego 4, California 






MARKS 

THE SPOT WHERE 

IT HAPPENED 



'FAVORITE STORY' 

Olympia Beer 



"CISCO KID 

Webers Bread 



"RIN TIN TIN" 

yVi \\ National Biscuit Company 

(fo~ "ELLERY QUEEN" 

/•y^l^C Town Talk Bread 

-"FLORIAN ZABACH" 

Vogue Soap 

"WATERFRONT 

/ , . \ Standard Oil Co. 

- 'V 

"ANNIE OAKLEY" 

, , »\*" Laura Scudder Potato 
/ ' | Chips & TV Time Popcorn 




which cap off a neat, crisp headline. 
Fine in print. Grinding, irritating 
and— again phonv in television. Am 
basic theme planning for an advertis- 
ing campaign in which television will 
play a part must keep this unique 
medium in mind at the point of con- 
ception. Most words adapt well. But 
those that don't should he changed. 

Following is a brief summary of 
principles which maj be helpful to the 
television copywriter who wants the 
words in his commercials to rise above 
the mob and be noticed: 

1. Keep the words simple. 

2. Avoid the overused varietv . 
There are plentv of everyday words 
that haven't \et heroine threadbare. 

3. Once \ou find a new word or 
phrase, don't sit back. Others will 
imitate \ou. It's a constant chase. 

4. Respect the words. Together 
with the pictures the success or the 
failure of \ our sales pitch depends 
upon them. 

5. Let the pictures carry themselves 
as far as possible, with the words only 
pointing them up. 

6. \\ ithout sacrificing pace, relax 
a little and tr\ to underwrite. A few 
pauses don't have to kill the com- 
mercial. 

7. Be suspicious of phrases that 
How too easil\ into \ our copy. Chance* 
are, you heard it said that way the 
night before. Formulas are insidious. 

8. When moulding words into a 
basic theme line, think first of tele- 
vision if television will ever pla\ a 
pari in the campaign. It is simple to 
adapt these words into advertisement*, 
but it can be murder in reverse. 

Products or services winch do not 
lend themselves to dramatic demon- 
strations cry the loudest for fresh- 
sounding word* to manufacture the 
excitement which the pictures them- 
selves cannot provide. For example, 
it is entirel) logical thai the viewer 
bv now i* getting a bit tired of *eeinj; 
models puffing on cigarettes. But when 
a famous person talks about the ciga- 
rette in a different way, wilh brighl 

and pergonal word*, they're bound to 

rale special noti< e. 

The old adage, "write like people 
lalk. cannot even be trusted am 
more. Driving From Detroit to Willow 
Bun recentl) with a friend in his fac- 
Lory-new automobile, I sensed the 
opportunit) to pick up some word* 
for a commercial. I asked him what 
he thought o 1 1 1 i s i a i . 

"Oh, it's rcallv tops," said he. "It's 



BO 



SPONSOR 



There is a 

DIFFERENCE 

between 

Radio and Radio 



Radio's immense strength . . . the opportunity to 
talk with masses of people frequently and economically 
... is employed fully only by advertisers who dis- 
tinguish between run-of-the-mill radio stations and 
great radio stations. 

There can be a tremendous difference between two 
stations in the same market. A station's programming, 
management, public service and facilities make it 
mediocre or good or great. A great station amasses 
huge and responsive audiences, because the character 



of its operation earns the confidence of its community. 
The radio stations we represent are great stations in 
important markets — stations whose character has 
earned them significant leadership. Their time is not 
cheap, but the solid values they deliver bring you the 
///// economy of radio. 

One of our experienced staff is always ready to discuss 
with you the application of great radio to your 
problem. 



the HENRY I. CHRISTAL co„ inc. 

NEW YORK — BOSTON — CHICAGO — DETROIT — SAN FRANCISCO 
Representing Radio Stations Only 



WBAL Baltimore (NBC) 
The Hearst Corp. 

WBEN Buffalo (CBS) 

Buffalo Evening Sens 

WGAR Cleveland (CBS) 

Peoples Broadcasting Corp. 

WJR Detroit (CBS) 

The Goodwill Station. Inc. 

WTIC Hartford (NBC) 

Travelers Broadcasting Service Corp. 

WDAF Kansas City (NBC) 
Kansas City Star 

24 JANUARY 1955 



^s on* 



Measure of a (J re at 
Radio Station 



WHAS 




WSYR 



WTAG 



Los Angeles (NBC) 
Earle C. Anthony Inc. 

Louisville (CBS) 

Louisville Courier-journal & Times 

Milwaukee (NBC) 
Milu auk I e Journal 

Schenectady (NBC) 
General Electric Company 

Syracuse (NBC) 

Herald-Journal & Post-Standard 

Worcester (CBS) 
Worcester Telegram-Gazette 



a hone) to drive. Best performance a 
car ever offered. And it has terrific 
styling this year, too. Ever see such 
a beautiful car?" 

Those words came straight from his 
heart. I'm positive he meant ever) 
syllable. All I could think of was. 
wouldn't that sound phon\ on tele- 
vision! It's just been said too many 
times before in the same manner. 

Will the pressure of volume which 
television demands ol ii^ creative peo- 
ple threaten to make impractical a new 
kind nl cop) quality? It shouldn't if 
the writer considers hi- contribution 



in selling more than just getting a 
basic idea and then "filling in the 
words. One additional draft of much 
of tin- m. .In., ii- i op\ now recited on 
telex ision might do it. In other words. 
its a new frame of mind rather than 
hours of additional work that can help 
the copywriter find those better words. 
Lets not be fooled b\ television 
campaigns which have succeeded in 
spite nl trite copy. Who is to sa\ that 
anj commercial, no matter how suc- 
cessful, would not have sold twice the 
goods had the copywriter tried a little 
hardei ? * • • 



metropolitan market 

IN POPULATION and RETAIL SALES 




- E aVm9andDrinWng\^Uons 

Pjaces^^ 
40 \ AKRON 



141 



SACRANAE^O 

pHOtNtt 



. HARTFORD 
[AM porlsrno^^ -_- 4 



EATING and DRINKING 
PLACES SALES 

Sales are high, and going higher, in 
local eating and drinking establish- 
ments. The cheery jingle of cash regis- 
ters is constant proof that Phoenicians 
like to "eat out" — like to enjoy a 
friendly glass with congenial com- 
panions. 

Is YOUR product profiting by this 
appetizing market? Let KPHO and 
KPHO-TV take your sales story to the 
most potent pocketbooks in the Phoe- 
nix area! You'll get gratifying results 
for your advertising dollars. 



SOLD 
reae+ied most effectively through 



KPHO-TV -KPHO 



Channel 5 • CBS Basic 
First in Arizona since '49 



Dial 910 • ABC Basic 
Hi Fidelity Voice of Arizona 



NOW 



AFFILIATED WITH BETTER HOMES and GARDENS • REPRESENTED BY KATZ 



RADIO BUILT STORES 

(Continued jrom page 50) 

"Our music programing has sure- 
fire appeal to the type of person who's 
interested in records, or concerts or 
plays. And the community events 
shows in Silver Spring create a good- 
neighhor feeling for our store there on 
the part of the residents. Almost e\er\ 
listener is a good prospect for one or 
the other of our products and ser- 
\ ices." 

The Felds' jump from prescriptions 
to phonograph records was more a 
stroke of luck than a premeditated bus- 
iness expansion. 

Soon after the Felds opened their 
drug store, they boughl $15 worth of 
popular records and played them for 
the lunch-counter customers. Almost 
immediately came demands for the 
records. 

After some fast rearranging a rec- 
ord counter was set up between the 
drugs and the notions and soon be- 
came the store's most crowded area. 
The Felds began ~t<>< -king more and 
more records until, today, the music 
department occupies about half of the 
original drug store. 

Sometime during this initial period 
of expansion one of the Felds decided 
it would he smart to ad\ertise. ""Our 
big record department made the place 
different from an ordinary drug store." 
says Israel Feld. "We wanted to tell 
people about it." 

There wasn t too much extra cash 
around for advertising, so the Felds 
looked for the most economical bu\ . 
In 1942 they launched their first radio 
venture, a 20-minute participation in 
a \\\\l)(! disk jockey program. The\ 
have been using music-and-chatter 
shows on radio ever since. Here's wh\ 
this t\pe ol programing has proven so 
effective: 

1. Broad adult appeal. Typical rec- 
ord-show audience consists of adults. 
ja//-happ\ teenagers who are natural 
< ustomers lor records as well as drug 
items. 

2. Flexible commercials. Hallmark 
of the d.j. show is its relaxed, informal 
commercial. The star often works 
from a fact sheet without written copy. 
Record business is unpredictable, often 
necessitates last-minute copj changes 
which are easil) made with this t\ pi- 
nt program. 

Commercial flexibility became even 
' Please turn to page ''2 I 



82 



SPONSOR 




MANAGEMENT 



.Measure 

of a Great 

Radio Station 



based on 



143 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN 
RADIO STATION OPERATION 



FIRST 

CHOICE 

in r 

FIRST RATE 
MARKET 



BEST Facilities 

I 
BEST Circulation 

I 
BEST Local Programs 



T 



BEST Production Service 

i | 

BESJ Customer Service 

I NBC Affiliate | 



5KW 



The ten people in management positions at WSYR apply to 
their jobs the judgment and skill acquired from a combined 
total of 143 years in the broadcasting business right here in 
Central New York. 

Each of them . . . from Company President to Traffic Manager 
. . . has spent an average of 14.35 years learning how to 
produce a superior broadcasting service in this particular market. 
WSYR's Director of Programming, for example, has been with 
the station 19 consecutive years; its Chief Engineer, 25 years; 
its Director of Sales, 15 years. 

These people do more than just operate a radio station. They 
serve their community . . . participate actively in its civic life 
. . . work hard in its social welfare causes . . . share the leader- 
ship of its churches and schools and chjbs. 

From long experience, WSYR's management serves the needs 
and tastes and public interests of a great service area which 
embraces a population of a million and half, with an annual 
buying power of two billions of dollars. 

That's why Central New Yorkers rely on WSYR more than on 
any other station. 

Get the Facts About WSYR from 
The HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO., Inc. 




SYRACUSE 



24 JANUARY 1955 



83 



STATION A-1.0°/« 

STATION B-l.5% 
STATION C-2.8% 




WDAY-91.7% 



WDAY polls 91.7% in 

THE 41 COUNTIES AROUND FARGO! 



T f 



HE Northwest Audit Company of Fargo 
has just completed a Rural Radio Survey in 
the Red River Valley Area. A double post- 
card was mailed to 3,200 rural families living 
within ISO miles of Fargo, in all directions. 

This question was asked each family: "To 
what one radio station does your family 
li-ten the most?" 

Twenty~five stations were mentioned in the 
returns. Of the 1681 replies, 1541 preferred 



WDAY! Rural listeners chose WDAY 32 to 7 
over the second-best station — 77 to 7 over 
all 24 other stations combined'. 

This survey, which covered 41 counties in 
North Dakota, Minnesota and South Dakota, 
is a perfect example of the almost unbeliev- 
able preference that WDAY enjo\s in this 
rich farming area. 



Gel all the facts from Free & Peters 
write us direct. 



or 



41f 



WDAY 

FARGO, N. D. 

NBC • 5000 WATTS • 970 KILOCYCLES 
FREE & PETERS, INC.. Exclusive National Representatives 



lighttime 24 January 1955 

UNDAY I MONDAY 




1 " "''. ; ' ',. ".'■ ,,' ,' 1\\,, 1V '\T it,-n.-..--i v •'■■ !'■"' *««'.■ 9«f»t> Rue. MrCann F-rlckion: ABC, 

!» 'ttilo «,.", Talent wm*?w- 'amaS ■■ " bom fOJ radio oolj. Anhauaar-Buwh. PaVd?: ABO, M-F oJO-aS pm 

M- quarter h«j.. IBO-IOJ >•„!., ...i|..r... SlflnMM NYC. other polrita. Arm»uf. H«n. Btml A M.-lionald: CBS. U-F 

"&•,!? ^** 7fi2 M| > 1 «<~ w-.biniw.. <M iWLIm ^"^'KSJEUrS'l MiffiS? tf oii"w B r. taitt: ABC, Sun 

*■ «. C- '>*££» 5 now.' .Wpi %6"u'Wtk»». !!»• «■" ulM " m " M0 ' ?* 8.nh"» W "ui. A Cuu.lhr Dram * I , . . * 

^^ark^^^^'^^^^Ts^^s^^i TS£% " r "" ;v " : Siiir -» * 

■UHjto <*»£!«■ „J or irr'rf'ih.'VrofrMU ^ W day Co " . e "„?"" c ."'*lT ./™t» BaYl" T.la'.haw,, aim NBC. M W:M did 
kljy.": . 8 -*»« OftiMfc M.»_B: P»i »• .*• ."•"'•iv'l™- Jt3?'m?Er -^ B, "' n ':„ OII V' *»'?"??'■ *BC. «»• • i"-» d»; 



■ lllr CraJiaaa. w r BannttC ABC. Bud 1:10-4 



CB3 Columbia. BKm CHS, ",n Sun T :80-B Dm ! 
Ch.,rol"I Motor i. «'*n>iiljFil l,»i)l-j: ..'(1- Ml _1_ 31 

Chrl.tlan S< Monitor. WaltonBulterfieldi AB(J 
Chureh ft Chrlrt. Martin A: Co.: ABC. Hun l-l*t 
CIO, Henry J KtufDun: ABC. M-F J fili Dm 
Coait Flthcrlat, Ljcn Baker:' NBC, M. W, J 
19. T. Th THM pm 



Frlildalra. FC4B CB8, Tu, Th. alt F 10 30- 

Slllttta, Man.n NBC, F 10 pm lo »nr] 

Slaroarena, Hlcka A Orelit; CBS, all F 10 10:15 



» n "Plne«ppl S , N 


W Ajrr: 


CBF F *:30- 


WMan In* 


WhlU Adt 


: ABC. Bun 








lub Dog Food, A 


our A Co 


Dli CBS, Sat 














Fda,. McCunn-l 




C. Tu-r 11- 








Co.. LtO Iturni- 










11 am: UBB 








l*j?m: C MD8 M 


.'" .™«T. 


on: ens. Pun 

1 1 ■ . i 

..... !.... 






Jann-Krlcmpn- 








Int., John Coh 


n: UBS, T, Th ll:30-« 


Irst.. McC*nn E 


"*!°",i, c " 


M. w. alt 



NT1C, To 3-8 30 pm 



Mutual of Omaha, Botill A Jar obi: UBS. Bun 
Mytmour A Cautlbarry. (Nultlllla). Din B 



armaro. DC8S' 


NBC M F BSD-, 3 p 


■ [Hi 






















Blow: CBS. Suo 3:3C 
















Bumari: CBS, tilt 


40-40 














BAB: Coroptoo. D-F-8. 




■*'r . *1 


m (ri 




o-Hs 




it: NBC, U-F 3-3:30 pm 




•Illy Good!. Qn 


I CBS. alt T K:(5-B pm 


Np>. (Iiiii 










Clau 




HB8, 






d. HurjilDi(.«i Paroalea 








ABC, 








litan-Purl 


• Co., 


Brawn: ABC. flit IOJ0 


11 am 



t nlani; SRC, Sal 9.30-10 pm: 



ITS: ABC. U-F 10-10:1 

: A&C. U F .10 am 
•r, DlilHldn A Brown: 



Valta at Pra B ti«,, 






SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S ['UUtee/l RADIO STATION 



waiting to HEAR from you . . 

118,560 families weekly! 
92,070 families daily! 
59,090 car radio families! 

* WDBJ s share of the tuned-in Roanoke audience 
averages 51 to 59%! 

• 25% of Virginia's total retail sales are made in 
the WDBJ area! 



AM • 5000 WATTS • 960 EC 
FM . 41.000 WATTS ■ 94.9 MC 



ROANOKE 



FREE A PETERS. INC.. No, 



WANT TO SELL 
CANADA? 

One radio station 

covers 40% of 

Canada's retail 



CFRB 

TORONTO 

50.000 WATTS, 1010 K.C. 



It for 40% of the retail tale: 
ahes CFRB your No. 1 buy i 
l'l No. 1 market. 



RESENTATIVES 



DEE RIVERS — 

n-.A 11 time-buyers 

GEORGIA'S 
WEAS 

ami its new 

50,000 -■''"" 

Mi stingl ■ u ■ ■ xsmttter 
on its same old frequency 

1010 

should be included 
in your Fall Budget. 

COVERAGE PRICE 

makes it Ceorgia's 
BEST 50,000 WATT BUY 



CALL STARS NATIONAL 

NEW YORK — CHICAGO 

DETROIT — LOS ANGELES 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Daytime 24 January 1955 



RADIO COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 



Daytime 24 January 195S 





of the 

San Francisco Bay Area's 
3,000,000 people are 
Foreign Language Speaking! 

They multiply, add, subtract and 
divide: THEY THINK! THEY BUY! 
in their own language! Sell them 
with KLOK the station that reaches 
them all. KLOK's specialised pro. 
gramming guarantees your message 
aHention.getting IMPACT! 

• SACRAMENTO 




KLOK 



P. O. So> 9*T Hole. Unl. 

5*1 J«0. CM Sal F-.nt.K6 

Repre»ent.d by Jofcn E P«-wn Co.. 



Henry C. Sitldorjf 
(Chairman of the Board) 
t,. IV. Basford Company 



LIKE MOST 
"Newsworthy" 
ADVERTISING 
EXECUTIVES 
Mr. SILLDORFF'S 
LATEST 
BUSINESS 
PORTRAIT 
IS BY... 



I'hotographers to the Basinen Executive 
565 Fifth Avenue, New York 17— PL 3-1882 



^^^Hiim'^jH 


U N D . 


k. Y 




MOO 


IDAY 






TUESDAY 






WEDNESDAY 




THURSDAY 






FRIDAY 




1 SATURDAY 




PP" - ^ 




iBSOrllap ' T 

Boynten S3S0 


Pulpit 


S60N ' m.w.r I 
D-f-B U2W 

m;n m.w.r i 
km ahrlASW 


Godfrey U0 mln 
Ptt.Mlk: Gardn 

BulflrMfi: Rati 
Bri in' Uj«ti 

Minn Mining. 
BBD0 m.w. .11 


N n-t L 






liadlre*' 10-11:1 

10-10:111 lit <J» 
Bl>la mi/ Rli 


o«».™.... 


MrBtlda 
Wada 


"Jrll!" I*'"! 


10-10 15 all dl 
BBDO m.n.ali I 


r"5r""i ""fc^r 


w'.iS"'" 


r.odtray'in-11 | 
Pet aflki Girdn 

Biglej Jlf« e'ii 
Kelloro Co 




Mary Margare 

N 10.10:05 
Oen Ml YA 


M 

S 'w r f" 1 !0 to"l* 


PotHtki atrdi 

Bntl-MfTi DCS 

Sioley Mf«: RA 


N lli-f 


Mam Mvqw 


T.ble Prodi C 

Haetar. Oleterle 
A Brown 


Lead & Grrwe *....■ 
"4 hr 1117 _ Mr Whli 

I31N 10 -53-11 ] 


- 


IS ""m-f m * 1 




Daw, m Jig ."o„i 

'!s!";T™' k'll'.'.. 


Cai-I Warren's 
Guoit Time 




W "m-t "* 1 


N m7 I 


N 10:05-15 




Carrallon Co 
Erwln, Waaoy 


Spaeo petrol 

Nestle Co 

319B olt wk 




^s% 




J'"lr°"\ 








Vain ef prophecy 

Prapbaej 

Wetter n ft SOD 


N I 


H --I 


N DOe, ^ , . 1 W, " L 




EtwIn."wJ.y* 1 ' 




Brat* the Ban 


fTlN t 


EW 128K 


Br-aV tht Bank 

IfiSH "mf ' T 
Woda M200 




ErwEn^wJay*' 


cUS.^f 


HI ..,.,, i. 


Sill Loke City 
Bill L City 1. 


Frank A Ernest 

87SN 7 
Gleeien |75n 


N 1 


Mom 'Chi tWI 


Make ue yr Mnd 


z^rvi-i 


Eotv $3500 


^SiP 


WeUi' A Gellei 
Loo Buraott 


H Engl, newi 


! ";cj,.':,.""; 


M«- w ' "i..'V,, 's"r- 






Eity 




WflM A Gelle 


Queen for a daj 


Collate 
Eity 

Second CJiint. 
N m-f I 
The Thrao Planl 


Morta >ahrlS7' 


Godfrey leont'dl 


^.""mV"' 


Col Ml* 


Robt Q Lovli 

N L « ID! 11 11 1 






.mRl" 






Reviewing "srand 


r ™f ""; 


H— ™ 


Your Neighbor 1 ! 
Voice 


Ch m f I L'tniincnul liku 


"J°"j 


•#-g| 






Quean far a day 
LIN mare 14500 


Eity mi 12500 


Queen for o day 

550B tu.th 1 
Cohan Hi, 15500 


E?ty 


'rH',"Jt' 




Eity '" """" 

The Thrao Plant; 




A,,.!..... 


^ Halani Curtll 

awAs «h 

1200 




Q T n J,'l 1 '.ru' J 


^.'i'mon, 




HT-im Ed " ,on 




«,«.; 


P *° i.^mon'T 


^ City By.LIno 


J-Clly By-Line 




II I.AT 


.'8 ~w 


ir^iZ L , 


£3"Zt 


lit ''■'••""" 


;H : .irrzr 


jjfaSS- 


gTSw 


LAN 


Seeand Ctianao 
Th* Threa Plant 


""*" " ! 




The Leading 


Wish L 
Bill Cunningham 


rti» ittrntl light 


IS V " , " t I ln ° L 


Wondy Worren 

FCAB 13000 

Helen Trrnt 


.J-3S 


" 


Valentino 


P40, CorjBtor 


Fm.ik tl,,. 1).-,!.. 


""■™" 


N V "m n 'f lM I 


pH"' f."4.".' 


Helmety'i 


■VST* 


■ T "*ll("l> J 


Helen Tront 


Woda 




N """',"" L 


r\r,. Comnton u ui-i 1 


-us* 


isua? ■"; 


Larry La Sueur 
N 1 


IHCITaa | 
rSJJil 

Olffli, p| 




Frank Fariell 
N m-f I 




Frank. Firrell 
13:10-30 


Frank Fu-rell 
N m-f t 


Fr!nk Fa/rell 
N m-f L 


jatj^ 




F £;.vr„, 


.^, 


0»»o ot 
rloimeay'i 


H 


at ml L 

ml UU-I 


KV,, ol ,," m Ti 


fcab"" """' 


Cb mi L 


^■hp itm 


Gearaa Hunu 


W^-* 


mjp. 


Burnett ' S2800 
Our sol Sunday 
Whltebl: anaclnt 


-..Mr 


2"-'"" 


Cb m t 1. 

No network 


""••E™" 


iP? 


&» 


L-.rU-""' 


s,a"K 


■us- 


Our gol Sundiy 


* wV.?" '"""V 


Gommeke 


Caontr> , 9 


c^ure. of cbiH 


Capitol 
N L 


K T 

Century Ad* 
Ho* Chr SelTnce 


Youth Want* 




B-F-S m ' 13250 


N ui-f I. 

S T ° m-t" * L 


■jfj- 


C mT L 

Ted Molone 


dSnplin"'™""" 


C F "X n "' 


-^ 


Paul Harvey mm 
3 m-f L 






"■■5P" 




Hg& 




-J»- 


T!"S!T 


Rj.it of life 


; '^-- 


-us- 


■J-- a 


City Haioltai 
I1SN l:°5-30 I 








^fJj-"^S, 


."^"a 


Ted Molone 


SaroTa 

Ted Staala 
N m-f I 




Luncheon at 
N m-f L 


T * d oo*op l<m * 


rr-f°rs-.™sjs> 




1BK -»,"" L nTf";,,:"". 


N ui-f L 

N m-l L. 


o^BaiOrtla hsco 


Robert Trout 
CE 1550 

Syncopation 
IS L 






: * I. 




D F-9 




168N' "m'-T' L 
ComolM 1IS50 


r'" v w""* 


m-f 


Co'inpton, Blow 


» T, i-r- 


Reporting 


•"..sir 


W r'lio* mnoj 


Ted Steele 
« m-f L 


r ; T?""t 


N °.."lcV" k 


Young DrMalana 


7*3?: 


■"-sr 




Reporting 




|H\ L 


SpJx 


Guiding light 
>AO: dur, l.'y 




GulrJIni light 
3 t0: duo. iTon 
:oniot»fr 13000 


•'ZmvtJn™ 


Guiding light 


Guiding light 




Symphenette 


•• L 


The Cathollt 


N "-fF" 


P*«: title 


\'Jfl. NL&B 
m-f SUS-30 

Wonderful City 


"•■ST 


•"..ar 


HHAMe** m0r 


rT'?!-'""',. 


"■ir" 


"rn'-'f"* 




""'Love/* ' 
N m-f L 

Snm~Hnye. n-,i 
lirofl F.l« 

NLAR 


•■sF* 


*°-rF* 




N m-f 1. 
Ivrafi F.li 


•jr* 


K '.»r 


1ai Armnur Urt0 " 


""Vapoi* 


Kudner 115. Of* 


Var " 1 




■ 




Perry Maion 
PAO tide 


^Hwhii* li nan 


,,,-,.„* 


'"",""'1 


1 Winn at 


Ne» York 


Anthology 
« L 


DPS m'w.f 12900 
Martin Block 


Nero Drake: 

Brl.lol-My.r,. 

0C5S: Ton. 

-Va\Q $3000 

f4« nsso 


Shellah Graham 

y't th 1,l ; n .3# n'i. 
Welntroub JS00 

S 'l^T 


Briitol-Myort, 

Trnil Co. WAO 


Wonderful City 


Shaw 

J l-*T 


N Tn'. D rn" 


Show 


Ton! Co 
v.Tloa T Gallar 


N LeW 


Tnni Ct. 


Teddy Wilun 

Show 

N 1 


Rlrh.fJ K.... 




Wonderful City 


a-W -1 




Wonderful City 


n _ Army »M ( 




BrtiMgr d«y 


^Hoantury tlWO 


m.f ta t£i 


Brighter day 


Brighter day 


IKJ« . I. s 


*&• 


Wondtrful City 
i T 


Weekend 
'or IJL-T 


> <* bra per «rt 

JBtB 

1 14 bfi per n* 


-j u "l 

' lV J2800 


-vr- 


'rlnole-Gtrtthelf ' 
Woman [n 


Martin Black 


PhiTm»m M 
111S !.th L 
1CSS eh I2B00 




w Ti". '" 


' m"7 ' LAT 


Hilltop hou,.^ 


"" 


£S||w 


Martin Block 


DCSS ' in S2B0O 

i-3a M 3*i t s-so T 


Ruby Mercer 


Wonuln 
NT L 




Hilltop houie 
*yf t" nnl 

■ tto A •orro 

Mall la, 

K ai-r t 




Lmi 


* Opera " 


Strlno 




' 




':'N \ is'-ao t 
IBOO q,.« r 

H8 niSO-Js""! 

a toooo 

1« H-hra m-ti. 


ifton 




.„...,,„, 




rJZBS, ( 




1411 B "«7M 


sprS' 


^p£5* 


PAO BajDOJ-.mnrt 




»*a:rainoT,uu»t 




Mike & BufF'i 
^ Mall Bag 




r 1 "-:, 3 ""''. 


.Ts ""aooo 


;»aSf 


Unit Sag 


Hike A Buff* 
Mall Bag 




Rt to bapolaeu 
PAO- draft tide 


w ■hhr m* 


Is^r-H' 




On ■ Sundey 

Afternoon 

iVifH IAT 

i-8:BB 


, B* ,. 


ttJM 


Latin Quarter 
Betty Cracker 


"Vffi" 


Bruce A Don 
» m-f L 


■■*. R S2500 


I LAT 


■atr 


,=-•„*, °-v 


?;:!",',■;„ -',';, 


Latin Quarter 
Batty Crocker 


.■""•^"•V 


Bi.kit.of *ltg 


Matlrleo ' 
N TS so" T 


"■ST 


Bruce A Dan 


™"'r'„r 


2 ? :S'» 


_ Nova aus-s 




'H'.sfur 


"sr 


Sr 


SaJuf. to »l 
Wlib ' 

Start) PinJi 
Pblla ' 




i-F-S ' ilHOO 


Wfrllnf""^'^ 


D.F-s""'' """" 




Ple'rHnf D Dru« 


H omSs 1 &&. 


m S !v.V'"co r inonl 




_ Nick Carter 

new 




Itarllno Dmii 
i-F-B ' M800 




Traaiury 

Benditartd 
I I.AT 


a r ffl: v J!fS 


, '-'"%, 


~S 


Bruce A Din 


«^._„„, 




Bandttand 
B LAT 




1:""-S 


g»s 


SBAw"* a0a> 




Nfanhatian '™'* 


R h Aibtr ii5no 


1 ""'„',"" t 


■f 


■'" ■ '■■'■ 

iVnnrtt 1SS0 

On a Sunday 

r^ 5 




■T " LAT 


!— «— » 


""•"T* 


Bnllby Benian 


latao ' i2a00 
SUN m-f L 


Musical ElproH 


•jj- 


of the Yukon 
I Tllden I4IS0 




"■' Bobby Benian 

m-f t. m . 
• LA* 


lu,t Pl.l. B ||l 


Fred Back 
I m'f T 


"■ST 


KrirTJuo 

nlSi 




< m f > 




Bobby Benton 


Jcirt Plain BUI 

Eaty '"* '"' 
Hotel for p^s 

It t*ljr» ta b* 
■arrtaet 


'•■ """"«' 


c:::.. 


■M.%1 1 




'""r".-.;""' Fred B«k 
;Tty' "** n " ,n ' 1 Sh m*f T 


Lareni-o Jonoi 

Eitv 
Holol for ivi, 
Ooait Pliherlc. 

Lynn Baker 
II Pun to bo 

otoTTlad 
B m f t 
W« l*t" Ptax* | 


^sr^. 


r *Show" 
H m-f : 




... c °'"" 


Fred Beck 

I m7 T 


I mf T 
Gloria Parker 


. ■ 






Mrtlnarr A 


ill* S ' 6B '* 


^H Cr-.lMt Stary 


r mw'f' "l 


rlr. Jolly-i Hotel 


Q lor la Porker 
Vlneenl Lopet 


NT "* ' 1 


v°"";,r k ", 




1 


^Jtv^Veer'Tire 


' m« t *"" "** *■ 


'oya Da Married 

Jyburg Ad* 

Phe Threa Planl 


torn t. u 
■yburg Adv 






Vlne.nl level 


Vlnaoat Looai 

N n-r 


■-l" . l» • 




|^Bcudnor turn 






^• Ttiraa Plant 


Vlneant Lopai 
>J m-f t 




so. 


L 




DELIVERS MORE FOR THE MONIES 



These five inland radio stations, purchased as a unit, give you 
more listeners than any competitive combination of local 
stations . . . and in Inland California more listeners than the 
2 leading San Francisco stations and the 3 leading Los 
Angeles stations combined . . . and at the lowest cost per 
thousand! (SAMS and SR&D) 

Beeline listeners in this independent inland market spend 
over $3 billion annually at retail, nearly a billion annually 
for food alone. (Sales Management's 1954 Copyrighted 
Survey) 



WCLATCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

\CRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 




24 JANUARY 1955 



91 



RADIO BUILT STORES 

(Continued from page 82) 

more important a factor in t lie Felds 
ad requirements as the) widened their 

horizons to the c :ert field. 

"Tickets for our concerts are avail- 
able onl) at our four stores, and at the 
auditorium itself." says frvin Feld. 
"Just before the concert, we keep an 
hour-to-hour record of ticket sales. If 
sales are slow, we throw commercials 
on the concert into all <>ur shows. We 
toss awaj the rule book — promote 
long-hair concerts mi Negro spiritual 



shows and so forth. 

" i nu can do this soi I oi eleventh- 

hour change on a d.j. show. And it 
sure helps fill the seats!" 

The chatter-and-music format also 
allows [he Feld- to ballyhoo their con- 
certs and plays b) having stars appear 
OH the shows for interviews. In addi- 
tion to these special interviews, the 
events are promoted through regular 
program announcements. Spiritual 
concerts, for example, are ad\ertised 
for six days in advance. Attendance 
at a single concert in Griffith Stadium 
has reached as high as 23.000. Com- 




whose beak holds more 
than his belly can . . . 

That's an old Cajun saying round 
South Louisiana .... interpret it 
any way you wish! However, we 
want to reassure you that there're 
more people than pelicans in the 
South Louisiana area that WAFB- 
TV covers — some 600,000 people. 

WAFB-TV has 200,000 watts to beam out your sales message not only 
to the 9 parishes in the Baton Rouge trade area with an annual buying 
income of #450,000,000 — but also to many outlying South Louisiana 
cities, including Opelousas, New Iberia and Lafayette. 




POWER? 



200,000 watts. Enough to 
prompt one of our viewers 
150 miles away to write us, 
and we quote: ". . . reception 
couldn't be clearer if we 
were sitting right on top of 
WAFB-TV!" 



To put your sales message 
across to the non-pelican 
population of South Louisi- 
ana, get the facts you need 
from: 

ADAM J. YOUNG, JR., INC. 
National Representative 

TOM E. GIBBENS, 

Vice President & Cen. Mgr. 



PROGRAMS? 

Top rated shows from ABC, 
CBS, and Dumont along 
with our own impressive 
local shows keep folks in this 
rich market area watching 
from sign-on to sign-off! 




WAFB-TV 



BATON ROUGE, LA. 




menials on the summer entertainment 
series run for a month prior to open- 
ing night: individual plays get week- 
long advance promotion. 

The Felds' air schedule today in- 
cludes almost cinht hours a week of 
music programing on WWDC. There 
are show- ever) day of the week, with 
specially hea\ \ programing on Sun- 
das. \ 15-minute record -how is aired 
across-the-board in the evening; a two- 
and-a-half-hour d.j. pro-ram is broad- 
cast Saturdays and there are two sep- 
arate half-houi Negro Spiritual hroad- 
casts Sunda\ mornings. In addition, 
the Felds sponsor a SO-minute Super 
Parade of Mils show Snnda\ after- 
noons and run about 72 30-second an- 
nouncements throughout the week. 

The 30-second announcements are 
unusual in that the) don't sell any- 
thing; instead, the) give awa\ money. 
The Felds have been running these 
"Lucky Number" announcements for 
the past live years, feel they're "more 
effective than any -ales pitch could 
be." 

"" I he announcements create a lot of 
talk about our stores and our other 
enterprises," Israel Feld says. "They 
stimulate excitement, keep our name 
before the public." 

Luck) Number announcements in- 
volve a series of numbers read by an 
announcer. If a listener can match 
the numbers with an identical series 
on a dollar hill he is awarded any- 
where from $50 to S500 in cash. 

These announcements actually re- 
flecl the Felds" business philosoph) as 
a whole and the principle bv which 
the) grew. "Give a person something 
lor nothing even if it's something of 
relatively low value and you've won 
a customer and a friend. People are 
always looking for bargains. We make 
it a point to offer speeial- and prem- 
ium- all the time." 

A commercial on a '><"*• package of 
fireworks, for example, offered "'two 
big free gifts that ever) child will 
want." Another commercial invited 
listeners to "select an) two 7!! rpm 
phonograph records or 15 rpm phono- 
graph records' and gel a "beautiful 
seven-inch gold luster serving dish'" 
free, \jnother one involved a t\ an- 
tenna "'thai ha- been -old ever) where 
up io $7.50," now offered al $1.69. 

Response to the offers? "Bettei than 
"in fondesl hopes, l-i ael I el, I -,i\ -. 

"fin example, we offered a pen and 

pencil -ei w iili ,i I iee blotter for $] .''<"> 
on radio. I he offei wa- made l"i 



92 



SPONSOR 




ME? A HOG CALLER? 



(HEAVEN FORBID! 



SAYS MR. T. V. McREACH 



Of course not! T. V. McReach is a well-bred 

fellow, with a carefully modulated voice and 
exquisite manners. But old-timers hereabouts 

remember the old McReach family of North Texas. 

His father, Old Man McReach, was the champion 

hog caller in the sreet. And from McReach, 
senior, young T. V. got a basic 
philosophy: "If you can be heard 
far enough, if you call 

convincingly, and if you 
offer something they want, you 
can count on them to come." 

You do all three with WFAA-TV's Long Reach 

(274,000 watts). And get this: TV sets in this 
rich market have increased 33.8%* in 
the last twelve months. 

"This is worth looking into," says T. V. McReach. 

Get the details from your Petry man. 



"Broadcasting -Telecasting 
December 6. 1954 



&6a*t*te/ 



WFAA-TV 

DALLAS 

NBC — ABC — DUMONT 



RALPH NIMMONS, Station Manager 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., National Representative 

Television Service of The Dallas Morning News 



24 JANUARY 1955 



93 



,1 six-week period on WW IK. only. 
We sold 10,000 sets a- a result." 

— - 1 « » - . i.il offers "ii i adio e\ en help 
sell concert tickets for the Felds. \n\- 
one \\li<> purchases an advance ticket 
for a spiritual concert, for instance. 
i an gel a spiritual song book for 25< . 
W lien the Felds book a summer sea- 
son Hi plays, ballets ami oncerts at 
the Carter Barron Amphitheatre, the) 
promoted "Value Books ol »im-ihi 
tickets l"i vveekda) nights. Tin- I k- 



The BIG 
Independent 



In The 
BIG City 



contained coupons good fur free seat? 
.,<l jacent to the paid seat. 

The Felds sold out their complete 
-link ol Value Hooks in two weeks. 

"Radio gives excitemenl and urgen- 
cy to our offers, lr\ Feld believes. 
"When a person hears a d.j. or an- 
nouncei talking about a special deal, 
he wants to go out and get it right 
away. It's especiallj effective when 
the d.j. himself does the pitch." 

• * * 



A 





In The 
BIG State 



TfXAS LARGEST 

FULL TIME 

INDEPENDENT 

STATION 



hLltS i 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 

5000 WATTS 

ON 610 



on Every 
Dial 



ASK THE WALKER REPRESENTATION CO 



INC. 



SPOT RADIOS PUSH 

[Continued from page 39) 

lions ol dollars worth of brand-name 
merchandise." 

The main bod) ol the presentation 
make- a number of basic points about 
spot radio's size and scope: 

1. Spot radio can handle easik the 
-i\ biggest assignments admen can 
assign to it: seasonal sale- campaigns. 
sectional promotions to fit distribution 
patterns, supplemental \ campaigns to 
backstop other advertising, supporting 
push for sampling or test campaigns, 
saturation drives, and raising the level 
ol product acceptance. 

2. Spot radio, says the >l! \. i- ""as 
big as all ol Vmerica penetrating 
everywhere. Highlighl facts: one or 
more radios in over 98'. of I . S. 
homes: an average toda\ of two-and- 
a-half radio sets per faniilv : almost 
three hours of listening per home per 
da\ : radios in over 29,000,000 auto-: 

i ontinuing sale- of radio sets in u 
areas. 

.'■5. Spot radio- -real (lexibilit) and 
wide range of local program Inns 
mean that advertisers can use it to 
,:hic\c greale-l ad\erti-ing efficiency, 
particularl) where brand preference 
or local tastes \ar\ widely. The pres- 
i ntation punches home tin- example: 
"In Columbus, Ohio. 18.2', of the 
families hu\ corned heel hash. Hut 
in the nation's capital, the percentage 
is more than double. On the other 
hand, in Washington onlj 19^5 are 

dog owner- while Phoenix lias more 

than double thai percentage. 

I rges the SKA : 

"Don't spread yoursell so thin that 
your budgets become ineffectual. Re- 
duce the number of media. Enlarge 
your use of the only one that is \ir- 
tuall) 1(1(1' < national in coverage 
spot radio and make sure all your 
prospects hear you plainly, over and 
over, exactlj where you want and 
when you want. 

The It ill: According to is president, 

Ke\in B. Sweenex. the Radio Adver- 
ti-ing Bureau will pla\ a major role 
in promoting spot radio in 1955. 

\n increased percentage of the in- 
dustr\ group's over-$750,000 budget 
ihi- year is now slated to go into a 
-die- of spot radio presentations 
based on original research projects 
conducted l>\ R VB. \» outlined t.> 

SPONSOR, these projects will include a 

series "I" comparisons between radio 



94 



SPONSOR 






ON THE AIR FROM 7A.M. TO 1 A.M 




24 JANUARY 1955 



95 



and other media, su< li as newspapers, 
magazines and television. RAB also 
plans to explore further the influence 

of radio in consumer brand selections, 
the number of housewives who tune 
their car radios on the waj to market- 
ing and the cumulative effects of ra- 
dio program audien< es. 

Such research is expected to pro- 
\ idc considerable industry ammunition 
for spot radio. Earlier checkups by 
I! \ll. when it was BAB, have shown, 
for example, that 21 spot announce- 
ments per week in radio in the 185 
largesl metro markets can reach 13' - 
of tlie population an average of 2.3 
limes per week— a total of <"> 1,800,000 
weekly impressions at a \ ear-long cost 
of some $2,000,000 b\ today's rates. 

I! \B is current!) putting the finish- 
ing touches on the first of its new spot 
presentations, ''Spot Radio vs. News- 
papers." \ few weeks ago. it was pre- 
\iewed for 95 executives from the 13 
major rep firms that are R \B mem- 
bers. 

This presentation, as outlined brief- 
l\ li\ the RAB's Dave Kimble, is "spe- 
• ifi<allv slanted at air clients with 
selective marketing problems. By this. 
Kimble means such industn categories 
as soft drinks, food brands, seasonal 
products and the like that face local- 
level competition ranging from prac- 
tical nothing to the stifTest kind of 
product rivalry. 

I in such clients, the KM! presenta- 
tion states, spot radio is an ideal 
medium. \- compared with news- 
paper-: spot radio offers advertisers the 



advantage of greater flexibility, more 
thorough market coverage, memora- 
bility and lower cost-per- 1,000. 

Apart from it- upcoming presenta- 
tions. RAB is promoting spot radio 
through other channels as well. The 
industry group has been working 
closely with the semi-social Radio and 
Television Executives Society in or- 
ganizing a weekl) series of spot semi- 
nars attended b\ \e\\ ^ oik agency- 
men. This spring. RAB will also take 
over most of the duties of Crusade for 
Spot Radio, an offshoot of the SRA, 
and expects to assign as many as nine 
contact men to call on air clients with 
spot radio presentations. 

I».».» soles tactics: Among most of 
the larger rep-, the emphasis in daily 
selling and periodic presentations this 
\ear will be on radio's traditional 
values, although a considerable effort 
will be made to tailor spot radio cam- 
paigns loi particular client needs. 

Some special projects, however, are 
in the work- : 

Henry I. Christal: In 1953 this 
rep firm sponsored a valuable survey 
of radio use in tv markets. Field work 
was done b\ Alfred Politz. The study 
-bowed, for example, that the majority 
of tv owners still looked to radio as 
their primary, reliable source of im- 
portant news. According to Irving 
Gross, sales promotion manager, the 
rep firm now contemplates doing more 
studies in the qualitative aspects of 
-pot radio. Said Cross: "We mav do 
a special study on the use of radio in 



multiple-set homes to find out how 
much listening is missed in ordinary 
radio measurement." 

\ BC Spot Sales: The use of spot ra- 
dio as a "basic advertising medium" is 
the theme of a current series of trade 
ads from this rep firm designed to 
reach executives at the "decision-mak- 
ing" level. Each ad plays up a specific 
"case history" use of spot radio by a 
well-known advertiser. As Hank Shep- 
ard, new^ business and promotion man- 
ager, describes the ad scries, it is sup- 
posed to "pre-condition top executives 
and implant a more favorable atti- 
tude toward spot radio." 

Spot radio campaigns of firms like 
Mueller's Macaroni. Anahist, Sunshine 
Biscuit. Pontiac. Regent Cigarettes and 
Esso are profiled in the ad series. Ba- 
sic uses of spot radio by these firms — 
flexible coverage for regional advertis- 
ers; seasonal saturation campaigns 
during bad- weather months; spot pro- 
graming that can be merchandised — 
ire stressed. 

Reprints of these trade ads are being 
mailed by NBC Spot Sales to a long 
list of management and corporation 
executives to broaden their impact as 
"door-openers"" for NBC Spot sales- 
men. 

"Nearlj all of the in-person presen- 
tations we'll make in 1955 will be care- 
fully tailor-made to the requirements 
of prospective clients," Shepard told 
SPONSOR, "but much of the 'education- 
al' job will have been done in ad- 
vance, we feel." 

Katz Agency: According to Maurice 



r 



NABISCO 



UDILLAC 






ttlOWW" 



^Q 



Business is 

SPOTTY at 



DR. LYONS 

/) % 




THE NEW SOUND IN CINCINNATI 
WITH THE CASH REGISTER RING! 



and we LOVE IT! 

Put your spots on the station 
that ,x SPOTS" Cincinnati 
for national advertisers. 



GORDON BROADCASTING COMPANY, 
Notional R e p r » l e n I a t i v t , WEED 





96 



SPONSOR 



A new kind of programming, a new kind of listening, a new 
and exciting success with audiences and advertisers is yours 
on NBC RADIO. 

POSITIVE PROGR \\I\II.\G 

To its roster of great personalities heard daily, NBC RADIO 
adds one of Vmei ica's ten most influential people, Dr. Norman 
Vincent Peale— availal>lc for the first time to mli citisers. 

I)|{. PEALE IS HEARD EACH WEEKDAY MORNING 10:05-10: I 5 EST. 

Dr. Peale is a man who has already won an audience of over 
30,000,000 homes through his regular look Magazine ar- 
ticles, his syndicated newspapei column, hi* speeches and his 
books. His latest, THE POWER OF POSITIVE THINKING, is fast 
becoming the most important book ol our generation— it has 
been #1 on best seller li^N for more than two years. 

Programming of important personalities who have huge 
follow ings has proven its appeal in Man Margaret McBride's 
daily chats. Sold out for ueekda) segments, it was extended 
to weekends by popular demand of listeners and advertisers. 
Dr. Peale immediately follows Miss McBride: together they 
provide a programming order unmatched in day-time 
listening impact. 

POSITIVE LISTENING 

Dr. Peale each day answers questions from listeners on 
problems of personal, everyday life, acting as guide and 
counselor. Out of his rich experience and wisdom he brings 
inspiration to lift the In-art and practical, useful steps to help 
in working out problems. 

POSITIVE BIN l\G 

The Norman Vincent Peale program can be of immense value 
to acceptable advertisers. Dr. Peale is a nationally-known 
figure of impressive stature and personal following. His pro- 
gram in NBC Radio's effective new format is available for 
sponsorship one to five days a week at amazingly low cost. 

Here is a truly outstanding advertising opportunity. . .of that 
you can be positive. Get all the facts from your NBC Radio 
Network representative today. 




RADIO 



a service of I 



THE 

POWER 

OF 

POSITIVE 




24 JANUARY 1955 



97 






If Your Market is 

MINNEAPOLIS 

ST. PAUL 

NOW 

IS THE 

TIME 



to see your 



television representative 

. . . about choice availabil- 
ities on KEYD-TV 

...you can buy maximum 
power at minimum cost 
on the Upper Midwest's 
new Channel 9 station 

. . . ask your H-R man 
about KEYD-TV's "in- 
centive" rates 

316,000 WATTS 





Offices, Studio*, Transmitter 

FOSHAY TOWER 

Minneapolis 
Represented Nationally by H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



Kellner. radio sales manager, the Katz 
rep firm ma\ order special Pulse 
studies during L955 which show how 
main more listeners-per-set spot radio 
counts at night as opposed to daytime 
radio. In addition. Katz executives 
expect to intensify their efforts to set 
up general!) similar disk jockey shows, 
with similar merchandising tie-ins. on 
main Katz-repped stations. Basic 
plan: to offer advertisers shows in 
several markets with similar audiences 
as vehicles lor saturation campaigns. 

From other reps and sales organi- 
zations, advertisers can expect to see 
a nuinher of 1 *Joo presentations based 
on various "package" plans or rate 
streamlining. 

Here are some notewortln examples: 

Quality Radio Croup: Bill Ryan, 
ex-BAB executive who now head's 
QRG's organization, recently started a 
round of calls on media directors of 
the top 20 U.S. ad agencies to spell 
out the group s story . 

Here's the gist of what Ryan has 
been discussing: 

1. QRG will soon be offering a se- 
ries of taped nighttime radio programs 
aired on a "network" of approximate- 
ly 36 large stations. These shows will 
be selected by a program screening 
committee that includes Dick Pack of 
Westinghouse, Carlos Franco of Cros- 
ley Broadcasting and Don Hamilton 
of WOR. 

2. The same show will he aired in 
all of the QRG markets, although time 
-lols may vary locally. Advertisers 
who bin a -how on the full lineup can 
expect an appreciable reduction be- 
low the published rate for gross time 
on the individual stations. 

3. One of QRGs key points is radio 
coverage. Although the group is not 
an interconnected network, its cover- 
age — as Ryan describes it — will soon 
resemble one. QRG is now adding 
about a dozen more stations to its 
list; litis would bring the combined 
coverage of the 36 stations to the 
level of some 90* < of the I . s . 

John Blair Co.: Main spot radio 
admen have heard about the Blair 
"\ VIS \ T" plan. As of niid-Januai \ . 
the basic presentation for it had been 
-how n to 34 major clients, ranging 
from Armstrong Cork to Yick Chemi- 
cal, and to more than 00 ad agencies. 

Bui some new NATSAT develop- 
ments are simmering, and will soon 
he reflected in the pitches made b\ 
Blaii salesmen: 

1. Executives of the Blair firm are 



working out final details of a series 
of "customized" presentations which 
will be made to advertisers in various 
basic industry categories. These cate- 
gories include autos, cigarettes and in- 
surance companies. The point of these 
presentations: to show advertisers how 
NATSAT can dovetail with basic ad 
campaigns of various types. "Well 
show an auto advertiser, for example, 
how NATSAT can reach his customers 
through more than 13,000,000 auto 
radios in its coverage area," explained 
Blair's radio sales v. p.. Bob Eastman. 

2. The slide presentation that's been 
used to sell \ ATS VI has been dupli- 
cated in a booklet-sized reference book 
which timebuyers and admen can keep 
on file. Also in the works: a uniform 
merchandising campaign which will 
be an integral part of the NATS VI 
package. "We've spent a lot of time 
developing one that really adds a new 
dimension to NATSAT." added East- 
man, "and we expect to add it to our 
sales presentations in the near future. 

At the moment, the NATSAT plan 
calls for 24 announcements per week 
per station on "around" 45 Blair- 
repped radio outlets I the size of the 
list changes occasionally). Cost: $13,- 
71M.60 per week on a year-round basis. 

Avery -Knodel: Salesmen from this 
rep organization are currently calling 
on agencies to promote a price adjust- 
ment of one of their repped outlets 
which may set a pattern for other 
\\ery-Knodel stations. 

Called "Realistic Pricing Method," 
the formula is now the official rate 
structure of k\YZ. Houston. "RPM" 
ties the costs of minute announcements 
ver\ closely to the station's percentage 
share of audience I according to Pulse 
studies l throughout the day. 

Prime lime slots on KXYZ are now 
from 6:30 a.m. to noon, and from 
5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Other times are 
lower-priced. 

Donald Cooke: A Cooke-repped sta- 
tion. Hoi [tester's W BBF. is using a new 
price formula which will be a feature 
of the rep firm's sales tactics in 1955. 

"Our other stations are watching 
the experiment very closely, Don 
Cooke told SPONSOR. "If it is a six- 
er--, several may change over to it. 
We've had plcnh of interest in the 
plan from agencies and advertisers 
with whom we've discussed it." 

The plan works out like this : 

Advertisers are guaranteed a mini- 
mum Pulse rating of .">.() and a 30'. 
share of audience. The cost-per-an- 



98 



SPONSOR 




ow to clear 
op a <v picture 



Back in the L870's a I. inner near Monticello, 

[owa, developed an inordinate yen for 

turke) giblets. To gratify it he started killing 

off his turke) flock, first one a day. then two, 

and finally, when the habit readied .hug proportions. 

ten a day. The pile of Eeathers grew so high 

feathers were coining out of Ins ears; one d.r. 

he loaded them all onto a wagon and 

headed for town. 

"What you got in the wagon, bub?' 

the man at the store ashed. 



"Turke) feathers." 

"Why?" 

"Danged if 1 know. Reckon 
they good for anything?'" 

"Yup." 

"What?" 

"Dusters." 

"What you gimme for the 
whole load ? 

"Six bits or a turkey." 

"Got any gihlets on him? 

"Yup." 

" 'Sadeal." 



And that's how the duster indus- 
try was started in Monticello. 
Iowa. Today as many as 16.000 
feathers per day are washed, 
disinfected and moth-proofed, 
before 80 to 200 are selected for 
one of the twenty different 
models made in Iowa and dis- 
tributed all oyer the Western 
Hemisphere. 



Carried to extreme-, leather dusters might 

eventually take the place of vacuum cleaners 

and therein eliminate one source of 

t\ picture interferes e. 



WMT-TV 



Chonncl 2 

1/ nl add) 



100,000 watts 
I edar Kai 



National Reps: The Katz Agency 



24 JANUARY 1955 



99 



nouncement is based on these figures. 

If the rating level of a purchased 
time slol is below the 5.0 mark, the ad- 
vertiser can selecl other slots mil il the 
cumulative rating adds up to 5.0. 

CBS Radio Spot Sales: Said Sher- 
ril \\ . Taylor, sales promotion man- 
ager of CBS Radio Spot Sales: 

•"\\ e feel that most of the agencies 

who control big broadcast billings 

nize the uses to which spot radio 

ran be put and are in favor of tin* 

medium. 

"The problem of 'educating' admen 
in spot radios basic values lies there- 
fore w iili the client. \\ e now have 
three contact men in our Sales Devel- 
opment team who will spend most ol 
their i ime calling directlj on clients 
usuall) with the blessing of the cli- 
ents agency — to discuss spot radio 
'basics'. ' 

I he chiel promotional weapon pre- 
pared for L955 use |p\ CBS spot sales- 
men i- a slide presentation entitled 
"Hear Ye! Hear Ye!" Recentlj un- 
veiled before 22 top General Foods 
executives, the presentation is ear- 
marked for showings before clients 
and agenc) executives throughout the 
industry - 

"1 tear Ye!" parallels spot radio - 
role to that of the colonial Tow n Crier. 
State- the presentation "In the old 
days, the quickest and best means ol 
reaching lots and lots of people was 
the Town Crier. Then, as now. the 
human voice was the most effective 
means ol communication." 

In its review ol spot radios L955 
size and dimension-, the presentation 
points out that '"in a typical week 



an average 



12,880,000 home- spend 

of 2<l hours and 10 minutes with ra- 
dio."" \l-o pointed up: "In homes 
equipped with television, radio claimed 
.")', more listening lime in 1954 than 
it did the pre\ ions year." I he i i-e in 



out-of-home listening ( particularly in 

auto- i is likew i-e cited. 

The presentation departs from its 
broad educational mission to stress 
attractive spot radio buys on the 14 
stations represented bv (!P>S Radio 
Spot Sale-. Particular stress is placed 
on the fait that you can reach more 
homes per dollar with such buys than 
\oii can in spot tv and print media. 

Free & Peters: This rep firm has 
developed recent l\ a ''general' -pot 
radio presentation based on an earlier 
F&P promotion campaign which cen- 
tered on the use of radio jingles in 
saturation -pot drives. 

Titled " \ Formula lor Selling 
Americans Today," the presentation is 
zeroed-in on "the use of spot radio in 
the light of today's selling principles," 
according to F&P Promotion Manage] 
Frank \\ oodruff. 

Three main points are made: 

I. Spot radio is the best advertising 
medium to "find "em. tell em. and sell 
'em.'" -av- the presentation. Spot 
radio, it continues, "reaches the \mer- 
ican family at the rale of •'!() hours 
weekly, tells them about products with 
a minimum of delaj in preparing copy 
and sells them as proved bv results. 

1. I In use o| a "central musical 

(he using top creative skill and top 

production" is recommended. Such a 
national musical trademark, the pres- 
entation explains, could be varied to 
suit the activit) and type ol radio 
audience found throughout the dav. It 
could also be the focal point ol a drive 
to promote spot radio campaigns to 
dealers and company salesmen, or used 
in direct consumer merchandising. 

3. Spot radios low cost-per-1,000 
i> highlighted in the F&P presentation 
as its clincher. Nighttime station 
break- on the 31 I'M '-represented sta- 
tions "now give an advertiser 100', 
more impressions at less than 27', 
more cosl than last year." -k + * 



-r 



The program that- will 
sell your product to West 
Texas housewives. 

on KRBC-TV 



HOMEMAKERS' 

FIESTA" 

4-4:30 p.m. 

Mon.-Fri. 




Represented notionolly by 
JOHN E. PEARSON TV Inc. 



ABILENE 
TEXAS 



SPONSOR ASKS 

\C.ontimied jrom page 73 i 

on her mind! Fondly, Your ectoplas- 
mic playmate, Marion Kirbv.'" Marion 
Kirbv. it seems, was the chief feminine 
character in a movie appearing at 
Wanna - Downtown Theatre. How- 
ever, il turned out that Marion Kirbv 
was also the name ol a real flesh-and- 
blood woman living in Los Angeles — 
and her phone -tailed ringing madly 
after the distribution of the letter, 
llighlv indignant, she brought suit for 
invasion ol privac) and defamation. 

In this particular case, the parties 
involved in creating the promotion 
might have -aved themselves a lot of 
legal trouble if thev had just picked 
up the local telephone book to see if 
there was a real person bv the name 
thev wen- using in the -omewhat scur- 
rilous letter. 

But il is not alwavs that easy to 
handle the problem of fictitious names 
— which is one reason why radio and 
iv broadcasters so often run into right 
of privaev and defamation suits. Char- 
acter- on air shows must have names; 
how can advertiser- and broadcasters 
go about picking and using fictitious 
names and reduce the risk of being 
sued bv live persons? 

Here are the devices usually used: 

1. Pick the most common name in 
the world, e.g. John Smith. There are 
so many of them l hat you may be safe 
if one sues; you can alwavs point to 
another and sav he is really voin 
character. 

2. Pick the mosi unusual tongue- 
twisting name v oil can dream up — 

Mo\ sius Felix Kensington Robespierre- 
Mills, for instance. This will serve 
nicely, unless a fellow turns up who 
happens to have the same name — in 
which case, you mav reallv be in 

trouble. 

3. Have a person with the name vou 
want to use sign a release giving you 
the right lo use hi- name. This is the 
device used by most segments of the 
advertising, radio and television in- 
dustry, but the protection which it 
gives i-. ai best, illusory. Though such 
a release can sometimes help in a suit 
as proof of lack of malice, it affords 
no real protection against liability, the 
lest of which is: Would a reasonable 

person conclude that the fictional 
< haractei portrayed is the same person 
as the plaintiff? 

I Kim mv investigation of this prob- 



100 



SPONSOR 



36-24-36 

WOW! 




KRON-TV has some impressive statistics too. Look at the way the station 
stacks up — 

• Antenna Height: 1441 feet above sea level, the highest 
in San Francisco 

• Power: 100 KW, the top power authorized for Channel 4 

• Audience: 1,382,000 families in KRON-TV's 23 county 
coverage area. 

It all means this: You can count on KRON-TV to give you the best and most 
complete coverage over the widest area of the Northern California market. 







4 



AFFILIATED WITH THE S. F. CHRONICLE 
AND THE NBC-TV NETWORK ON CHANNEL 



No. 1 in the series, "What Every Time Buyer Should Know About KRON-TV" 

Represented nationally by Free & Peters, Inc. 



24 JANUARY 1955 



101 



lem, here i> the device I recommend: 

Invest your characters with as com- 
plete a personality and environment 
us ii»« can; name [he street he lives 
on. give names and occupations to his 
parents, hi- brothers and sisters, de- 
lineate his background and schooling, 
his particular habits and hobbies. In 
this way vou can always point to dis- 
similarities between your show charac- 
ter and the actual person who believes 
he is being portrayed. For instance, 
if \ mi can -how that vour character- 
father is alive and is in the appliance 
business whereas the plaintiff's father 
i- dead and was an insurance sales- 
man, it is convincing evidence that 
your fictional charactei i- not the same 
pei -on as the plaintiff. 

Naturally, the more complete the 
depicted personalit) and environment 
the better the chances ol showing dis- 
similarities in character: and as these 
di fie rence- increase so do possibilities 
ol successfully defending lawsuits. 

I lie traditional disclaimer about 
"Any resemblance being pureh coin- 
cidental run b\ nearly all air show-, 
i- practically useless in legal suits of 
this nature: in onl) one reported case 
has it done an\ good. 



BMI 



MILESTONES 

BMI's series of program 
continuities, entitled 
"Mile-tones," Ionises the 
Spotlight on important 
events ami problems which 
have shaped the American 
scene. 

"Milestones" for 
February: 

GROUNDHOG DAY— iFeb. 21 

MUSIC LINCOLN LOVED-Abra- 
ham Lincoln's Birthday iFeb. \i> 

THE SPIRIT OF FREEDOM— Free- 
dom Week (Feb. 12-22) 

YORKTOWN MACNIFICENT 

CAMBLE— George Washington s 
Birthday 'Feb. 22) 

IN BROTHERHOOD WE PROCRESS 
— National Brotherhood Week 
(Feb. 21-281 

Mlleitonet" .« available l»r com- 
mercial tpontorthlf — »<•'• youi 
local nation! for delalll 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 




SELECT SHOW WITH CARE 
By Harry R. Olsson Jr. 
Right* Attorney, MiC. \<u > ork 

Compfele insula- 
tion can he guar- 
anteed to spon- 
sors and agencies 
against right of 
p r i \ a c j claims 
and defamation 
suits onlj 1»\ the 
method available 
to escape the oth- 
er ills of this world -departure from 
it. However. I assume we are inter- 
ested primarily in less drastic steps 
even though the) offer less complete 
protection. 

First of all. you can obtain Liability 
insurance i from Seaboard or Lloyd's) 
which provides both legal defense and 
indemnit) against mam claims. . . . 
In the broadcasting industry, it is 
customar) for the supplier of a show 
to insure those who use it against suits 
brought arising out of use of the ma- 
terial, lou should he able to secure 
from anyone who supplies a show to 
you an indemnification provision in 
\ our contract. This provision will not 
serve as a shield against a privacy or 
defamation plaintiff: you will remain 
liable il the bases of liability are pres- 
ent. But il you make sure that your 
indemnitor is ol good honor and will- 
ing to live up to his agreement, it will 
afford some protection. If not, you 
niav be obliged not onl) to defend the 
privacy or defamation suit but also 
to bring -nil againsj the indemnitor. 
I -c (are. I -e <are in the selection 
of the tvpe of show which you sponsor 
oi produce. If vou produce the show, 
make sure the script is carefully read 
before each broadcast by someone who 
is qualified; in fact, have the authors 
obtain qualified guidance as they work 
where the subjeel mailer of the show 
justifies it. Gel sober, responsible 
performers on the show who are not 
likclv to ad lib foolishly . 

Lastly, gel your lawyer in as a pre- 
venlor lather than onlv as a litigator. 
Have a staff lawyer on hand who can 
• heck your operations constantly on 
the spot rather than using someone 
u ho can <j\\ e only offhand adv ice un- 
til you have something important, i.e. 
a pending law-nil. Lei him attend to 
the business ol getting vou the best 

insurance available, proper indenmi- 

i ies, a "<lean scripl while v ou deA ote 
youi energies to the business of mak- 
ing youi produd famous. * * * 



ESQUIRE ON TV 

(( ontinued from page 41 1 

displav. The company would like to 
use other media like radio because of 
the circulation the\ can provide, but 
under its current estimated budget of 
$1,750,000, this could onlv be achieved 
I iv weakening the lv campaign; and 
iv. Knomark has discovered, delivers 
the most powerful ad jolt of all. 

Fortunately for Knomark. alternate- 
week sponsorship has proved a practi- 
i al tv arrangement lor smaller clients 
with limited tv budgets. It alternates 
with Remington Hand, with whom it 
has a one-minute reciprocal agreement 
thai affords each sponsor a form of 
week-to-v\ eek continuity . 

Commercials: Knomark ha- decided 
view- on the advantages of program 
sponsorship over participations and 

spot, i One of iis two chief competi- 
tors, Griffin, is a participating sponsor 
en the Imogene Coca Show, while the 
other. Shinola. u-e- -pot. i Program 
sponsorship allow- lor show-product 
identification and lor integration "I 
i ommercial and program, both of 
which strengthen the impact sought as 
all important b\ the company. 

Integration i- simplv achieved with 
a panel show, particularl) one that 
provides for the frequent introduction 
ol new characters. In one commercial, 
lor example. MA'.. Peter Donald intro- 
duced the ""next masquerader, who 
turned out to he announcer Rex Mar- 
shall dressed up as Air. Ksquire i he's 
(he figure on every can of Esquire 
Hoot Polish). After a little by-play 
between the two. Marshall was able lo 
go into his sales talk easily and com- 
fortably . 

\s mighl be expected, the commer- 
cials themselves are demonstration- 
type, the idea being that nothing is so 
convincing as seeing the shine itself. 
I he copy is simple, direct and re- 
search-tested. Marshall's spiel in the 
bil mentioned above is typical: 

"'\\ hen v ou use an ordinary shoe 
polish, vou re jusl laying a thick coat- 
ing on the -ui face ol the -hoc. Bui 
when vou lanolize your shoe- with Es- 
quire 1'xiol Polish, it- exclusive deep 



$60.00 INVESTMENT 
SOLD $1,500.00 in floor covering 

via ALL-NEGRO 

WSOK 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



102 



SPONSOR 










.-» i«?»- i-r»- y 



/ 


Or^ 




it 


W/fty/' ''"'il-^gi : 


Ji n ' 




\ 


1/ 


J 



With cats who know their 




■n 



it's KTRK-TV, 13 to 1 



Dixieland takes the beat from the leader: Houston, 
with its million people . . . long gone and still going. 

And the hottest spots in Houston are the few left open 
on KTRK-TV. Programming's in the key of ABC, with 
KTRK-TV's local variations. It must be good, because it 
packs 'em in . . . audience and advertisers. 

Get the pitch direct from us or from BLAIR-TV. 

KTRK-TV. CHANNEL 13. THE CHRONICLE STATION, P. 0. BOX 12, HOUSTON 1, TEXAS 



Houston Consolidated Television Co. 
General Mgr.: Willard E. Walbndce. Commercial Mgr. : Bill Bennett. 
National Representatives: BLAIR-TV. 150 E. 43rd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Basic ABC. 





lanolizing action builds in a reserve 
shine. Let me show \ ou what I mean. 
(A film clip then shows the process in 
animation.) Deep lanolizing action 
sends Esquire's fine ingredients deep 
into the leather itself . . . softening . . . 
presenilis . . . and shining so bright 
you can actually see your face in it 
. . . just like a looking glass. So if 
you want \onr shine to he brighter 
. . . and to last longer . . . lanolize 
your shoes with Esquire Boot Polish." 
Skeptics maj question the effective- 
ness of the phrase "lanolizing action," 
but a recent survey showed that 21'. 
of the respondents were able to asso- 
ciate it with Esquire. This was by far 
the highest correlation between ad slo- 
gans and polishes that turned up in 
the study. 

Belie lability: Although demonstra- 
tion is central to the Knomark tv sales 
approach, the truth is that certain parts 
of the story are not demonstrated. For 
example: how the boot polish is ap- 
plied and the shine obtained. The ac- 
tual shine, explains a Knomark spokes- 
man, is directly dependent on how 
briskly you rub the leather with your 
cloth; this releases the oils that pro- 



are we ha|)|)«j 7 

& tear! 



SERVING 300.000 
LATIN-AMERICANS!! 




THE MIGHTY "MIKE OF 

SAN ANTONIO 

250,000 Milliwatts 

Ikiiww 

National Time Sales — New York 

Harlan G. Oalces & Assoc. 
Los Angeles — San Francisco 



vide the gleam. 

No matter how you show it, the ac- 
tual shining of the shoes is work! 
How do you show r a person getting the 
shine without indicating through \ isi- 
ble action that it involves time and 
effort? At present the solution seems 
to be to forget about it. 

Th.' othei demons! rat ion omission is 
directly connected with the question 
of belitn ability. Liquid Scuff Rote, the 
biggest seller in its field, according to 
Knomark. offers no obvious \ isual dif- 
ficulties; reason: a basic part of its 
sales storv is the ease of its applica- 
tion. It is simply daubed on to the 
shoe with a little bottle-contained 
brush. Its covering power is easily 
shown by Rex Marshall through the 
device of a board marked by a grease 
line. This cannot be well covered by 
the "ordinary" polish, but it gives no 
trouble to Scuf Kote. 

However, it has proved impossible 
to prove visually the quality of the 
shine produced by Scuff Kote, for the 
simple reason that it takes time for the 
liquid polish to dry and grow lustrous. 
The obvious attempt was made to show 
Marshall applying the polish at the be- 
ginning, then returning later on in the 
program with the same shoe in the 
glistening state. But an audience ques- 
tionnaire revealed that viewers sus- 
pected the shoes had been switched. 
Knomark concluded that it might as 
well slick to showing the application 
and the end results on two different 
shoes, asking the audience to believe 
the claim about the polish and letting 
it go at that. 

Onlv with Lanol-White does Kno- 
mark solve all demonstration difficul- 
ties. In this case it is merer) neces- 
sary to show a hand daubing a polish- 
laden cloth over the dirty surface of 
s lady's white pump. The covering 
ability of the polish, which is said to 
lead in sales among the whiteners, is 
made graphically clear. The film com- 
mercial on Lanol-White, Incidentally, 
is a model oi simplicity, directness and 
convincing sell. It is shot in closeup, 
with only hand. shoe, cloth and bottle 
of polish ever shown. Visually it is 
complete in itself. 1 1 the sound-1 ra< k 
failed, little commercial effectiveness 
would be lost. 

Believability is something .ill adver- 
tisers are i ei tied w ith, and Kno- 
mark is perennially researching con- 
sume] N actions to its ad claims. Si •- 

limes ibis research turns up surprises. 
\ consumel survey found, foi exam- 



ple, that people accept the idea of the 
"miracle ingredient." Oxilan B, which 
"does it all for you when you apply 
Scuff Kote. This, even though the con- 
sumer has little idea of what this magic 
gimmick is. The important thing, how- 
ever, is that Oxilan B seems to be an 
effective selling notion. 

The dream client: Knomark's un- 
oithodoxv extends to its relations with 
its agency. Emil Mogul. Account man 
Charles "Chuck" Rothschild has han- 
dled the account since 1939, when he 
joined Mogul. Rothschild and Emil 
Mogul are frequent visitors to the 
company's six-story Brooklyn plant- 
and-office, where SPONSOR ran into 
them during a Cooks tour of the belt- 
operated factory. At Knomark they 
deal directly with the two owners, Sam 
and Al Abrams, who are president and 
executive vice president respectively, 
and young Mel Birbaum. trained in 
the Emil Mogul agency for his present 
duties as sales and ad manager. 

The Abrams brothers and Birnbaum 
regard themselves as shoe polish man- 
ufacturers rather than advertisers or 
showmen. So far as they are con- 
cerned, it is up to the agency to do 
the basic ad thinking. Many advertis- 
ers give lip service to this idea, but the 
Knomark high command actually prac- 
tices it. 

The) refuse to preview a commer- 
cial before it is released. They will 
not look at copy or storyboard, will 
neither O.K. nor delete anything, will 
have nothing to do with sets, costumes, 
talent! 

Instead, the first notion they have of 
the commercial they get when they see 
il in their living rooms along with 
family and friends. They try, in other 
words, to get as close an approxima- 
tion of a consumer impact as it is 
possible for a manufacturer to receive 
from his own advertising. 

\\ hat if the living room audition 
fails to please? Says \1 Abrams: "Our 
personal taste does not count. It does 
not matter whether we like the com- 
menial or not. W hat counts is its sales 
power." This ma\ be open to legiti- 

i Please turn to page 107) 



RADIO & TV PERSONNEL 

We screen New York's vast 
source of qualified personnel; 
lake the guesswork out of hir- 
ing for stations anywhere. Tell 
us your needs, we do the rest I 

CAREER BUILDERS Agency 

Mor;orie Willy, Director, Radio-TV Div. 
35 West 53rd St., New York 19 • PL 7-6385 




104 



SPONSOR 



THE CRITIC, 

or gun play in one act 




A genuine 24-karat Texas cowboy went to 
*• a movie. He saw a feature about cow- 
boys — the usual Hollywood version typical 
of the genre. He returned to the box office, 
poked his gun through the cashier's window, 
and demanded his money back. 

"In fact," he added, mulling over the 
atrocity he had just seen, "give me every- 
one's money back." 



You can see what our program director 
is up against. Our audience is mighty choosy. 
It can afford to be. The Amarillo area is 
first in the nation in per family retail sales, 
even without gunplay. 



KGNC-AM&TV 

marillo 




NBC and DuMONT AFFILIATE 



AM: 10,000 watts, 710 kc. TV: Channel 4 . Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 

24 JANUARY 1955 105 



WFMY-TV . . . Now On The Air With FULL 




SELLING POWER 

Power: now six times greater 
Studio Space: now eight times greater 
Tower: now 1,549 feet above sea level 
Population: now 1,961,500 
Families: now 501,100 
Market: now $2,305,273,000 
Retail Sales: now $1,560,824,000 
Set Count: now over 300,000 
Experience: now in our sixth year 
All this — and color, too! 

Call or write your H-R-P man today for the 
amazing story of this greatly expanded market. 



* On maximum power, effective January 2, 1955, as 
authorized by FCC on Channel 2. Statistics above based 
on Sales Management Survey of Buying Power — 1954. 



uifmu-tv 



< . 






w 



Basic Affiliate 



GREENSBORO. N. C. 

Represented by 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 

New Yorlt — Chicago — San Francisco 



i f .jew. .J ; i y , 



106 



SPONSOR 



mate question, but if the agency argues 
strongly in its favor the Abrams will 

allow it to continue even if it dis- 
pleases them. 

How does such an arrangement work 
out? Here are the advantages cited b\ 
account man Rothschild: 

1. Because the creative people do 
not have to concern themselves with 
the limiting factors of client taste and 
imagination, better and more imagina- 
tive creative thinking goes into the job 
— the agency concentrates on trying to 
produce effective advertising rather 
than on trying to please the client. 

2. Because the client does not have 
to O.K. everj step, desirable or neces- 
sar\ changes can be made at am stage 
\\ ithout hitches. 

But it is not all sunshine, for agency 
responsibility becomes greater than is 
usual — there is no one to blame but 
yourself is anything goes wrong. 

Rothschild sums it up: '"Such an 
agency-client relationship stimulates 
the agency to function at its creative 
best and at its most efficient form.'" 

Knomark air history: Even in it^ 
basic concept of and experience with 
advertising the shoe polish firm differs 
from the customary. Traditionally ad- 
vertisers have gone from newspapers 
and magazines into radio and telc\ i- 
sion. following the pattern of histori- 
cal development of the various media; 
even today at some agencies policy is 
largely determined by print-oriented 
minds. But in the case of the Esquire 
brand, print is a latecomer and has 
always played a secondary role. 

Advertising means broadcasting to 
Knomark. The fact is that consider- 
ably more than half of this year's ad 
budget would probably be in tv, were 
it not for a feeling that it may not be 
wise to depend completely on any one 
medium. 

This identification of advertising 
with broadcasting steins from 10 years 
of rich experience in both radio and 
tv. The very first advertising cam- 
paign launched by Knomark for Es- 
quire was in broadcasting. This was 
in 1945. on a test campaign that ran 
three months, consisting of an Ed 
Herlihy newscast on WEAF (now 
WRCA). 

Today, with shoe polish sold on big 
network tv shows — in addition to Kno- 
mark's Masquerade Party there is Grif- 
fin's Imogene Coca Show (formerly it 
was a sponsor of Your Show of 
Shows I — the significance of that first 



ladio venture is not readih apparent. 

Up to that time, the compan) says, 
shoe polish was strictl) a 10c business, 
although kiwi'~ 20c poli-h had been 
013 the market long belore I squire ap- 
peared in I 1 ).; 1 ), knomark had been 
manufacturing polish under its corn- 
pain name >ince the late Twenties, but 
its real growth began when, at the 
wars close, it began to push the Es- 
quire line. During the war, a basic 
distribution had been built in the shoe 
tiade through the \lnam~" personal 
Friendships, but in order to realK get 
under way this had to be enlarged bj 
taking in other types of retail outlets; 
and consumer demand had to he cre- 
ated. 

This was the task allotted to broad- 
casting. The first New : York campaign 
got the shoe-repair trade distribution, 
created a mild consumer demand and 
revitalized the sales force. From this 
success the company went on to a 
heavy spot program of radio promo- 
tion in city alter < it\. and sta\ed with 
the medium until tv came along with 
its visual advantages. 

The ke\ element in both radio and 
t\. so far as Knomark is concerned. 
the thing that made it possible for the 
company to put across the 25c quality 
product in a pedestrian, behind-the- 
times trade, was and is their merchan- 
dising potential. 

The whole problem, ad manager 
Birnbaum points out, revolves about 
the low esteem in which shoe polish 
is held. You cannot reasonably expect 
other people to get excited over shoe 
polish just because you manufacture 
it, for in the common view 7 , "It's just 
shoe polish." Birnbaum ruefully re- 
flects that his "grandmother went to 
her grave disappointed that her pre- 
cious grandson had become just a ped- 
dler of shoe polish to bootblacks.'' 

Radio provided the first set of an- 
swers; it made possible heavy mer- 
chandising to the trade. Tv offered 
similar opportunities plus the excite- 
ment of being part of a growing new- 
medium. When Knomark went on 
tv with its first show. Blind Date, in 
the fall of 1950. an elaborate merchan- 
dising piece told the trade the program 
was "reaching over 15,500,000 people" 
every week "with the most forceful 
sales producing impact ever devised to 
bring business to your industry." 

The merchandising pieces have tend- 
ed to grow more elaborate with the 
years, announcing such shows as Hold 
That Camera Ian earlv fiasco that 



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TURN A 
"HOT" 



INTO 

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BUY CESAR ROMERO... 

always a big name — now even bigger! 
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a high-tension series of world-wide 
adventure . 

TO SELL YOUR PRODUCT 

to his vast ready-made audience! Other 
top advertisers are selling their products 
with this show. Why don't you? 

CESAR ROMERO, starring in... 




ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y. 

CHICAGO • ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD ■ DALLAS 



24 JANUARY 1955 



107 



ALL DAY SATURDAY . . . ALL DAY SUNDAY 

DETROITERS HUM ALONG WITH UJUHvl AND 




MUSIC wetthe WEEKEND! 



"Music Over the Week End" is a WWJ spot saturation plan for advertisers who want quick results 
in the fabulous Detroit market . . . where factory workers paychecks are averaging $95 weekly! 
Spot your one-minute sales message in these seven Saturday and Sunday MUSIC shows, featuring 
Detroit's top radio personalities. 




SATURDAY NIGHT is COUNTRY MUSIC NIGHT! 
8:00-9:30 Art Lazarow 9:30-10:00 "Grand Ole Opry" 
10:00-12:00 "WWJ Square Dance 



j > 



See Your Hollingbery Man 

for full details of WWJ's 

"Music Over the Week End" 

Spot Saturation Plan . . . 



UIUU 



AM 
FM 



Auociafe Television Station WVVJ-TV 

Basic NBC Affiliafe 



AM-950 KILOCYCLES-5000 WATTS 
FM-CHANNEL 2«-97.1 MEGACYCLES 



WORLDS FIRST RADIO STATION • Ownerf and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS • National Repteienlalivei: THE GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 



108 



SPONSOR 



taught Knomark it knew more about 
polish than show business I; Kate 
Smith on NBC TV (daytime); 1951- 
'52; The Arthur Godfrey Shoiv on 
CBS Radio and TV, 1953; and the 
NBC Radio Operation Tandem in 
1952. 

With the ad approach has gone a 
concern with dealer incentives. Kno- 
mark has kept the profit margin hiiili 
to make it worthwhile for the retailer 
to push the product, and is a strong 
advocate of fair trade. It is this com- 
bination of effort on the dealer level 
along with its extensive promotion to 
the public that has brought the com- 
panj to its present position. 

Competition has not >|ood still, (iiil- 
fin and Shinola are going strong, hav- 
ing themselves introduced 25c lines in 
recent \ears. I nit-wise. Shinola prob- 
abl) outsells the rest because of it- 
popular lower-priced lines. But Kno- 
mark is content to regard its 25', 
share of the industry volume as about 
all it can handle at the present time. 
Production is at an all-time high. But 
Knomark is obviously gearing itself 
for future expansion, for the present 
plant's capacity has been exceeded by 
demand — and a new, larger plant is 
under construction now. * * * 



NETWORK RADIO 

[Continued from page 45) 

new programing concepts in mid- 
March. 

Here are the PIB figures for billings 
of the four radio networks during 11 
months of 1953 and 1954: 



1953 
ABC $26,971,954 

CBS $56,826,894 

MBS $21,030,808 

NBC $41,520,106 

TOTAL $146,349,762 



1954 Decrease 

$26,688,385 1.1% 

$49,971,925 12.1% 

$18,682,726 11.2% 

$31,036,583 25.2% 
$126,379,619 



It is unlikely that radical policy- 
changes will go into effect in 1955 de- 
spite decreases. Among those new con- 
cepts of network radio that have been 
discussed by men in the industry dur- 
ing the past year are the following: (1) 
possibility of taped networks; (2) pos- 
sibility of net radio becoming a pro- 
gram service on the order of the Asso- 
ciated Press; (3) possibility of pro- 
graming net radio with tv soundtracks 
and simulcasts. 

Here's what top executives at the 
four major radio networks say about 
these three possibilities: 

Taped programing — Very unlikely, 



-a\ the network officials. There's lit- 
tle possibility "I compensating for cur- 
rent network radio revenue through 
sale of taped programing to stations 
only. For one thing, there- a public 
service need for nationwide radio cm- 
erage for such things as a Presidential 
message. "i et. on a one-shol basis, one 
hour of national co\era^e would cost 
as much as a full day does today. 

A top network official explained the 
economies of the situation this way: 
The cable cost for all four networks 
under the present set-up is about $6 
million a year. Assuming then that it 
is $1.5 million per network for the lines 
and assuming that Network A has 220 
affiliates, this would mean a cable cost 
of some $7,000 per year per station. It 
would be impossible to provide com- 
parable taped programing for that 
amount of money. 

But, the advertiser would lose some- 
thing beyond the quality and variety 
of programing: He'd lose spontaneity. 
If an advertiser today buys network 
radio, he does so because he wants 
simultaneous broadcasting over a vast 
coverage area. He can change his com- 
mercial copy five minutes before going 
on the air. In the case of taped pro- 
graming replacing live nets, this would 
not be true. 

Associated Press approach — Not eco- 
nomical, say the networks. Here's how 
the "AP" system would work : The net- 
work would again be a programing 
service, but it would sell this program- 
ing to the stations rather than to ad- 
vertisers. The programing would be 
live, transmitted over the telephone 
cables. 

Network officials agree that this sys- 
tem does not hold the solution to net- 
work radio's problems. Local stations 
couldn't pay enough for this service to 
make up for the loss of advertiser 
revenue. Therefore, with cost of tele- 
phone lines continuing to be high, and 
cost of production maintaining, the 
level of programing would decline 
sharph . 

Tv soundtracks or simulcasts — Of 
course, say the networks. There are a 
lot of simulcasts even now. Also, there 
are some musical tv shows which ad- 
vertisers sponsor on radio without hav- 
ing much added radio production costs. 
But, \ou can't rely on tv alone for ra- 
dio programing. In the first place, not 
every tv show is adaptable to radio 
without rewrites and production 
changes. Take a show like / Love Lucy r 
and the number of visual gags it de- 



BIG-TIME 



SNAPPED UP 
THIS SHOW 



WHY? 



Powerful format— swiftly paced adven- 
tures of a daring diplomatic courier in 
the hot spots of the world. 

Great star appeal— CESAR ROMERO 
delivers a ready-made audience of 
millions, even before the first telecast. 
Terrific promotion "plus" — big 

opportunity to build an entire promotion 
around a big-name, big-time, big 
box-office attraction. Romero's avail- 
able for commercials, too. 

Such brewers as Blatz, Griesedieck and 
Pearl, just to name a few, have already 
hitched their sales story to Romero and 
"Passport to Danger." How about you? 

CESAR ROMERO, starring in . . . 




TO 
DANGER 




CHICAGO 



ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y 

ATLANTA ■ HOLLYWOOD • DALLAS 



24 JANUARY 1955 



109 



"IT'S AS 

BASIC 
AS YOUR 
RATE CARD" 



1955 Buyers' Guide to Station Programing 

ADVERTISING FORMS CLOSE FEBRUARY 15 



110 SPONSOR 



pends upon. The soundtrack, alone 
wouldn't provide first-rate radio enter- 
tainment. 

But beyond that, eliminating the ob- 
vious production costs wouldn't neces- 
sarily spell out economy for the net- 
works. There'd be the union problem 
to contend with. Musicians, as an ex- 
ample. You might want to use a large 
band on t\ partl\ because of the visual 
effect, but on radio the sound of a 
large band could be faked at a con- 
siderable saving. 11 use of tv sound- 
tracks became the rule on radio net- 
works, unions would be unlikely to by- 
pass reuse payments. 

It seems unlikely then, that drastic 
polic\ or structure changes will alter 
net radio within a year. Top network 
radio executives forecast realistically 
that they expect no rise in network ra- 
dio revenue for the year, despite 
changes in programing concepts. At 
the same time, they feel that billings 
reached a levelling-off point in 1954, 
and the\ expect 1955 to be a profitable 
year for network radio. * * * 



CUT-INS 

(Continued from page 45) 

There's no standardization whatsoever. 
The only approximation of standard 
rates is the $55 rate set by NBC's o&o 
stations. ABC and Du Mont clear cut- 
ins for a client, but don't set the rates, 
though lO^S of the hourly nightttime 
rate is fairly standard. CBS doesn't 
handle this extra service at all, thus 
eliminating the service charge incurred 
through extra bookkeeping that would 
be needed at the network. 

Costs notwithstanding, more adver- 
tisers than ever used network tv cut-ins 
in 1954. As an industry, the tobacco 
companies were the newest and most 
extensive users of the device. They 
used cut-ins to introduce the king-size 
and filter-tip brands that crowded the 
standard cigarettes on cigar counters 
in the past year. 

New cigarettes, like most new prod- 
ucts, are introduced on a market-In - 
market basis, until they gradually 
achieve national distribution. In the 
ultra-competitive post-cancer scare at- 
mosphere tobacco companies were anx- 
ious to put a particularly big advertis- 
ing push behind their new entries. 
Prime spot tv time is tough to clear. 
Furthermore, the tobacco companies 
already sponsor 20 network tv shows 
every week. Local cut-ins. while ex- 



pensive, provided the new brands iden- 
tification with existing network prop- 

cities. On NBC alone. R. J. Reynolds. 
\merican Tobacco and P. Lorillard 
used network t\ cut-ins on their shows 
to push their new brands. 

Eventually, as the new cigarettes 
achieved more than spott\ distribution, 
the tobacco companies were able to use 
regional cut-ins, which are generalb 
compartiveK cheaper than clearing lo- 
cal cut-ins over scattered stations. Re- 
gional cut-ins are always arranged 
through the network, and the rate 
charged is the cost of the film studio 
or announcer at the station of origina- 
tion, plus an extra charge for the addi- 
tional feed lines. 

Another use of local cut-ins in recent 
times is illustrated by Buick on The 
Milton Berle Show I through kudneri. 
The cost of the car differs in different 
localities. Therefore, the agency sched- 
uled 11-second cut-ins with slides show- 
ing the local price on more than 100 
stations. In the same way, an adver- 
tiser can localize the appeal of his par- 
ticular product in different parts of the 
country b\ using cut-ins. 

The third reason for using cut-ins is 
to give local dealer tags. Roto-Broil 
I through Products Services) did just 
that with its sponsorship of the Elec- 
tion Night returns over CBS and NBC, 
though probably on a grander scale 
than generally attempted by one-shot 
advertisers. Roto-Broil used local cut- 
ins of 11 to 20 seconds on some 160 
stations. 

Here's how it worked : 

Dealers had been notified that Roto- 
Broil was planning to sponsor the Elec- 
tion Night returns. They were in- 
formed that they could get a dealer 
mention provided they placed a speci- 
fied order. These cut-ins were slides 
with the names and addresses of the 
local dealers in a particular market, 
while the regular network announcer 
was heard voice-over, urging viewers 
to go to their local retailer. 

In some instances, Roto-Broil got 
package deals because it used more 
than one cut-in per station. In Dallas, 
for example, Roto-Broil had six cut- 
ins — three on CBS and three on NBC. 
Some stations gave package rates of 
approximately 5% of a network hour. 
Other stations charged virtually their 
regular spot rate. One particular sta- 
tion charged $600 for the cut-in. To- 
tal cost of the cut-ins alone on that 
evening was between $10,000 and 
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111 



Despite the -tiff charge, Roto-Broil 
was pleased with the results. Initial 
dealer orders were substantial, and the 
dealers were delighted with the slide 
mention. Roto-Bmil was able to open 
up a lot of new accounts as a result of 
the promotion. \l-o. sales of the rotis- 
serie were sparked considerable 

Network t\ cut-ins are. of course, a 
carry-over from network radio. Such 
advertisers as P&G, Bristol-Myers, Gen- 
eral Mills, Philco, General Foods — to 
mention just a few — had long been 
using network radio cut-ins to adver- 
tise different brands in various regions 
or to insert local messages. In radio, 
a- in t\. some networks are more re- 
ceptive to cut-ins than others. ABC 
and MBS haw always been generally 
more willing to make network radio 
cut-in deals than CBS ami NBC. By 
the same token. VBC and Du Mont 
were more likelj to permit their use in 
tv some two or three years ago. To- 
day, however, the pressure of major 
network tv clients requiring local and 
regional cut-in- is such, that MIC has 
joined the ranks of networks making 
i ut-ins easier for advertisers. CBS still 
leaves clearance of cut-ins up to the 
individual client. * * * 



ADDED STATIONS 

I Continued from page 45 I 
all) because of fringe coverage from 
other cities. Still others — like Da\ton 
— have only one or two stations on the 
air because one or more uhf operators 
have returned their CP's or have sus- 
pended service and no new applications 
have been made. 

4. Competition for new channels, 
parti< ularlv vhf. is often fast and furi- 
ous. As a station relations executive of 
CBS I \ said: "Applicants may call a 
truce, hand together and put a station 
on the air pending final FCC decision. 
This has already happened with KSL \. 
in Shreveport. But in the biggest mar- 
kets where vhf channels are still in 
contest, most applicants aren't likely 
to give an inch and the process may 
drag on for months/' 

Here are detailed highlights of the 
situation according to SM market size: 

Boston: The Hub Citv now has two 
vhf and one uhf channels operating; 
it's the biggest of the cities where sta- 
tion clearance in tv is still a major 
headache, \nother uhf-er, Channel 44, 
has been granted. There is one more 
vhf channel assigned to the area — but 
five major applicants, from DuMont to 



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the Boston Post, are battling for it. 
Outlook for 1955: No change foreseen 
before fall in vhf. WJDW, which has 
had a uhf 44 C.P. for more than a year, 
may put its tv station on the air in 
1955. 

Pittsburgh: This city is the biggest 
two-station market on the U.S. map; it 
has one vhf (WDTV, now Westing- 
house-owned I and one uhf I WENS) 
actively on the air. One uhf channel, 
53, suspended after substantial losses. 
A vhf channel, 11, is hotly contested 
hv two applicants. CBS TV, however, 
is currently seeking FCC approval for 
a deal which may add another vhf-er 
to the area. CBS's plan: To purchase 
Steubenville's WSTV, Channel 9 and 
move the transmitter to Florence, Pa. — 
just three-and-a-half miles from down- 
town Pittsburgh. The Columbia tv web 
may need the outlet, too; WDTV is 
going to be a basic NBC TV outlet, and 
some CBS TV shows may lose their 
prized slots. Outlook for 1955: It's 
all up to the FCC. 

New Orleans: Two stations are on 
the air in this citv: one (WDSU-TV) 
is a firmly established vhf, the other is 
a recent uhf. Grants for three more 
uhf stations have been issued, although 
one (WTLO, Channel 20) was recently 
returned. Three local radio stations — 
\\ \\ L, WNOE, and WTPS— are com- 
peting for the sole remaining vhf chan- 
nel, 4, not yet assigned. Outlook for 
1955: You probably won't see another 
vhf outlet in the market this year. One 
or more uhf-ers, however, may go on. 

Providence: Currently, this New 
England market is a two-station citv. 
with one uhf and one vhf channel ac- 
tive. A union of three applicants, 
(Please turn to j>age 116) 




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112 



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however, will bring a new vhf station, 
WPRO-TV, Channel 12, on the air "in 
'.>() days."" according to the John Blair 
rep firm. Protest to the FCC had pre- 
viously blocked the CP. 

Miami: Two stations are on the air 
in this resort city, but four more are 
in the works. The FCC has already 
granted CP"s for two uhf-ers. Channels 
27 and 33 to WMIE-TV and WMFL. 
Either ma) go on within six months, 
according to network sources. Two 
more channels, vhf 7 and 10, are each 
being sought b\ four big applicants. 
Incidentally, Niles Trammell. ex-NBC 
chairman, is president of one of the 
firms seeking Channel 7. Outlook for 
1955: Strong possibility of one more 
uhf-ei : sonic chance for another vhf 
station. 

Tampa: One uhf channel, 38, is cur- 
rently active in the Tampa-St. Peters- 
burg area. However, CP's have been 
granted to two applicants for vhf chan- 

*••••••• 

• •In the atomic and electronic age in 
which we now live, changes are transpir- 
ing al such a rapid rate, that it takes 
more than our past experience to adjust 
to them, and to appreciate and fully 
comprehend them. But alter all is said 
and done, the efforts in which we are 
engaged are stimulating because they 
are for the purpose of entertaining and 
informing and educating people and 
not for destroying them. They are in- 
lentled lo serve the constructive pur- 
poses of advancing civilization, increas- 
ing happiness and making life more 
meaningful." 

BRIG. GEN. DAVID SARINOFF 

Chairman of the Board 

RCA and 1\RC. /Veto York 

• ••••••• 

nels 8 and 13. The first of these, 
WFLA-TV, expects to be on the air 
early in February, according to its 
rep, John Blair. The other. WTVT. has 
set March as its target date, according 
to Wery-Knodel. Outlook for 1955: 
Tampa will go from a one-station to a 
three-station < itv . 

Toledo: Another market currentlj in 
the one-station category, Toledo may 
also jump to three stations this year. 
A CP has been granted for uhf chan- 
nel 7 ( >. and the owners hope to get on 
the air b\ mid-1955. The remaining 
channel foi the area. \bf channel 11. 
is being contested bj no less than 
seven applicants. However, the appli- 
cant- are currentlj trying to agree on 
an "interim"" deal wherein each firm 
puts up $100,000 to put a station on 
the air. with the ultimate winner of the 
FCC's nod to pay back the others. 
Outlook lor 1055: \t [easl one. and 
possibl) two more stations. * * * 



TALENT COSTS 

{Continued from page 37 i 

rights for writers on the show. 

'"No matter what you say about the 
agents wanting to pick the best non- 
performing talent for a show," said an 
agency man. "there's no denying that 
anj agent has a natural bias in favor 
of bis clients and when this agent is a 
power in the business, this natural bias 
means something." 

In some agency circles, there is an 
inclination to pooh-pooh the idea that 
an agent with a large list of clients can 
do anv better than an agent with only 
a few. 

"It's the star who counts." said one 
adman, "not the agent. If a star is 
worth money to a client, the star will 
get just what he's worth and it doesn't 
make an\ difference who the agent is. 
If you want to start putting the blame 
on somebod) for high costs, how about 
blaming the sponsors who are shelling 
out all this dough?" 

2. The fierce battle for supremacy 
between CBS and NBC is playing di- 
rectly into the hands of WM and MCA, 
a number of agency men fear. I his 
gives the agents, these admen say, an 
opportunity to play one network 
against another and bid up talent 
prices. They cite the recent case of 
CBS' Ed Sullivan, an MCA client, as 
an example. 

As one well-informed programing 
executive tells the Sullivan storj : 
Sonny Werblin, MCA vice president 
and its top t\ talent negotiator asked 
NBC if it was interested in Lincoln- 
Mercurvs top salesman, whose CBS 
contract expires next fall. NBC was, 
offered Sullivan around $8,000 a 
week, substantially above what he was 
getting, and a long-term contract. CBS 
has first refusal rights for Sullivan, 
meaning it has to be given the chance 
to meet anv offer. 

Sullivan's Toast of the Ton n is the 
anchor show on CBS' Sunday night 
lineup. (IBS' entire Sunday evening 
schedule would be in jeopardy were 
Sullivan to join NBC. I nwilling to 
live without Sullivan, CBS met the 
NBC offer (and some sa\ it bettered it 
a little). In the final settlement. Sulli- 
van got $8,200 a week and a 20-year 
contract, which includes being paid 
for just promising to work for no 
othei network. 

The Sullivan case was nol the only 
recenl example < ited. The details are 
not important. What is important is 



116 



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admen feel that part of the cost of the 
talent the) pa) for represents nothing 
more or less than insurance against 
inter-network raiding — or agent-in- 
duced inter-network raiding rather 
than payment for audiences delivered. 
More on t li i> later. 

3. The spectaculars, saj the ad 
agencies, have had a hig impact on 
talent <<p~l-. \s one agenc) man put it: 
"As soon as NBC announced it was 
going to put on spectaculars, talent 
prices suddenlv jumped.'" The so- 
called baby spectaculars on CBS, 
Shower <>l Stars and Best <>j Broad- 
urn. made the situation worse, he said. 

\\ hili- not denying the positive ex- 
citement values of the spectaculars, ad- 
men point out that, on the other side 
of the coin, their nature made it neces- 
sar) for the networks to bring in names 
of marquee standing — which means 
mone) stars. For NBC the stakes were 
high. The network was not onl\ cast 
in the role of stimulating interest in 
coloi sets for its parent company, RCA, 
luil was determined. h\ means of the 
spectaculars, to ride roughshod over 
CBS competition. ()nl\ 1>\ accomplish- 
ing this latter job, sax admen, could 
the high-priced spectaculars pan out 
as a worthwhile buy for advertisers. 
Those who saw NBC's sales presenta- 
tion for tin- spectaculars recall that 
riding roughshod over the competition 
was just what NBC promised. 

The significance of this, admen now 
sa\ ruefully, was not lust on WM and 
MCA. the two agents who could deliver 
more name talent than all the other 
agents combined. The result was that 
the network- were asking \Y\I and 
MCA how much such and such talent 





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would cost rather ihan telling them 
that the) could afford only such and 
such an amount of dollars. \\ M. which 
represents Max Liebman and books 
the two Liebman spectaculars, is obvi- 
ouslv in a strategic position here. 

There was another aspect of the spec- 
taculars that affected the talent market. 
This was their periodic nature, which 
meant that a new pool of talent was 
available, namely, the film stars who 
were interested in tv — or just plain 
money — but who feared that every- 
week programing would destroy them. 

So, because of the periodic nature 
of the spectaculars (as well as the tax 
laws I the price- asked for talent by 
WM and MCA tended to be high. But 
a number of agencies wish that WM 

******** 

"Countless millions of dollars are be- 
ing spenl for scientific research used 
in developing new products. That's 
smart. In comparison, only pennies 
are being spent for sound advertising 
and marketing research to help sell 
these products more economically, and 
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eix;ar kobak 

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******** 

and MCA could have shown more 
restraint. 

The entrance of additional film stars 
into tv is not unwelcome by the net- 
works. But some of the program men 
are riled at having to pa\ high prices 
for talent who, they say, consider their 
Hollywood careers uppermost, look at 
tv as a stepchild and use it as a second- 
ary souce of income. 

4. One of the biggest problems with 
high tv talent costs, the agencies >a\. 
is the wa\ in which the) snowball. A 
big factor here is prestige. If one star 
gets a certain figure, another one will 
leel he must get the same lor more) 
to keep his Standing in the entertain- 
ment industry. 

Here's one agenc) executive's com- 
ment on how NBC and talent have 
been "educated ' b) tv's cosl I rends: 

"< Ince NBC j ielded to a price ol 
$50,000, a> it ilid in the case of Ginger 
Rogei - w Inn she appeared on a spec- 
tacular, ii can'l expeel agents to ask 
for $40,000 when it inquires about a 
name ol similar or bigger magnitude. 

"\ot l< .iilj ago one ol i\ - top corn- 
ed* stars was asked how much he 



wanted to do a spectacular. The price 
he came up with was $250,000. The 
NBC inquirer expressed himself as 
aghast and asked the star how he 
arrived at that figure. 

"'Well.' the star retorted, 'you paid 
Cinger Rogers §50.000 and I consider 
myself as certainly worth five times 
that." "• 

I he influence of the prestige factor 
spreads out like ripples from a stone 
thrown in the water. One adman cited 
the case of Gloria Swanson, who asked 
for S75.000 to do "Sunset Boulevard" 
on Lux J ideo Theatre, a price con- 
sidered way out of line and. in this 
case, a price that was not paid. In 
defense of the talent agents, another 
adman said thai thev were the victims 
as well as the victimizers in this num- 
bers game involving prestige. And, it 
is said, the Las Vegas talent price level 
has had a minor but perceptible influ- 
ence on video. 

It is not only the high-priced shows 
that are affected. The big talent cost 
numbers trickle all the way down the 
line and have a varied impact on less 
expensive shows and talent. 

Some agencies are griping about 
the long-term contracts which pay tal- 
ent for tying itself exclusively to one 
network. In the Jackie Gleason deal. 
for example, the star will get SI. 5 mil- 
lion over a period of 15 \ears. or 
roughly. $2,000 a week, from CBS 
whether he works or not. 

One agenc) man summed up the 
problem as follows: 

More and more stars (and their 
agents) will be asking for this kind of 
deal. The mone) paid out will pyramid 
and become, in effect, a cost of doing 
business, so far as network accounting 
is concerned. The result is that this 
cosl will, in the long run. be borne b) 
all network advertisers, and not onlv 
the sponsors who bin the particular 
star. 

.». Sonic of those close to the talent 
situation sa\ that the income tax laws 
have had more of an effect on l\ costs 
than most admen realize. It is pointed 
out that tax brackets rise to 01', 
and thai aftei a star's taxable income 
reaches $200,000, nine out of ever) I" 
dollars he earns goes to I nele Sam. 
For a -tar who already has a substan- 
tial income, additional appearances on 
i\ ine\ itabl) call for a lot of cash to 
make his after-tax income a tangible 
i it ii i n. 

The big trend is toward sett in<2 up 



118 



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24 JANUARY 1955 119 



stars in business. While the tax situ- 
ation is a complicated one, what it 
comes down to is that once a star in- 
corporates his personality in some 
form he has additional opportunities 
to turn his skill into money. He can. 
for example, put himself on film and 
get additional revenue from reruns. 
He can set up capital gains situations 
and be taxed at the lower capital gains 
rate. Star after star has -et up <>r been 
set up in a film producing outfit for his 
t\ -how. 

One result of all this has been the 
influx of additional advisors to the 
star's retinue. Business, or personal, 
managers are much more numerous 
than before television. There are also 
lawyers and accountants to add their 
advice. 

Since the star is no expert in the 
abstruse tax held, there is a tendency 
for him to lean more on his advisors. 
Both \\ \1 and \IC \ (and their law- 
yer executives, Nat Lefkowitz and 
Maurice Schreier, respectively) are 
past masters in the field of advising 



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He said. "The agent, the business man- 
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tions of their findings. Audience mea- 
surement i- a vastly complicated sub- 
ject and cannot be fully grasped with- 
out long and careful study.'' 

HUGH M. BEVILLE, JK. 

Director Research &■ Planning 

IS liC. New York 



between the live and film unions. 
Hence, llie\ were instrumental in set- 
ting up talent as t\ film producers. 

"\\ hit started off as a favorable tax 
position for the talent and a workable 
convenience for the networks sudden- 
ly turned into a loss of control for 
the lallei . The stai w ho had been put 
into the film business can now -a\ : "I 
own this show and il you want a new 
deal, you'll have to talk to mj agent." 
Vnd this is either W \1 or MCA." 

Another l>il o| iron) about this fili- 
ation involves not onlj the networks 
bul the network sponsors. I he increas- 
ing amount of film shown on networks 
has meant a corresponding decrease 
in use of live facilities. \n agenc) 
radio-h chiel expressed some fears 
about tbi- development: 

assume that the networks are 



still amortizing their equipment. Well, 
if they are, that means each live show- 
is bearing more of a production cost 
burden. That may explain win our 
production costs have gone up 70' , 
over last year. And now I see CBS has 
joined NBC in saddling us with that 
$500 film origination charge. That's 
outrageous! Gas stations give free air. 
hotels give free water. \\ by should 
networks charge us for running a 
film?" 

With some of the long-term effects 
of the economics of the talent market 
alreadv beginning to appear, the ques- 
tion naturally arises whether anything 
can or should be done about the tv 
cosl situation. This question will be 
discussed in the next issue, along with 
a further look into the operation- of 
WM and MCA. an analysis of the cost- 
per- 1.000 figures for name shows and 
rebuttal from those who feel talent 
agent- have nol acted unreasonably in 
raising costs. * * * 



ROUND-UP 

I Continued from page 7(> i 

In 1929 Richard II. Mason went.to 
work at WPTF. Raleigh. \. C, as a 
part-time announcer and singer. This 
month he celebrated his 25th anniver- 
sary with the station — of which he 
now i- president. To mark the event, 
S. B. Coley, chairman of the board of 
\\ P IT Radio Co.. gave Mason a silver 
bowl and 25-year certificate. In recall- 
ing Mason"- career at WPTF. Colej 
said the present station president, after 
part-time annoum ing-singing chores 
for two \ears. was made program man- 
ager. Three wars later he was pro- 
moted to general manager and in 1944 
was elected to the board of directors. 
He was made a vice president in 1951 
and in December of P).">.'i was elected 

president. I nder Mason's management 
and direction the outlet has grown 
from a one kw part-time station to 50 
ku lull-time NBC affiliate. 

* # # 

The Maryland-D.C. Broadcasters As- 
sociation has formed a Freedom ol In- 
formation committee, reports II- Leslie 
Peard Jr., president. Function of the 
committee is to operate as a "watch 

dog"' to protect access to new- and in- 
formation. Members of the committee 
are torn White. WBAL-AM-TV, .hair- 
man : Theodore I Ted I Koop. CBS. 
Washington; Charles Truitt. WBOC, 



120 



SPONSOR 




Thanks to the thrift of employed Americans and 
the cooperation of 45.000 companies which have 
enrolled more than 8.000.000 men and women in 
the Payroll Savings Flan — 

• Sales of E and H Bonds (H Bond is the current-income 
companion piece of the E Bond, sold only to individuals 
and purchased in larger denominations by executives) in 
1954 totaled $4.9 billion, a new peacetime record. 

• Sales in 1954 exceeded all redemptions in that year of 
matured E Bonds and unmatured E and H Bonds bv more 
than $400 million — the highest net amount since 1949. 



• Cash value of E and H Bonds outstanding reached a new 
record high of $38.2 billion, a gain of $1.5 billion in 1954. 



• This $38.2 billion cash holding b\ individuals represents 
14% of the national debt. Never before has the national 
debt of our country been so widely held. 

These figures, far more effectively than mere words, 
tell the story of The Payroll Savings Plan — why it 
is good for America, why it is good for husiness. If 
you do not have the Plan, or if you have the I Man 
and your employee percentage is less than 50%, 
phone, wire or write to Savings Bond Division, 
U. S. Treasury Department, Washington, D. C. 



The United States Government does not pay for this advertising. The Treasury Department 
thanks, for their patriotic donation, the Advertising Council and 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS, INC 




24 JANUARY 1955 



121 



Salisbury, and Man Long, WFML). 

I rederick. 

* # » 

Al Jarvis, who is m.c. <>f Make Be- 
lieve Ballroom on KIWI!. Hollywood, 
has met an .una^r of 3.000 people 
each Saturda) at his personal ap- 
pearances at Los Angeles super mar- 
Mi-. Mori Sidley, station manager, 
says thai the KFWB merchandising 
program has brought so many new 
people into the markets that the sta- 
tion has a waiting list of more than 
• i0 stores which wish to participate in 
the plan. Only payoff required from 
the market is product display space foi 
KIWI! food ad\ ei li-er-. One market 
wrote the station that "the Saturda) 
Jarvis made his appearance was the 
largesl single da) both in dollar vol- 
ume and customer count in the history 
o| our market." 

* «■ * 

laced with competition from three 
\ hi stations and its inahilit\ to obtain 
network affiliation, W FMZ-TV, Allen- 
lown. I'a.. a uhf station, has adopted a 
polii \ of live local programing. In 
less than two weeks of operation it 
I 1 l brought the volunteer fire depart- 
ment of a neighboring town, with its 
two firetrucks, into W FMZ-TV's large 
studio to demonstrate fire-fighting 
techniques; (2) brought a prize win- 
ning bull into the studio, along with 
the farmer who raised it and the meat 
packer who bought it. and interviewed 
all three principal-: i .'! i again taking 
advantage of the large studio, brought 
in an entire high school basketball 
team to demonstrate \ arious pla\ s. 

* * * 

"Buy-it-at-your-drugstore" will he 

the theme 1. 1 next month's tv commer- 




'Ncx» time I'll let KRIZ Phoenix tell me 
where to go to get gasoline.'' 



cials telecast 1>\ Pharmaceuticals Inc. 
(Serutan, Geritol). On its Douglas 

Edwards & the Seics, Juvenile Jury. 
Life Begins at Eighty and Meet Millie 
network t\ pro-rams. Pharmaceuticals' 
commercials will stress that the drug- 
gist, together with the physician, helps 
protect the family's health. "Your 
druggist i> ready to help you in ever) 
need or emergency."' the commercials 
will say. "Help him to help you In 
patronizing him."' Radio, newspaper 
and magazine advertising also will be 
used in the month-long campaign. 
* * * 

Claude Frazier (left), manager of 
W \(.\. Atlanta, is shown in the pic- 
ture handing over the keys to a lT>r> 
Plymouth Belvedere sports auto to Lew 
l!e\ nolds of the W \( ', \ -ales staff. 



i jt: 




l!e\ nold- won the car in a -ale- contest 
conducted among WAG A salesmen. He 
brought in the greatest increase in ac- 
counts and dollar volume, both in 
numbers and percentage-wise, to win 
the car. 

-::• * * 

I he next million-watt uhf tv station 
ma) be KI'TV. Portland. The outlet 
reports that it has received its trans- 
mitting equipment and lacks onl) a 
filterplexer and two racks. It aims for 
a 1 March power-boost dale. 
* * * 

Poll\ lladdad. publicity manager of 
WORK. Roston. sa\s: "What better 
medium than radio to get all churches 
to keep their doors open at all lime-, 
and to get all people to take advantage 
ol these open doors whenever the) feci 
the need for meditation, solace and 
comfort'.'' Answering her own ques- 
tion. Mis- lladdad sa\s her station. 
cooperating with the Open Church As- 
sociation ol Gloucester, is airing a 
dail) L5-minute program phis an- 
nouncements throughout the da) urg- 
ing listeners to \ i-it a church and to 
leave their trouble- there. "The trend 
already shows more and more churches 



leaving their doors open after Sunday 
services are over," she adds. 

* * * 

A colorful 36-page book showing 
the historical development of Grand 
Rapids with old drawings and pic- 
tures has been prepared by WOOD- 
AM-TV. Pictures in the book contrast 
early Grand Rapids with the < it\ as it 
stands today and covers industry, bus- 
iness, schools, churches, transporta- 
tion and other elements of the com- 
munity. In addition the book gives a 
bird's-eye-view of the day-by-day op- 
eration of WOOD-AM-TV. 

* « * 

The continuit) writer- at W TIC. 
Hartford, are getting some unexpected 
competition. Recentb one of the stu- 
dio engineers submitted a script for a 
special program- and it was accepted. 
William Marks, the night supervisor 
of engineers, didn't stop with just 
writing the program, however. He 
went ahead to direct the -how and had 
it taped in advance of its broadcast 

time. 

* « * 

An enormous cardboard mailing 
piece arrived on agencymen's desks re- 
centb from KNX, Los Angeles. A big 
folder, the promotion piece had a 
string tied around it and on the front 
cover showed an elephant wrapped in 
paper, with the headline. "How to 
wrap an elephant.'' Inside, the folder 
said that Los Angeles is like an ele- 
phant and has spread in all directions. 
Today, says the folder, less than 10', 
of all retail sales arc made in the 
downtown business area. To cover the 
whole retail sales area — 50 miles or 
more in diameter — you need K\\. the 
station asserts. 

* * •* 

Never underestimate the power of 
a musical commercial. The Mode 
Day Corp.. Los \ngele-. in a re- 
cent series of promotions for its chain 
of women's store-, used singing jin- 
gles produced b) Song Ads Co. of 
HolKwood. '"We've received I derail) 
dozens of comments from our store 
operators regarding the elTecli\ene— 
o| our jingle- in actuall) bringing 
customers into our -tons." II. II. 
Lindstrom of the women- wear chain 

reported. "Dozens of sales were traced 
directl) to the commercial." \Iosi 
amazing stor) he heard about. Lind 
strom said, concerned a woman in Se- 
attle who was -ick in bed. Rut -hi' 
wrote in to sa\ thai the jingle made 



122 



SPONSOR 




The budget is set . the client 

has okayed the general plan • 
now the pressure is on to draw up 
space schedules; compare stations • 
the hour is late, hut the agency men 
work on • work with Standard Ha 
and if you have a Service-Ad 

near your listing 



you sure 



For the full story on the values 1.101 media get from their Ser\ ice- 
Ads, see Standard Kate's own Service-Ad in the front of an) 
edition of SRDS; or call a Standard Rate Service-Salesman. 
N. Y. C- Murray Hill 9-6620 • CHI.-Hollycourt 5-2400 • L. A.- Dunkirk 2-8576 

ISole: Six years of continuous research among buyers anil users of space 
and time has revealed thai one of the most welcome uses of Service-Ads 
comes at those times account executives or media men are working ni<dil- 
or weekends, planning new campaigns or adjusting current ones. 



•Specialized 
programming 

REACHES, 

SELLS 

losses B\& 
350,000 Negro Martex 




joe Adams 

uals)- 



10,000 WATTS 

Transmitter: Los Angeles, California 
Executive Offices: Santa Monica, California 

National Representatives: 
Forjoe & Co. New York. Chicago, 

Dallas, San Francisco 
Dora Clayton Atlanta, Georgia 

GEORGE A. BARON, Gen'l Mgr. 



i 



FOR HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS 
IN SEW YORE ViTY 

CALL YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL 

REPRESENTATIVE OR 

TELETYPE— N Y 1-3601 



GRAND CENTRAL AREA 




RADIO 



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LEXINCTON AVENUE AT 
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(complimentary to guests). 
Coffee Shop, Restaurant, 
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CITY AREA 



abbey #>otel 



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A 23 Story Modern Hotel. 
Accommodates 1,000 
Cuests. Sensibly Priced. 
Breakfast Room. Stock- 
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Recommended. 




her feel so good that she disobeyed 
her doctor, got up, went to a Mode 
O'Day store and bought herself a dress. 

* * « 

"Tele-Sell Merchandising" is the 
name \\ CCO-TV, Minneapolis, gives 
to its food merchandising plan. The 
station will offer food advertisers the 
choice of three plans (based upon 
week!) expenditures for WCCO-TV ad- 
vertising I . All three plans offer from 
30 to 75 mass displays in about 110 
cooperating super markets; guaranteed 
shelf exposure; shelf talkers and other 
merchandising aids. Don Gillies. 
\\ (CO-TV merchandising director, su- 
pervises the "Tele-Sell" plans. 

* * * 

The advertising industry is getting 
all set to publicize itself during Na- 
tional Advertising Week, 13-19 Febru- 
ary. Major promotion of the week is 
being handled by the Advertising Fed- 
eration of America. J. L. Van Volken- 
burg, president of CBS Television, is 
\d\ertising Week chairman. Other 
members of the committee include 
Roger Pryor, v.p., Foote, Cone & 
Belding; Elon G. Borton, president of 
(he AFA; Tom Ragland Jr., WMBQ, 
Memphis; Richard Geismer, Du Mont 
Television; John Yeck, Yeck & Yeck 
' Dayton agency) ; Dick Messner, Mar- 
bridge Printing Co.; Howard Abra- 
hams, National Retail Dry Goods As- 
sociation, and Jim Proud, assistant to 
the president, AFA. 

* * * 

When the 100,000th baby was born 
in the Columbia Hospital for Women, 
Washington, D. C, WTOP broadcast 
l hr blessed event. To make sure they'd 
be on hand when the 100,000 child 
arrived, WTOP staffers Elinor Lee, 
Patti Searight (program director) and 
James Sillman (WTOP Radio Direc- 
tor) were on "standby" for three 
days. The station forgot to mention, 
in its press release, whether the bal>\ 
turned out to be a boy or girl. 
» * * 

\\ \ \\I (tv), Baltimore, has a new 
trademark. It's a sculptured figure, 
designed for the station b\ Jack Lam- 
bert. The figure i- a powerful kneel- 
ing archer in the acl ol releasing hi 
arrow. \\ \ \\1 says llii- represents 
the station's "top power" and its aim 
at the heart of it- community. The 
figure is being used in station identi- 
fication, promotion announcements 
ami other on-the-air announcements. 



Mai Hansen, farm service director 
for WOW-AM-TV, Omaha, has been 
awarded a Certificate of Commenda- 
tion by the Nebraska County Agents 
Association. The certificate read in 
part: ". . . Presented to Mai Hansen 
for meritorious public service in the 
field of agricultural education. His 
efforts made it possible for thousands 
of people to understand better the ob- 
jectives of the agricultural extension 
service. His work has aided count \ 
agents in carrying their education 
program to people throughout Ne- 
braska . . ." 

* * « 

It was ladies' day all day one recent 
Wednesday at KLAS, Las Vegas, Nev. 
The station's operation for the day 
was turned over to the Las Vegas 
Business & Professional Women's Club. 
Tom Ivory, KLAS manager, said this 
was the third year that the gals have 
taken over the station during National 
Business & Professional Women's 
Week. He says it creates high listen- 
ing interest. 

« * * 

Five radio and television executives 
recently were honored by the Joint 
Defense Appeal "for their contribu- 
tions to the cause of human rights. " 
Network presidents Sylvester L. (Pat) 
Weaver Jr. of NBC TV, Jack L. Van 
Volkenburg of CBS TV, Robert E. 
Kintner of ABC, Thomas F. O'Neil of 
MBS and Ted Bergmann. managing 
director of Du Mont, were honored by 

JDA. 

* * # 

To herald the 1.1 00- foot tower of 
\\S\Z-TY. Huntington, W. Va., the 
Huntington Advertiser ran a front- 
page picture of the structure. The 
photo was one column wide and ran 
from the top to the bottom of the 
page. Cost of the tall tower, accord- 
ing to the paper, was $500,000. The 
station began telecast inn in Novem- 
ber 1 ( )1<) from a ,'UO-foot tower. 

* » » 

Nearly every English-speaking coun- 
try in the world will soon be able to 
bear Conversation. The program, aired 
over NBC Saturday nights, features 
Clifton Fadiman in discussions with 
famous men. I.ouis G. Cowan, who 
( onceived ami now produces t In- -how. 
said the program i- being aired in 
Canada. England, South Africa and 
Australia. * * • 



124 



SPONSOR 



49TH b MADISON 

(Continued from page 18) 

NO DOUBT ABOUT RADIO 

First, let me say the December 13th 
issue of SPONSOR is really "loaded" 
with fine reading. It is one of the best. 
We would also appreciate four cop- 
ies of the September 6th issue contain- 
ing the article "Spot Radio's Creative 
Salesman." 

By the way, for those who have 
their doubts about radio — we are en- 
joying the best December in 25 years 
Pat O'Halloran 
Sales Manager, EPO 
Wenatchee, Wash. 



YEAR-END REPORT 

For years I have avoided subscrib- 
ing to your magazine because "I don't 
have time to read any more" but I 
find after reading your year-end re- 
port in the December 27th issue I can 
no longer ignore you. 

Enclosed is my check for $8.00 for 
a one-year subscription. 

William D. Van Dyke 

Regional Adv. Supv. 

Seaboard Finance Company 

Jacksonville, Fla. 



CORRECT LISTING 

I note that your "New Stations On 
Air" listing gives ERP in kilowatts for 
new stations. Since ours is one of the 
few directional patterns, our RMS 
power around the circle differs from 
our peak power along the coast line. 

... we are rated at 112 kilowatts. 
This is the peak power which we ra- 
diate up and down the coast, where the 
population is located. Toward the 
ocean our power is much reduced in 
order not to waste power on the fish. 
When we filed our application for 112 
kilowatts, they requested that we inte- 
grate the power over 360°. This cal- 
culation came out to 63 kilowatts RMS. 
which is the value you will find in FCC 
releases. 

I wouid appreciate your listing us 
with the 112 kilowatt value. 
J. R. Meachem 
General Mgr., WE AT -TV 
West Palm Beach, Fla. 



MEDIA STUDY 

Many thanks indeed for the two 
copies of your All-Media Evaluation 
Study which were safely received. 

It occurs to both of us there is much 
very useful material indeed in this 



hook. May we proceed as follows: 

1. I should like you to send and bill 
us for 51 copies of the book. 

2. Could you please send us 250 
copies of the reprint entitled "High- 
lights of the All-Media Study." We 
|'ii »|>ose to send this to all members 
together with our recommendation that 
tli<-\ get the book ordering it through 
us in order to simplify matters for you 
and make volume mailings possible. I 
sincerely trust these arrangements will 
be acceptable to you and our congratu- 
lations on an extremely useful and 



comprehensive study. 

T. J. Allard 
Executive vice president 
CARTB, Ottawa, Canada 



Could you please send me a cop) 
of the May 3rd issue of SPONSOR? If 
this is not possible, I would appreciate 
it if you could send me a tear page of 
the article "Psychology of Media." 

Waits \\ \< ki i; 

D. P. Brother & Co. 

Detroit 

• Thi- i- treated in SPONSOR'S Ul-Media Eval- 
uation Slucly now in hook form. Cost per ropy 
is St. 



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24 JANUARY 1955 



125 




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MUNCIE, INDIANA 
126 




{ 



I 



ttonald S. Frost is the newly-elected vice 
president in charge of advertising for the Bristol- 
Myers Products Division of the Bristol-Myers Co. 
As such, he'll oversee the advertising programs of 
a long list of products ranging from Ipana and 
Bufferin to Mum and Sal Hepatica 1 I in all, plus <t 
new product, Ban (deodorant I . due out next month. 
Bristol-Myers participates in the Arthur Godfrey 
Time simulcast : on radio sponsors Nora Drake and 
Godfrey Digest; on tv, Garry Moore Show, Favorite 
Playhouse, Four Star Playhouse. Also spot radio, tv. 



Edward Plant, president of Lehn & Fink- 
Products Corp. (Dorothy Gray and Tussy cosmetics, 
other cosmetics and proprietary products), made 
news when he bought re-runs of I Love Lucy 
for coast-to-coast telecasting over CBS TV 
(usually reruns are bought on a spot basis). The 
show, to debut 17 April, will be aired Sunday 
nights at 6:00 — /list a day before the first run Lucy 
telecasts. Lehn & Fink also sponsors the Ray 
Roller Show (ABC TV, 79 stations, Fridays 8:30- 
9:00 p.m.) and has a heavy spot schedule. 



II iff in in E. K«'iJ«m/. formerly national sales 
manager of KGBS-TI , San Antonio, when it was 
Oil ned by Storer Broadcasting Co., has been ap- 
]>ointed sales executive for Storer in its !\ew ) ork 
office. Before joining KGBS-Tl [now KENS-TI I, 
Kelley was associated with KTSA, San Antonio. 
Storer owns tt'SPD-AV-TV. Toledo: WAGAAM-TV. 
Atlanta: IT BRCAM-TV, Birmingham: WJW and 
II W./.-7'l . (do, land: JFJBK-AM-TI . Detroit; 
WGBS-AM-TV, Miami. KPTV (tv), Portland, 
Ore., and IT IT I A. If heeling. IT. la. 



J. Joseph Tat/lor Jr., marketing director of 

the Jin oh Ruppert Brewery (Knickerbocker beer), 
has been elected v. p. and director of advertising. 
He's been with Ruppert since L936, was appointed 
ad manager in 1948, marketing director in 1952. 
Ruppert is unique in that it sponsors few sports 
slums. Current an activity includes 15 minutes 
nightly of Steve Allen on II Rt I TV, Sew York, 

various shows and announcements on tv stations 

throughout Happens territory, and foreign 
language radio in the New ) ork area. 



SPONSOR 



"This scries has been a 
great contribution to the 
industry." 

II. C. Pick, 

Russel M. Seeds Co. 



". . . this will prove to be 
one of the most valuable 
things yet done in this busi- 
ness." 

F. Stubbs, 
KLMS 



"I mould again like to compliment you on this series." 
II. D. Everett Jr., 
Ford Motor Co. 



AU-N» edla 




. . seems everyone in our agency has found a use for it." 
J. A. BoyL , 
The Maulner Agency 




"Please order for BBDO 


"SPONSOR'S media stud- 


25 copies." 


ies are the big bargain in 




research." 


F. Barrett, 


J. Katz, 


BBDO 


The Jos. Katz Co. 



THOUSANDS ARE 

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"ALL MEDIA 
EVALUATION STUDY" 

SEND FOR YOUR COPY TODAY! 

Between the covers of this idea-filled 
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•^ the advantages and limitations of 
all major media 

•^ tips on when to use each medium 

■^ yardsticks for choosing the best 
medium for each product 

■jf pitfalls to watch for when making 
media selections 

•^ how top advertisers and agencies 
test -media 

PLUS hundreds of other flans, suggestions, for- 
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40 East 49 St. 



SERVICES INC. 

New York 17, N. Y. 



Send me copies of the 1 5 5 page "All 

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□ Payment enclosed □ Bill me □ Bill company 

Name 

Company 

Address 

City 



Zone 



State 






24 JANUARY 1955 



127 




ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



Page 

09, 111 Precision Filr 
68 



Page 

61 



RCA Equip. 
116 Raeburn 
102 



v ai ra 

Shelton Hotel 
Song Ads 



Standard Rate & Data 

Stars 

Steinman 



31 



63 

._ 124 

12.'. 

_ 123 

87 

3 



\\ \FB-T\ 

\\ \<; \ 

\\ \\ E 

WBAY 

WBEN-TV 

WCBSTV . 

WCHS-TV . 

WCOV-TV 

WDAY 

WDBJ 

WFAA-TV 

WFBM 

WFMY-TV 

WGBS-TV ... 

WHBF 

WHLM 

WHO . 

WJAR-TN 

WJPS 

\\ K BN 

WKNB 



92 

24 

113 

117 

76 

_ 33 

19 

61 

... 84 

... 87 

93 

... 71 

106 

54 

... 76 

_ 15 

... 27 

_ FC 



WKOW-TV 
\\ KRC-TV 

WKZO 
WLBC-TV . 

w mih; 

WMT 
WNHC-TV 
WSA1 
WSAZ-TV 
W'SJS l\ 
WSOK 
W^ 1 ) R 
Willi T\ 
\\ \ I I 
WWJ 



Ziv 



. 21 

. 18 

39 

51 

77 

126 

1FC 

99 

70 

96 

129 

62 

102 

83 

69 

120 

108 



65-67 



128 



SPONSOR 




quite 
a girl ! 



fl 



She's not exactly what you'd call dainty, but she 
sure gets a lot done. Louise is a blast furnace at the 
Portsmouth, Ohio, plant of the Detroit Steel Corporation 
On an average day she's likely to produce (among other 
items) about 1,200 net tons of molten pig iron with 
all the hard-working energy of a housewife turning out 
a batch of pies. Louise is pretty young as blast 
furnaces go (a year and a half old) , stands a whopping 
238 feet high, and has thus far contributed almost 
half a million tons of pig iron to the needs 
of American industry. 

We tell you about Louise because she's only 
one of many super-sized producers of both raw 
materials and finished goods you'll find from 
one end to the other of our Ohio River Valley. 
This busy area, so completely served by WSAZ-TV, 
has earned logical recognition as the industrial 
heart of America — a vastly expanding region 
where manufacturing, employment, payrolls, and 
buying power are in their happiest of heydays. 

As a market for whatever you sell, this 
can't be beaten. Nor, as an efficient way of ' 

leaching all this, can you do better than 
enlist the aid of WSAZ-TV. Here's the sole 
medium that covers the whole market — and 
in two essential ways. For one, you can 
inscribe a sweeping circle that encompasses 
dozens of major towns and cities. For 
the other, you must weigh the sphere of 
influence WSAZ-TV programming has inth 
homes and affections of almost 500,000 
TV-set-owning families. 

If you think that a share of four 
billion dollars in annual income is 
something you'd like, we'd suggest that 

you get in touch very 

quickly with the 

Katz agency. Others 

have. They are very 

happy because 

they did. 




■ * 


mb v 






Jl 







Huntlr 
Clymeston, 
Virginia 

CII.IXM 

: BASIC 

Irs 
lesl 








WSAZ 



Huntin irlttton 

-.1 and 

\Qtnce 



SPOJVSOR 
SPEAKS_ 



Tv and talent agents 

The article starting on page 35 litis 
issue is must reading for the man who 
pays the hill for television programing. 
It tells the story of the power thai two 
agents have acquired over the supply 
of tv name talent and. to an extent, 
the costs of network tv as a result ol 
the fierce competition for big names. 

We know no magic solution for the 
problem. Nor anyone to blame. The 
agents surelj can't be marked black for 
riding the boom as hard as the) know 
how. lint in the last analysis the oppor- 
tunit) to remed) the situation rests 
with the advertiser. If \ou don't want 
to pay fabulous prices for talent to- 
morrow, risk the use id new talent 
today in order to increase the supply 
of names: or consider the values of 
the show built on an idea rather than 
a millionaire-star: or explore low-cost 



programing in daytime. 

No one has to encourage talent sal- 
aries that in the long run may squeeze 
the advertiser out of television. 



Closeup on a tv test 

I here s an air of excitement at spon- 
sor's offices as we await the start this 
month of a television test in a Midwest 
market. The product is B&M beans 
and the basis of the test is that only 
television advertising will be used. The 
objective is simply to evaluate sales 
growth before and after tv. 

\\ e can't help but get excited. This 
is a baby we were in on from the start 
and a project we've been dreaming of 
ever since we started publishing. B&M 
beans has agreed through its distribu- 
tor to furnish figures on progress of 
its sales week-by-week during the 
course of the six-month campaign. 
^ on II find them reported regularly in 
SPONSOR, with the kickoff next issue. 
* * * 

Big year for spot radio 

More than one big radio station 
manager was. during the last half of 
1954, bemoaning the sharp dip in his 
national spot billings. Unmindful of 
the handsome revenue that national 
s|iot brought during a succession of 
years, many managers were proclaim- 
ing aloud that spot radio was on its 
way out along with radio networks. 

SPONSORS opinion on this subject 
was positive, deep-rooted and fre- 
quently voiced, indi\ idually and in 



print. Its opinion: that national spot 
radio as a medium has not yet achieved 
its full growth. That national spot's 
flexibility, universality, economy i link- 
ed to radio's persuasive salesmanship! 
added up to an outstanding advertising 
medium that was just on its way to 
being discovered by many advertisers. 

Now comes 1955. and with it a 
healthv influx of spot business. Sta- 
tions and reps are reporting not only a 
flock of saturation campaigns, but some 
52-week contracts as well. Some of the 
clients who dropped spot radio a year 
or two ago have now come back. 

The signs are encouraging. And the 
Radio Advertising Bureau is adding to 
them by announcing that it will devote 
far more attention to pinpointed sale 
of spot in 1955 than heretofore. 

But the warning sign is out, too. 
And this is it. 

National spot, with its emphasis on 
flexibility, permits wide choice of sta- 
tions by the men who foot the hills. 
Main indies that in years-gone-by were 
the also-rans in the race for spot busi- 
ness are now assuming the lead by 
strong radio station programing, sales 
and promotion. By and large, the 
powerhouses still hold all the trump 
cards, but they can't win by inaction, 
negative attitude, or complete top- 
management interest in the more profit- 
able l\ entitv. The challenge to the big 
radio station is clear — and 1955 will 
be a decisive year for national spot 
radio business, in determining how big 
its to be and where it will go. 



Applause 



The 4A's steps in 

The American Association of Ad- 
vertising Agencies ihis week took a 
step which can'l help but have a bene- 
ficial effect on the buyer and seller of 
radio and l\ time. The 1 \ - wenl on 
rd with clear, albeit carefully 
worded recommendations against some 
of the worst ol the pi a I ire- w liich 
have plagued both air media: rate 
deal-: excesses in merchandising done 
for clients. 

I he result won t be an overnight 
• hange among agencies which seek and 
stations which give deals. Bui one ver) 
strong influence has been added on 



tin' side of good business procedure. 

\n atmosphere in which deals flour- 
ish hurts the Inner and seller. 'I he 
seller demeans his product 1>\ hawking 
it without a firm, published rate. The 
Inner puts himself in the position of 
never knowing whether or not he has 
bought at the lowest prevailing price. 
I'oi the agenc\ as middleman, ibis is 
a particular!) uncomfortable s| l( ,i in 
be in. 

It's to be hoped that the 1 \"s rec- 
ommendations will serve to stiffen re- 
sistance to deal-making both within 
agencies and among broadcasters. The 
buyei w ho is asked to seek a deal now 
has a "bible to refei I". Similarly 



the station can oppose agenc) efforts 
to get special treatment by referring 
to the 1 As statements. 

Requests for merchandising beyond 
what the broadcaster regards as prop- 
er as well as other attempts to pressure 
the broadcaster for preference are op- 
posed in the 1 V's recommendations. 
Here again the 1 \ s is adding clarifi- 
cation on the proper relation-hip be- 
tween buyer and seller. 

I towever the recommendations work 
mil in practice, the 1 \ - committee on 
broadcast media and its stalT deserve 
the commendation of the industry for 
the job they've done (see pages 12-43 
lot complete text of recommendations). 



130 



SPONSOR 



Here are the facts . . . 



KSTP-TV 
KSTP-TV 

KSTP-TV 



KSTP-TV 




leads all Minneapolis-St. Paul TV stations in 
average weekday program ratings* from 7:00 AM 
to 10:15 PM week-in, week-out. 

is the Northwest's first television station, first with 
maximum power, first with color TV and first in 
audience. 



gives you greater coverage of the nation's 7th 
largest retail trading area than any other station 
... a market which commands FOUR BILLION 
DOLLARS in spendable income. 



has earned a listener-loyalty through superior en- 
tertainment, top talent, service and showmanship 
that means sales for you. That's why it is first in 
ratings. That's why it's your best buy. 



♦Combination Telepulse, ARB, weekly average, Novem- 
ber, 1954. 




TV 



MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL "ELKSSt 
Basic NBC Affiliate 

Edward Petry & Co., Inc., National Representatives 




in the Heart of America 




KMBC *& Kansas City serves 83 « oc 
in western Missouri and eastern Ks 
Four counties (Jackson and ^U 
Missouri, Johnson and Wyancob 
Kansas) comprise the greater K, 
City metropolitan trading area, rt 
!5th nationally in retail sales! 

KFRM ft* the State of Kansas, is aj 
to KMBC, puts your selling mess ig( 
the high- income homes of Kan as 
richest agricultural state. 




3>, 




PROGRAMS THE 

HEART OF AMERICA 

LISTENS FOR: 

RHYMALINE TIME 

with David Andrews and the KMBC] 

Tune Chasers. 

THE HAPPY HOME 

with Bea Johnson and Guests. 

FARM SERVICE PROGRAMS 

three times daily, Monday through Sat 
Livestock, grain, produce markets, music, 
weather and farm features originating 
the KMBC Service Farms. 

DINNER BELL ROUNDUP 

news, music, comedy, market reports o 1 
— with the Texas Rangers and Jed Si 

WESTERN ECHOES 

with the KMBC Texas Rangers. 

SPORTS QUIZ 

with the Experts, Sam Molen and gues 

BRUSH CREEK FOLLIES 

famed variety show Country and W 

RHYTHM AND BLUES 

Saturday night dancing party disc joe 
by B. B. Dilson. 

LOCAL News, Weather, Sports, Public V 
Interviews and Discussion Programs. 

PIUS 
BASIC CBS Radio NETWORK FEATUR 



the KMBC-KFRM radio TEAM 




ive 



A BLUE RIBBON RADIO BUY — You go first class when you go into the 
great Heart of America market with KMBC-KFRM, the Midwest's 
leading radio combination. One of the nation's foremost broadcasting 
institutions, the Team is famous for programming that draws listeners 
and holds them throughout each day's 18!/j-hour schedule. Local-flavor 
news, entertainment and information (part of the Team's vigorous 
programming) balance CBS network programs to appeal directly to 
every interest level! 

IN A BLUE CHIP MARKET — Populous and prosperous, the Heart of 
America derives its vast economic strength from many sources. Agri- 
culture, manufacturing, mining, retail and wholesale selling, transpor- 
n, oil, insurance and a multitude of other sound enterprises make 
the Hearl of America one of the country's richest, most stable markets. 
K.MI'.f ' KFRM advertising reaches the people who hold the purse strings 
in the area's high-average-income families. So when you ante up your 

radio budget, make sure you're backing a sure bet. See your Free & Peters 

Colonel for the Team's choicest availabilities. 






r"*<L*/- 



rf.e & Peters, I nc. 

: ;,! Repr, , > 



DON DAVIS, Vice President 

JOHN SCHILLING, Vice President and General Manager 

GEORGE HIGGINS, Vice President and Sales Manager 



Basic 
CBS Radio 



./^\. 




•heKMBC-KFRMrodioTEAM 

J^'/n the Heart of America! 



PERSONALITIES THE 
HEART OF AMERICA LISTENS 



Claude Dorsey, News Director, and the 
Newsbureau Staff: Bill Griffith, Rev W 
Lionel Schwan, Neal Johnson, John Thorn 
Jim Burke. 

Phil Evans, Director of KMBC Service f 
and area-famous farm experts Bob Rile 
Jim Leathers. 

Sam 

Merl 

Bea 

McCall Mage 

other broadcasting honors. 

Plus these long-famous musical group*) 
Texas Rangers, The Brush Creek Gan! 
Tune Chasers. 

PLUS 

CBS features: Amos 'n Andy, Gene *i 
Jack Benny, Edgar Bergen, Perry 
Bing Crosby, Xavier Cugat, Galen D( 
Doug Edwards, Tennessee Ernie, GangM) 
Arthur Godfrey, Guiding Light, Guns*| 
Robert Q. Lewis, Larry LeSeur, Perry I 
Ma Perkins, Ed Murrow, Mr. & Mrs 
Mr. Keen, Our Miss Brooks, New YodJ 
harmonic, Lowell Thomas, Bob Trout P 
host of other high-rated radio favorite 



and for Television, it's KMB 

Kansas City's Most Power\ 
TV Station 



s hl: 



t ? \ 



magazine radio and tv advertisers use 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



50< per copy « $ 8 per yeai 



HiisiHhe 
land of 



• • • 



v 
-? 



^ 



$ 



sconsm's most show-full station 



I 

WBG [ . 







/It 



lOO.Ooo 

Chanel. 

HAYDN R EVANS, Gen Mgr — 





ISIDE STORY 
OF A TV TEST 

page 31 

Esso : 19 years 
of spot radio news 
sponsorship 




* 
* 



page 34 



. alent agents: how 

can you keep from 

paying their price? 

page 36 



• 



pot radio: 
off to a fast 
'55 start 

page 38 




Industry reactions 
to 4 A's radio-tv "bible' 





getting 
picture-lazy? 

ige 42 




Rep WEED TELEVISION 



LON TV FILM 
page 47 




58% of W-I-T-H's audience have 
incomes of $5,000 or more! 




W-I-T-H's audience 

by income groups 

Just about everybody in the business knows 
that WITH has the biggest listening audience 
in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. They 
know, too, that WITH provides the lowest 
cost-per-thousand listeners of any station in 
town. 

But there's a lot of talk about the quality of 
this audience. The A. C. Nielsen Company has 
recently made a survey which shows the com- 
position of the listening audience for WITH and 
one other Baltimore station. The other station 
is a powerful network outlet. 



— In Baltimore 




Audience of Network Station A 

by income groups 

The upper group — families with incomes of 
$5,000 a year or more — make up 58 '[ of the 
total WITH audience. Only 48' ; of the net- 
work's audience is in this group. In the middle 
group — incomes from 3 to 5 thousand dollars 
a year— WITH has 33';, the network 37' ,. 
In the lower group — under $3,000 a year — 
WITH has 9%, the network l.V ] . 

So don't worry about "prestige" when you're 
buying radio time in Baltimore. WITH gives 
you all the "prestige" you need. Ask your 
For joe man! 




TOM TINSLEV, President 



REPRESENTED BY FORJOE & CO. 




SAC demands Advertisers may pay as much as 15% more for film commercials, if SAG 
15% increase gets its way in upcoming contract sessions. Negotiations began in 
Los Angeles 1 February. John Wheeler is attorney representing Film 
Producers Association of New York. Dave Miller (Y&R) and Jack Devine 
(JWT) attend as observers for 4 A's. New SAG demands represent 15% 
daily pay increase for actors, 15% increase of existing reuse pay- 
ments. Union also wants to end unrestricted reuse rights advertisers 
now have if they pay maximum — $650 per actor for network commercial. 

-SR- 

New spot data Problem of finding out what your competitor is doing in spot radio 
due in April moves closer to solution. Target date for publication first "Spot 

Radio Register" by Jim Boerst and N. C. "Duke" Rorabaugh has been set 
for 25 April, covering activity first quarter this year. Report will 
be based on data from 200 stations in top 43 markets. Questionnaires 
to stations hit mails 15 February. Service hopes to cover 500 sta- 
tions eventually. (See "Spot radio spending: out in the open in 
•55," 10 January. ) 

~SR- 

Evening net radio According to latest Nielsen nationwide net radio ratings, "evening 
higher than day once-a-month" programs still out pu ll da ytime show s — despite tv in- 
roads. Nighttime shows which rank as far down as 5th and 6th place 
on rating scale deliver as many radio homes as show which ranks first 
in daytime and there are more people per radio home at night. 
(NBC Radio has unveiled Starch study of evening radio — subtitled 
"Last night 56,250,000 listened to evening radio ..." It documents 
size and characteristics of night audience. Details on study appeared 
in SPONSOR 24 January, page 64.) 

-SR- 

K&E, McCann-E. Can one agency buy time for another's accounts? K&E and McCann-Erick- 
spot teamwork son say "yes." When McCann-Erickson got Mennen shave products and 
Afta-Shave on 1 January, it conferred with K&E, one of Mennen agen- 
cies. Following arrangement resulted: K&E buys radio for all Mennen 
products. McCann-Erickson buys tv for all Mennen products. Each 
agency cross-bills other for cost of time of other agency's products. 
Each agency collects commissions on its accounts only. Client likes 
it because timebuyers can get better time for total budget and longer- 
range campaigns than when products are split. 

-SR- 

Barbasol returns Barbasol began 20-week spot radio campaign in January (through Erwin, 
to spot radio Wasey) after 3 years out of medium. Campaign includes 30 announce- 
ments weekly in New York, 20 weekly in Chicago, with 5 cities to be 
added in February. Barbasol is one of many advertisers buying lo nger- 
range, h i gher-frequenc y campaigns than in last few years. (For 
other 1955 spot radio trends, see story page 38.) 

SPONSOR, Vnlume 9, No. 3. 7 February 1055. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications, Inc. Executive, Editorial. Advertising, Circulation Offices. 40 E. 49th St Not 
York 17. Primed at 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore, Md. $8 a year In US $9 elsewhere. Entered at second class matter 29 Jan. 1919 at Baltimore poatofflce under Act of S Mar. 1879 



Itl I'OIC'I TO M»0\soits lor 7 February 1955 



Debate starts 
on ARF report 



WDEL-TV sold; 
Meredith gets CBS 



Probe season 
for radio-tv 



Channels 2-6 
in no danger 



RTES workshop 
on Negro radio 



NARTB boards 

O.K. am-tv 

research 



Look for more debate on ARF ratings report now that industry has had 
chance to digest voluminous charts and analysis. Daniel Denenholz, 
Katz Agency research-promotion director, started public discussion 
in talk before recent RTES buying and selling seminar. Denenholz 
felt ARF recommended too small a sample size for accuracy in measur- 
ing radio and took issue with set tuning as measure of exposure and 
household as unit of measurement. Vigorous rebuttal came from G. 
Maxwell Ule, research v. p. of K.&E. and chairman of ARF report work- 
ing committee. 

-SR- 
Big station sales and major changes in affiliation continue to make 
news. On station-sale front, WDEL-TV, Wilmington (which with pro- 
posed power increase will blanket Philadelphia), was sold by John and 
Hale Steinman to Paul Harron — owner of WIBG-AM-FM, Philadelphia — for 
$3,712,500. Meanwhile, just after losing CBS TV affiliation contract 
for KPHO-TV, Phoenix, Meredith Publishing Co. won CBS TV affiliation 
for its 5 oth er stations; WOW-AM-TV, Omaha, KCMO-AM-TV, Kansas City, 
WHEN (am), Syracuse (WHEN-TV already is CBS TV affiliate). In Minne- 
apolis Harry M. Bitner and his son bought share-time Ch. 11 stations 
WTCN-TV and WMIN-TV for $3.1 million (price includes WTCN radio). 

-SR- 
Nat ion's lawmakers and courts are becoming more involved in radio 
and tv. Current legislative-judicial activity includes: (1) Senate 
Commerce Committee probe of networks. (2) Senate Judiciary Committee 
investigation of "monopoly" in radio and tv. (3) On local level, 
Brooklyn Grand Jury investigation of "bait-and-switch" air adver- 
tising. Admen queried feel Senate may slow down network expansion 
of option hours which has increased problem of clearing good spot 
film time. 

-SR- 
Authoritative newsletter, Television Digest scotches trade reports 
that Navy is demanding television spectrum covering Channels 2-6 for 
its own use. Digest quotes government officials to effect such move 
is afoot. (Twentieth edition of semi-annual Television Factbook was 
published by Television Digest late last month, including directories 
of stations and networks with rates, personnel, facilities and lists 
of all new-station c.p. permits outstanding, applications pending.) 

-SR- 
Fact that good Negro radio programing consists of something more than 
r hythm-&-blues music one of major points made by Negro radio panel at 
RTES workshop meeting late last month. Other point: Stations too 
often lack full facts on their audience and their markets. (See 
SPONSOR "Negro Radio Section," 20 September 1954, page 47.) 

-SR- 
Sponsors stand to gain from action by NARTB at radio and tv board 
meetings late last month. Boards each voted for more a ir media 
f act s. Radio group suggested primer on radio as ad medium which 
will tie together all radio research. Tv board voted to further 
means of getting 3 important tv facts: How many homes have tv, what 
stations are tuned to in these homes and what public thinks about 
tv advertising. 



SPONSOR 



GUILD SCORES AGAIN WITH FILM SYNDICATION'S 

FIRST DAYTIME SERIES 

FOR ACROSS-THE-BOARD PROGRAMMING! 



^ 



5 quarter-hours per week 



jtt 



LOW. 



■$ttffl 



r*i<i. 



R* 



TV'S BIGGEST VALUE 

YOUR LOWEST COST-PER-THOUSAND BUY! 



Daytime ratings are climbing throughout the country — yet 
time-costs are lower and time-clearance easier. Now is the 
time to stake out your claim in the sales-productive daytime 
. . . and IT'S FUN TO REDUCE is the one show that's 
designed to bring you more viewers, more sales ... at LOWER 
cost! More than just an entertainment vehicle, IT'S FUN TO 
REDUCE is actually a keen-edged sales and merchandising 
tool that has proved its ability to bring fast results. Contact 
GUILD today and get full details! 



A PROVED WINNER! 

IT'S FUN TO REDUCE has been tested 
and proved as a "live" show in Pitts- 
burgh by one of the nation's largest 
retail chain operations! 

Successful? Beyond the sponsor's wild- 
est dreams — as a matter of fact, more 
than 35(),()()() women visited the sponsor's 
stores specifically to ask for a "FUN TO 
REDUCE" exercise chart . . . and the 
show has consislatitly outrated every other 
local day lime show in (he Pittsburgh area! 



llMJiB.II.H 



SALES-PRODUCING 
MERCHANDISING GIMMIC 



• Exercise Chart Giveaways 

• Premium Phonograph Records 

• Dramatic Point-Of- Purchase 
Displays 



T 



,t.'f«U» 



GUILD 



FILMS 



460 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, N. Y. • MUrray Hill 8-5365 



advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



B«\ JI beans: hlotv-hy-hhnv story oi n tv ti'st 

Using only tv, B&M beans has just started an advertising test campaign in a 
Midwestern market. Sales resulis will be attributable to tv because no other 
medium is used. SPONSOR will report on results as they happen 

Esso: lit ui'itrs of rutlio news sponsorship 

Spot radio continues to spearhead advertising of this gas and oil company in 18 
states from Maine to Louisiana. Five-minute newscasts on 52 radio, 18 tv sta- 
tions are basic format; 403 independent dealers buy time locally 

Tulent agents: alternatives to pitying their price 

To keep down tv talent costs, admen advise: keep away from name stars, use 
low-cost panel shows, dramatic presentations with less well-known players, put 
more emphasis on good writing. 

Spot rutlio: oil' to fust '55 stttrt 

Leading reps and ad agencies report a growing resurgence in spot radio interest 
among advertisers, with the first few weeks of 1955 showing activity above com- 
parable period last year 

I n<{ ii.v l rif reacts to I \'s reeommentltttions 

Opinion among broadcasters, industry groups and agency spokesmen generally 
endorses the recent 4 As recommendations; some feel they need implementa- 
tion, ask the 4 A's to put teeth in their recommendations 

Are tr commercials getting pieture-lttzg? 

Look-alike tv plugs weaken sales messages, says Art Bellaire. Copymen have 
become picture "copycats," must seek new visual ideas 



inr,.; i.iiimhct ON TV FILM 



SHO in if lion Hint tv business: stiles untl hetttlttehes 

Here are solid facts and figures on the $80 million film syndication business, 
its present status and future direction. Data covers sales trends, competition 
in field, new shows, color tv, explains why a half-hour film show costs $5,000 in 
one market and another such show costs $10 ir, another market. Study includes 
charts which throw light on whether or not film reruns lose audience (Nielsen), 
also analyze audience composition of leading film show types (ARB) 



;/ 

34 
SO 

:t3t 

40 

12 
17 



/:; 



COM I NC 



Coca-Cola goes modem 

Traditional tone has disappeared from Coke's advertising, and here's how its 

substantal air campaigns will be affected 2 I I'**!*. 

\re tv commercials getting talent-lazy? 

More observations by Art Bellaire on tv commercial triteness. Next he scores 

the over-use of personality salesmen, encourages originality in talent selection 21 I't'O. 



Volume 9 Number 3 
7 February 1955 






DEPARTMENTS 



AGENCY AD LIBS 

49TH & MADISON 

TIMEBUYERS 1 

NEW & RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Jerome Pickman 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 

P. S. 

NEW TV STATIONS 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

RADIO RESULTS 

AGENCY PROFILE, L. B. Lindquist 

SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUND-UP 

NEWSMAKERS 1 

SPONSOR SPEAKS . 1 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard P! 

Vice President: Jacob A. Evans 

Editorial Director: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jafll 

Associate Editor: Evelyn Konrad 

Department Editor: Lila Lee Seaton 

Assistant Editors: Keith Trantow, Al ZamelkaB 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe Csdi 

Editorial Assistant: Florence Ettenberg 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice Pres.-Advg. Director: Robert P. Mendelsor 

Advertising Department: fcdwm D. Uoope> 

(Western Manager), Homer Griffith (Sou'h 

west Manager), Arnold Alpert (Midwest Man 

ager), John A. Kovchok (Production Man 

ager), Charles L. Nash 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Su!» 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Morton (I 

Kahn, Minerva Mitchell 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott 

Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 

Accounting Department: Eva M. Sanfor< 

Laura Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Janet Whittier 






Published blneckl) bj> SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
combined nllh TV. Executive I nil < niulaiion. mi 
lilveillsiug ml,,,', in i: nun si (48th & Madison! 
New York IT, N *. Telephone: MUiruy Hill 8-2771 

HI i: Or«nd Ave. Phone: SUperll 

Da I Office 8708 Carlisle St. Phone: BUI 
I Vllgclcs Office: Wis; Sunset llmilevaij 

Phone HollyM I i 8089. Printing Office :<110 Hi 

Ave., Iialllinorc II. M.I Subscriptions: United Steia 
fs a and rorelgn $9. single copies 50i 

Pilnted in V.S.A kddreia all ciiricspcmclcnce to H 
I 9 It SI Ken Ymk 17 N V Ml mv Hill X 277't 
Copyright Hi:.... SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



don't "PICK BLIND" 

IN SHREVEPORT! 




look at KWKH s HOOPERS! 



Latest Hooper figures are eye-openers. 
Look how we're liked by the hometown 
folks in Metropolitan Shreveport — and 
they represent just 15% of the listeners 
in our total coverage! 



J AN. -FEB., 1954 


-SHARE OF AUDIENCE 




TIME 


KWKH 


STATION B 


STATION C 


STATION D 


STATION E 


MON. thru FRI. 
8 00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon 

MON. thru FRI. 
12:00 Noon - 6:00 P.M. 
SUN. thru SAT. EVE. 
6:00 P.M. • 10:30 P.M. 


38.1 
44.3 
54.6 


19.5 
21.2 


6.2 
9.2 
11.2 


16.0 
6.1 

8.5 


19.5 
19.4 
24.0 



look at KWKH's SAMS AREA! 



S.A.M.S. shows KWKH with 22.3% more daytime listeners 
than all the other Shreveport stations combined. But cost-per- 
thousand-homes is 46.4% less than the second Shreveport 



station: 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 
I TEXAS 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



The Branham Co. 
Represenfatives 



Henry Clay 
General Manager 



Fred Watkins 
Commercial Manager 




LOUISIANA 



! ARKANSAS 




NEW YORK, 233 W. 49th ST.. N.Y. C. CI 55044 DETROIT, 16603 E. WARREN RD. ( TU 5-5811 DALLAS, 4745 N. CENTRAL EXPRESSWAY, JU 3150 SALT LAKE C.l 8 



SPONSOR 







THE BIG PLAYBACK... 

TV's most exciting all-sports show! 

Available first run — in many markets. Omaha, and real sock ratings all across the country. 



Sponsored by The Ethyl Corporation (through 
i.B.D.&O.) in 55 cities for the past two years, this 
uarter-hour TV film series is immediately available 
i all markets at a price that can't be beat. This is the 
how that cost this important advertiser less than 90V 
er thousand viewers. 

It's the highest rated quarter-hour sports show 
a more than twenty major cities... racking up a 
8 in Tulsa, 24 in Indianapolis, another 24 in 



• Each show features celebrities such as Joe Louis, 
The Four Horsemen of Notre Dame, Eddie Arcaro, 
Jackie Robinson, Sammy Snead, Doc Blanchard, 
Florence Chadwick— and hundreds of others. 

•Jimmy Powers, famed sports writer, and Bill Stern, 
noted sports commentator, give you 52 all-request 
programs . . . the greatest moments in sports. Write, 
wire or telephone us at once for the status of THE 
BIG PLAYBACK in your area. 



SSQSB 



TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORPORATION, 233 WEST 49th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N.Y. • CIRCLE 5-5044 

The only company providing advertisers with Hollywood and New York custom 
produced national shows, syndicated programming , and commercials— all on film. 





BLDG.. PHONE 3-3903 SAN FRANCISCO. 995 MARKET ST.. DO 2-1060 ATLANTA. 3130 MAPLE DRIVE. N. E.. EX 6100 CHICAGO, 230 N. MICHIGAN, FR 2-3696 

7 FEBRUARY 1955 7 







e 






WENATCHEE 

A 286 million dollar market 
in the heart of Washington 
State .... surrounded by 
seven to nine thousand foot 
mountains — natural physical 
barriers to other station 
penetration. 

THE RANCH & FARM 
RADIO STATION 
KPQ Wenatchee is ABC- 
NBC radio for the NEW 
IRRIGATION FRONTIER, 
the great Columbia River 
Basin. 

CAPTIVE, BUT ACTIVE! 
KPQ's Wenatchee market is 
isolated, BUT CAPTIVE, 
AND ACTIVE. Market rec- 
ords verify that Wenatchee 
is the Apple Capital of the 
World. 

PER CAPITA INCOME 

16% above national average 

SALES PERFORMANCE 

1 60 / above national average 

STARTING OUR 26th YEAR 





5000 WATT? 
560 K.C. 
WENATCHEE 
WASHINGTON 



REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES, 

Moore and Lund, Seattle, Wash. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES, 
Forjoe and Co. Incorporated 




by Bob Foreman 

fffeiif if M'fifioit is hey t» tv success 

\- am studenl of the drama or tyro playwright can tell 
you, a play, if it's to succeed, must oiler ready identification 
with its audience. You (as a viewer) have to root for some- 
one in the performance — and, as you sit there, you actually 
become that person. This is, of course, just as elementary to 
television drama as it is to that seen on Broadway. But since 
television reaches masses of people cutting through all strata 
of income, education, background and ages, identification is 
the leading cause for the sameness in tv programing. 

In tv especially, it takes an artist, indeed, to be able to win 
an audience over when the characters he fashions and the 
-lories into which he places them are off-beat: period piece-, 
foreign locales, farce, fantasy, etc. Here it requires even 
greater ingenuity to create the "quicksilver" that must flow 
betwixt players and viewers. Minus it, there is an impassable 
moat dividing tv tube from living room chair, footlights from 
theater. Even fantasy must build upon credulity and farce 
upon believability if it is not to be considered absurd by the 
egocentrics who make up an audience. For example, it takes 
as vibrant a personality as Mary Martin an entire act of Peter 
Pan to "make you believe" — and then there's a lump in your 
throat over the impending death of an invisible sprite known 
as Tinker Bell. 

What has all this to do with tv fare? Everything. It's the 
reason for the plethora of husband and wife shows — for so 
many troublesome (but lovable, of course!) kids — for so 
many cynical next door neighbors. The audience itself is 
made up of millions of husbands and wives and just such 
kid-. And neighbors are always a bit odd. 

It's this Identification Quotient that gives the basic appeal 
to Lassie — identification for every member of the family 
(hence it - phenomenally high viewers-per-set). It's this same 
\.i). that gives Mama its tremendous tug (despite the fact that 
the series is a period piece replete with foreign accent). It's 
the reason Ann Sothern is so popular: as Susie MacNamara 
she represents, in addition to the Secretariat of the World, all 
working girl- a- well. 

Perhaps it point- mil the problems in Life U ith Father, one 
of the literary gem> and theatrical successes of our genera- 
tion. Translated for tv. however. sen-iti\el\ and faithfully 
(in mv opinion I. il -till may not give sufficient identification 
i Please turn to page 92 I 



SPONSOR 



We're getting more people in growing San Diego ! 








38.1 % more than in 1950! 

For a County total of 769,200! (Calif. Taxpayers 

Assoc, estimate, Jan. 1 , 1955.) 

Even in Jan. 1954, the city of San Diego alone 
had more people than Newark, Atlanta 
or Indianapolis ! (Sis. Mgt. '54) 

More people, making more, spending more and 
watching Channel 8 more than ever before! 



KFMB 



WRATHER-AI.VAREZ BROAIK ASTING, INC 

REPRESENTED BY PETRV 




SAN DIEGO. CALIF. 



America's more market 



to cover the 

NEW YORK 

Metropolitan area... 




^ 




ttrt 



. . . use one of 

America's 2 

GREAT independents! 

WINS 

■oio ij 



I ll I I I I I I M I I I M I III I 



50,000 watts . . . 

. . . £fc Ziowrs a da?/ 

SAN FRANCISCO SALES: 

Chuck Christianson 
DOuglas 2-2536 

CHICAGO SALES: 

George Clark 
RAndolph 607 12 




iimi 



to cover the 



II III I Ml \ SAN FRANCISCO 



sponsor invites letters to the editor, 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 



MULTI-MARKET FILM 

I would like you to know how much 
I enjoyed reading the article entitled 
"How to use multi-market film shows" 
in the December 27th issue of spon- 
sor. 

As is usually the case with your arti- 
cles, this one is definitely informative, 
and therefore worthwhile. However. 
my reason for writing, and what im- 
pressed me, is the completely fair man- 
ner in which you presented your facts. 

R. R. Kaufman 

President, Guild Films Co., Inc. 

New York 



WRONG LETTER 

Among the highlight trends in radio 
spol sales for 1955, your comprehen- 
sive "Year-End Report on Radio-Tv" 
December 27 predicted "more selling 
based on specialized audiences," such 
as the music-and-news audience ". . . 
stations like WQXR, New York. 
WFLN, Philadelphia, and KLAC, Los 
Angeles, are landing national business 
based on their 'good music' research." 

Having just completed the biggest 
business year in its history with a 24- 
hour schedule devoted entirely to 
"good music" and news, KFAC, Los 
Angeles, heartily agrees with you in 
every detail except one small but im- 
portant call letter. KFAC's enthusias- 
tic sponsors know very well which sta- 
tion has meant "good music" to South- 
ern California listeners for more than 
10 years, but wouldn't all timebuyers 
like to know that you meant KFAC? 
Calvin J. Smith 
General Manager 
KFAC, "The Music Station" 
Los Angeles 



RADIO VITAL 

sponsor's readers can get some per- 
spective on changes in radio through 
an incident at CFCF. A man who was 
heard over CFCF 33 years ago, said 
recently on our Good Neighbor Club, 
{Please turn to page 14) 



Bay area... 




. . . use one of 

America's 2 

GREAT independents! 

KYA 

The Personality Station 
. . . 1260 k. c. 



NEW YORK SALES: 

John Barry 
BRyant 9-6000 

CHICAGO SALES: 

George Clark 
RAndolph 6-0712 



10 



SPONSOR 




EMO 



TO ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES 



: TV SPOTS 



Eleven of America's most successful agencies are 
using Caravel to produce quality TV spot com- 
mercials. Reasons for their choice, they tell us, 
are: follow- through service; on-time deliveries; 
and personal responsibility of the specialists 
in Caravel's TV Department. 

The roster of products for which Caravel has 
recently produced TV commercials includes: 



• Borden 

• Buf f erin 

• Buick 

• Dunhill 

• Fab 

• Geritol 



• Gillette 

• Goodrich 

• Ivory 

• Jell-0 



• Mistol-Mist 

• Nabisco 

• Nash 

• Packard 



• Johnson & Johnson • Socony-Vacuum 

• Kelvinator • U. S. Treasury Bonds 



•With our clients' permission, we are glad to show 
our TV work to executives of interested agencies. 

Write or telephone today for our new bulletin 
on TV spots, "For Advertising Agency Executives." 



CARAVEL FILMS, INC 

730 Fifth Ave., New York 19, N. Y. 
Telephone: Circle 7-6110 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



11 



^ 






in of I 



to*****' I 




Juvenile "plus' 



\r 




CHO '« MARKETS 



STI " AVAILABLE 






; 8 io^ 






OREIGN LEGION 



C%«ew "0#?/" CraMe 



By Allah! This program has everything! 

The French Foreign Legion ! The intriguing and 
mysterious desert. Native peoples and animals 
and customs. Unprecedented government coop- 
eration for highest authenticity. 

Add a name star like Buster Crabbe . . . and his 
son "Cuffy", in a role children of all ages will 
envy . . . and scripts that weave them all into top 
TV viewing — and you get a glimmer of the tre- 
mendous appeal of this program. 



mplete, 
integrated i 



Included in the package is a built-in merchandis- 
ing program featuring 36,000 free premiums for 
every market ordered : trading cards . . . auto- 
graphed photos of Buster and Cuffy . . . comic 
books . . . membership cards and certificates. Plus 
free posters and special commercials, also free. 

It's all absolutely free — and trouble free, when 
you buy the show. 

"Captain Gallant" is a show whose performance 
in the living room and at the cash register will 
delight every sponsor. For full details and avail- 
abilities, call, write or wire — fast! 



inminniiii 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 



477 MADISON AVENUE, N. Y. C. • PLAZA 5-2101 



QUALITY 

IS OUR BUSINESS 



For COMPLETE 
FILM PROCESSING 




MOVIELAB FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 6-0360 



49TH b MADISON 

(Continued from page 10) 

that radio today moves in the daily 
lives of people like the sun and fresh 
air. 

Sixty-five-year-old Isidore Goldberg 
of 5485 Terrebonne Avenue made this 
remark in referring to the tremendous 
strides that radio has taken since the 
days when he appeared before a mi- 
crophone. 

Mr. Goldberg was heard in 1922 
over CFCF, producing and singing in 
minstrel, musical and comedy shows. 
At that time, there were no other radio 
stations in the Montreal area and a 
mere handful in all of North America. 
He says that station identification was 
given after every number in those 
days, and not as now, at each quarter 
hour. This was to insure that people 
who were hearing him on a crystal set 
with earphones know what station they 
were listening to, as reception was 
very poor. 

Mr. Goldberg, who in his radio days 
was known as "The Singing Bache- 
lor," today feels that radio is a vital 
part of people's lives, not as it was 33 
years ago. Goldberg says he is very 
much aware of the fact that as a per- 
son can open the window to receive 
fresh air, they can flick a switch to 
hear up-to-the-minute news and com- 
plete entertainment. 

Arthur Weinthal 
Promotion Manager 
CFCF, Montreal 



ALL MEDIA OBJECTIVITY 

I finally found the time to finish 
reading your "All-Media Evaluation 
Study" and I should like to congratu- 
late you for a top-notch job on a sub- 
ject which is anything but easy to 
cover. I particularly enjoyed reading 
the comments about Life's 4-Media 
study that was done by Politz. 

I was certainly impressed by the ob- 
jectivity of your study — something 
that is becoming rare in this day and 
age for some "vertical" publications. 
Again, congratulations on a splendid 
piece of reporting. 

George Anthony 

Media Director 

Stromberger, LaVene, McKenzie 

Los Angeles 

• SPONSOR'* All-Moilin Study 1* available in 
booh form at $-1.00 per ropy. Addrcft* orflrra to 
SPONSOR Services Inc. at 10 E. 49th St. 



14 



SPONSOR 



FIRST IN SPRINGFIELD 



Springfield, Massachusetts, November 1954 Hooper 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



MONDAY 

THROUGH 

SATURDAY 


WTXL 


"A" 


"B" 


"C" 


"D" 


"E" 




"G" 


"H" 


Other 

AM & 

FM 


7 :00 A.M.-12 NOON 


28.1 


20.6 


19.8 


13.4 


7.9 


4.6 


2.7 


1.6 


0.7 


0.5 


12:00 NOON-6 :00 P.M. 


33.1 


16.0 


12.1 


14.7 


7.6 


7.3 


4.2* 


3.1* 


2.0 


1.7 


6 :00P.M.-8 :00 P.M. 


34.0 


20.7 


17.5 


8.4 


7.4 


10.5 






0.4 


1.1 



*The above measurements are adjusted to compensate for the fact that Radio Stations "P" and "G" sign off 

at 4 :30 in November. 





WTXL is first in 19 out of 26 rated half hours. Saturation spots on WTXL 
get high rated periods all day. 

WTXL is the only full-time independent station in the Springfield markel 




MEMBER STATION 



For avails and other information, 
call Larry Reilly, Gen. Mgr., WTXL, 
Springfield, Mass., RE-9-4768 or any 
office of the Walker Representation 
Co., Inc. 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



15 






Only 




STATIONS 

are powerful enough 
and popular enough 
to register audiences 
in radio survey ratings 
of both Los Angeles and 
San Diego. 

Of these top four, 
KBIG is 

• the only independent 

• the least expensive 

• the lowest cost per 
thousand families 






9 

KBIG 

T/ie (atolma Slot/on 
10,000 Watts 

740 on o, y a° 1 ur 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, Colifornia 
Telephone: Hollywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc. Inc. 



II. A. Karhun, Malcotm-Howafd Advertising, 
Chicago, is very tv conscious "because we have been 
so active in this field since the very beginning of 
commercial tv." He rarely bases buying decisions 
on tv ratings. "We insist on knowing just who our 
audience is," says he, "and whether it's the audience 
the client wants to reach. Then, into that time 
segment, we put announcement copy or a program 
cued directly to that audience. We have had the 
greatest success with saturation programing. In 
other words, ive dont try to be all things to all men. 
We pick a particular audience and we .concentrate 
on that audience with heavy bombardment, rather 
than attempting to bin coverage or scattered shot tv 
advertising. This type of concentration has worked 
very well for a considerable number of our clients." 



Anne Small, Scheideler. Beck & Werner, Neiv 
York, looks at spot radio 1955 in a new light. "It's 
an advertising medium in its own right," says she. 
"Not just the father of tv, or something to be 
used to supplement tv coverage. There's a separate 
and distinct radio audience, and this radio audience 
exists both in radio-only and in tv areas. 
Idvertisers are finding spot radio an attractive 
Inn again, partly because most of the rates hare 
been adjusted to the times, partly because they 
find that they're missing part of their potential 
market it they ignore this medium. Also they're 
using a different spot radio Strategy. W here five 
announcements weekly might have been 'saturation 
a la 1945,' it takes 20 or more weekly to 
qualify for the term one decade later.' 



Henry IV. Cleefl. Mars, hall. & Pratt Division, 

WcCann-Erickson, New York, buys all media foi Ins 
accounts. "We converted to the integrate,! , rcative 
media, or 'all-media' operation about one year ago," 
he told sponsor. "/ feel that this system does make 
it possible to buy media more creatively, because 
it gires the buyer greater perspective over the 
strategy and problems of his accounts. ind it 
doesn't mean neglei ring one medium lor the others. 
by am means. I see as many of the reps of all 
media as I need to. ami Still hare time l« Ion 
merlin for five accounts. I in able to gel a feel of 
each ae,, >unt and its problems as a whole. As 
all-media buyers, wi ected in make 

budget recommendations that include a media 
breakdown. To do this, we have to be close 
to the accounts marketing problem'.:' 



16 



SPONSOR 




Even before their eyes are open, folks around Dallas 
tune in to WFAA's Early Birds, the oldest breakfast-type comedy-variety 
show in' the nation. For 25 years, the Early Birds have given 
eye-opening performances with music . . . patter . . . audience participation. 

The selling power of the Early Bird program is outstanding 
over the Southwest. One national food company has been a sponsor 
for 6 years; a drug firm for 7. Many others have found the 
Early Birds to be top-notch salesmen for a variety of products. 

Latch on to the high-flying Early Birds of WFAA. 
Then watch your sales go soaring! 



See the Petry man for details. 



A CI*** Channel Sorvic* of th» Daitot Morning N«w« 



WRAA 

Alex Keese. Manager 

Geo. Utley, Commercial Manager 

Edward Petry & Co., Inc., Representative 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



17 



It's the same difference . . . 









■ 



? 







s 



IB I 




The difference that sets WCBS-TV 
apart from all other stations in 
New York is its policy to devote 
the same effort, ingenuity and 
production skill to each of its 
programs, whether in the field of 
entertainment or in the area of 
education and information. 



It is this "difference" that last 
year won for WCBS-TV the largest 
average audiences in New York, 
day and night. 

It is this same "difference" that in 
1954 earned for WCBS-TV high 
praise from the critics and the 
community for the largest schedule 
of public interest programs of any 
station in New York— plus a 
George Foster Peabody medal. 

Finally, it's this same "difference" 
that last year persuaded advertisers 
to invest more of their dollars 
with WCBS-TV than with any other 
New York television station. 



■ 



This distinction can make a big 
difference in sales to any advertiser 
who wants to get the most out of 
television in 1955. 



■ 



WCBS-TV New York, Channel 2 

CBS OWNED. Represented by 
CBS Television Spot Sales. 



i 



SALES GO 
OVER the TOP 

when your sales message 
goes to • • • 




Tv\'?'°°0 




MICHIGAN 



JACKSON 



INDIANA 



OHIO 



FORT WAYNE 



WKZO-TV (Channel 3) has 100,000 watts of power — 
has a new 1000-foot tower — offers you 514,000 families 
nit bin its grade li coverage urea! 

So more than ever, WKZO-TV ran help yon «:<» over the 
top in Western Michigan! 




100,000 WATTS VIDEO • CHANNEL 3 • 1000' TOWER 



WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDSKALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDSKALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Anociated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 




•TV 



OFFICIAL BASIC CBS FOR WESTERN MICHIGAN 
Avery- Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



20 



SPONSOR 



New and renew 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



1. New on Radio 

SPONSOR 



Networks 



Amcr Motors (Nash), Det 
Bristol Myers (Vitalis), NY 
Bristol Myers < Vitalis* . NY 

Burton Dixie Corp, Chi 

Gcnir.il Prods 

Ccneral Prods 

Mary Ellen fames & Jellies. Berkeley. 

Cal 
O'Keefe & Merritt (gas ranges!, LA 

Pearson Pharmacal, NY 
Pharmacco, Kenilworth, N| 

Philco (phonographs & radios'. Phila 
Reducing Inst. LA 

Rexall Drug. LA 

Studebaker-Packard (Packard), South 

Bend, Ind 
Union Oil of Cal, LA 

Vitamin Corp of Amer, Newark, N| 



AGENCY 




STATIONS 


Ceyer Adv, Det 




NBC full net 


DCSS, NY 




KNX-CPRN 23 


DCSS. NY 




KNX-CPRN 23 


Robert B. Wesley & A 

Chi 
Dean Simmons 


soc. 


MBS 250 
CPRN 23 


Cean Simmons 




CPRN 23 


Ralph fcwell. Oakland, 


Cal 


CPRN 22 


Atchison. Donahue & H 
den, LA 

DCSS, NY 


ay- 


CPRN 12 

MBS 570 
CPRN 23 


Hutchins Adv, Phila 
N. B. Scott. LA 




MBS 565 
CPRN 23 


BDDO. LA 




CBS 206 


Maxon. Det 




ABC 350 


Y&R, Hollywood 




CPRN 23 


BBDO. NY 




CBS 206 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Fibber-McCec & Molly; Sun-Th 10-10:15 pm; Feb 

16 & 17 only 
Frank Coss News; alt M, W. F & T. Th, Sat 5:45- 

5:55 pm; PST; (an 24, 49 wks 
Sunday Night News; 7:55-8 pm PST; |an 30; 48 

Les Paul & Mary Ford; W, F 7:45-7:55 pm ; Feb 

16; 55 season 
Story Master; Sat 7:45-7:55 am; 9:05-9:15 am. 

PST; |an 22; 52 wks 
Story-Teller; Sat 10:30-10:45 am PST; |an 22; 

52 wks 
Harry Babbitt Show; alt days 7:45-8 am PST; )an 

24; 55 wks 
Memory Lane; Sat 10-10:25 am PST; |an 22; 52 

Multi-Message; M-F 8-8:30 pm; |an 24; 13 wks 

Wendy Warren & The News; M, W. F, 9:05-9:15 
am PST; Jan 17; 13 wks 

Phonorama; Sat 11:30-11:55 am; Feb 19; 52 wks 

Don Otis Show, Sat 11:30-11.45 am PST; |an 15; 
13 wks 

Amos & Andy Music Hall; Th 9:30-9:55 <6 min- 
ute sponsorship); Feb 16 & Feb 17 only 

Your Packard Reporter; M. W, Th, F 8:25, 9:25, 
10:25 pm; T 8:25, 10:25 pm; Feb 7; 2 wks 

Frank Coss News; M-F 7:30-7:45 am PST; Feb 
7; 52 wks 

Amos & Andy Music Hall; M, Th 9:30-9:55 pm 
(six minute sponsorship); Jan 31 & Feb 24 only 




i 



Hub 
Hood 1 3) 



2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Bristol-Myers, NY 

CBS-Columbia 
Colgate-Palmolive. NY 


DCSS, NY 

Ted Bates, NY 

Wm Esty, NY 


CBS 206 

CBS 206 
NBC full net 


Arthur Codfrey Digest; F 8:30-8:45 pm; |an 14; 

52 wks 
Amos & Andy; Sun 7:30-8 pm; (an 30; 7 wks 
Lorenzo Jones; M-F 5:15-5:30 pm; |an 3: 1955 


Miles California 


Ceoffrey Wade Adv, LA 


Don Lee 45 


season 
Newspaper of the Air; Sun-F Feb 1 ; 52 wks 


Miles California 


Ceoffrey Wade Adv, LA 


Don Lee 45 


Here's the Answer; M-F Feb 1; 52 wks 


Quaker Oats, Chi 


Sherman & Marquette, 
Chi 


NBC full net 


Hotel For Pets, M, W, F 5:30-5:45 pm; Jan 3; 
1955 season 




3. Broadcast Industry Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Harry Abbott 
Roger Allen 
William Andrews 
Ceorge W. Armstrong 
Leon Arons 
Lee Atwell 
Ezra Baker 
Kenneth H. Baker 
Lionel Baxter 

Noel C. Berault 
Robert C. Berry 
H. M. Bitner -Jr 
Stanely A. Bogan 
Dave Booher 
John M. Borghese 
Richard W. Brahm 
William B. Buschgen 
Leonard Bridge 
Roger C. Brown 
Howard Cann 
Richard L. Cass 
By Colvig 
Bill Cornish 
Dan Curtis 
|ohn F. Day 
William Dcmpsey 
Paul S. Dixon 
Robert M. Dooley 
Leon Drew 
John Eichhorn 
Paul Frank 
John Carficld 
Norman Cittleson 
Wm. Thomas Hamilton 
Bill Harms Jr 
Bob Hart 
Robert L. Harris 



KTVQ-TV, Oklahoma City, mgr 

WOTW, Nashua. NH, announcer 

KPTV, Portland, sis stf 

WHB. Kansas, mgr 

William Weintraub, NY, vp & dir of res 

WHBC, Canton. Ohio, s's dept 

International Motion Picture Studios, NY. dir of sis 

Standard Audit & Measurement Svcs. pres 

WSFA. WSFA-TV. Montgomery, Ala, vp & gen mgr 

WFAN, Providence, sis mgr 

WOTW, Nashua, NH. prog dir 

Crandwood Sdcstg, Cd Rapids 

The American Weekly, NY, acct exec 

WMBR. Jacksonville, sis mgr 

Amer Korean Found, NY, r-tv dir 

WMCA, NY. acct exec 

NBC Spot Sis, NY, radio acct exec 

C'andwood Bdcstg, Cd Rapids, controller 

CB^-Col of Texas, southern sis mgr 

MBS. NY. acct exec 

WBBM, Chi. radio sis stf 

KNXT, Hollywood, asst sis prom dir 

Edward Fctrv. Chi 

NBC Film, Chi, actg supvr 

Star-Ledger, Newark, asst mg ed 

KPIX. SF, educ dir 

KSL, Salt Lake City, natl spot sis mgr 

Blair-TV. NY, gen sis mgr 

KNXT, Hollywood, prod mgr 

KINC radio, Seattle, mgr 

WTVN, Columbus, newscaster 

WCAR. Ckve, sis mgr 

W|AR. Prov. gen mgr 

CBS, sis exec 

Edward Petry, Chi, tv rep 

KFEL-TV, Denver, comml mgr 

WIBC, Indianapolis, mc. dj 



NEW AFFILIATION 



KCEN-TV, Temple, Texas, mgr 

Same, prog dir 

Ziv Tv, northwest rep 

Same, vp & gen mgr 

TV bureau of Adv, NY, dir of res 

Same, prog dir 

Screen Cems. NY, comml sis stf 

Market Research, vp in chg media studies 

WBRC. Birmingham, Ala, sis mgr in chg of local & 

natl sis 
WPAW, Pawtucket, stf 
Same, stn mgr 
Same, pros 

CBS Radio Network Sis. acct exec 
Same, vd 

Magna Theatre Corp. r-tv dir 
Media-Mdsg. NY. pres 
NBC Spot Sis. Det, radio mgr 
Same, also dir 
Same, gen mgr 

CBS Radio Network Sis, acct exec 
Edward Petry, Chi, TV sis stf 
WXIX, Milwaukee, prom-publ dir 
Official Films, Chi. sis exec stf 
Same, sis mgr of Central sis force 
CBS. dir of news 
Same, prog mgr 

Same, exec asst in chg of corporate affairs 
CBS Radio Spot sis. sis development dept 
WXIX, Milwaukee, prog dir 
Same, asst to vp & gen mgr 
Same, asst to gen mgr 
WXFL. Clcve. sis stf 

WMUR-AM-TV, Manchester, NH, exec vp. gen mgr 
WNDU-TV, Notre Dame, sis mgr 
Avery-Knodcl, Chi, tv acct exec 
KLZ-TV. Denver, local sis mgr 
WTVN, Columbus, radio sis stf, acct exec 




In next issue: Neic and Reneiced on Television (Network) ; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes: 
Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



H. Weller 
Keever 13) 




Charlie 

Stone (3) 




Herbert W. 
Hobler (3) 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



21 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



IS/ew and, renew 







Arons (3) 




Dan E. 
Ries (3) 




Stanley 
Wilson (3) 




Shaun 
Murphy (3) 




Don H. 
McCannon (3) 




3. Broadcast Industry Executives (continued) 



NAME 



Louis Hausman 
Herb Heilbrun 
Ralph Hess Jr 
Herbert W. Hobler 
Fred Von Hofen 
Hub Hood 
isabell Hoyt 
Walter C. Johnson 

Robert S |ones 
Martin Katz 
H. Weller Keever 
George Kcnvon 
laon Carol King 
joseoh A. Kjar 
|ohn F. Klatt 

lames L. Knipe 
Cornelius Knox 
f-'avid N. Laux 
Harry LeBrun 
Terry Lee 
I con Levine 
Thorn's Loeb 
Roy Maner 
Dave Maxwell 
W. Barrett Mayer 
Donald H. McCollum 
Paul Mensing 
Don H. McCannon 

Shaun F. Murphy 
£1 Nagler 
Charles Newton 
Wilson H. Oelkers 
Cliffo-d Ogden 
Milt Olin 
Edw2rd C. Page 
lohn B. Poor 
C. Wesley Quinn 
Earl Reilly 
Dan E. Ries 
Harry Ripps 
William P. Robinson 
Frank B. Rogers 
Lee Savin 
Robert C. Scott 

William F. Schnaudt 
Willard Schroeder 
Mike Shapiro 
TheoHo'e F. Shaker 
Virgil Sharoe 
Austin B. Sholes 
loseph M. Sitrick 
Charlie Stone 
Robert H. Storz 
Todd Storz 
H. L. Sturtz 
Bill Swanson 
R. L. Swats Jr 
David A. Traylor 
Donald E. Tomkins 
lohn L. Vicmeister 
Leonard C. Warager 
R. W. Wasscnberg 
lay Watson 
lames P. Walker 
Robert Wechsler 
Franklin J. Weiner 
lames A. Wethington 
Ccorge Y. Wheeler II 
Wayne J. Wilcox 
Stanley Wilson 
Nadine Wright 
Ccorge E. Yonan 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



sec, asst gen mgr & 



CBS-Col, NY, vp 

WKRC, Cin. sis stf 

WDVA, Danville, Va, prom dir 

TelePromptcr Natl Sales, NY, gen sis mgr 

KINC-TV Seattle, acct exec 

WKRC, Cin, sis mgr 

KPOJ. Fortland, Or, mdsg mgr 

Travelers Bdcstg Service, Hartford, 

sis mgr of WTIC 
Sidney Carfield & Assoc, SF, radio-tv dir & acct exec 
WCAU-TV, Phila, sis stf 
NBC Film, Chi, Central sis supvr 
US Armv 

WRC. WRC-tV, Wash, DC. asst to adv prom mgr 
KSL. Salt Lake City, prog dir 
McCann-Erickson, Chi, media mgr 

C. E. Hooper, NY, exec vp & gen mgr 

NBC, NY, sis dept 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, acct exec 

WLM-T, Cm, asst stn mgr 

WFAA-TV, Dallas, asst mgr 

CBS, NY, dir of edu & public affairs progs 

NBC Business Unit, NY, prodr & mgr 

WSOC. Charlotte 

KB!C, Catalina, pub serv dir 

Mechanical Products, (ackson, Mich, regl mgr 

S-^we-in Research, dir of client rcl 

NBC Spot Sis, Det, mgr 

DuMont Tv Stations, gen mgr; also Labs, asst dir of 
bdcstg 

WFIE-TV, Evansville, Ind, sis mgr 

W|BK, Det, sports dir 

Darlington County asst Farm Agent 

Philco, Phila, gen purch agent 

NBC Film, Hollywood, supvr 

United Artists TV, NY 

George P. Holinberry, NY, tv acct exec 

General Tclcradio, NY, vp 

WTP.I-TV, Albany, sis rep 

KING Radio, Seattle, prog dir 

WKRC. Cm, asst prom dir 

Du Mont, NY, sis mgr 
WLW-A, iCrosley) Atlanta, pres 
Reeves Soundcraft Corp. NY, vp 
United Tv Prog ams, exec vp 

Du Mont, Cathode-iay Tube Div, Clifton, N|, asst sis 

mgr 
WHK, Cleve, acct exec 
Crandwood Bdcstg, Cd Rapids, gen mgr 
Avery Knodcl, Chi, tv rep 
CBS Tv Spots Sis, NY, acct exec 
KOWH. Omaha, mgr 
Presto Recording, NY, asst sis mgr 
Inte-natl Press Service, US Information Agcy, asst chf 
WMBR, Jacksonville, vp in chg sis 
Mid-Continent Bdcastg, pres 
Mid-Continent Bdcastg, vp & gen mgr 
Omaha World Herald, adv dept 
KTVX (r&TV), Tulsa, sis mgr 
NBC Radio Net, Chi, acct exec 
MBS, acct exec 

Grant Advertising, NY, radio-tv dir 
CBS Tv, NY, asst to budget dir 
NBC Film NY, sup 
KPIX. SF, prog mgr 
KPOA, Honolulu, asst mgr 
Tulsa Bdcstg, asst gen mgr 
Benton & Bowles, NY, acct exec 
WCBS-TV. NY, stf prom writer 
William G. Rambeau, NY, exec vp 
NBC, Wash, stf 

Good Housekeeping Mag, Det sis rep 
KFDA (r-tv), Amarillo. Tex, vp & gen mgr 
WDVA, Danville, Va, continuity writer 
MBS. sis mgr of co-op div for Midwest 



CBS. NY. corporate stf vp 

Same, sis mgr 

Same, acct exec 

Same, also vp 

KING, Seattle, mgr 

Same, gen mgr 

KVAN, Vancouver, Wash, mdsg mgr 

Same, also member of bd 

CBS R Net Sis. SF, acct exec 

Blair-TV. NY, dir of special sis 

Same, natl sis mgr 

W)BK. Det, Tv film dir 

Same, adv & prom mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Standard Rate & Data Service, Chi. rate-service medr 

rcl dir 
Same, pres & chmn of the bd 
CBS Radio Net Sis, NY, acct exec 
Studio Films, NY, vp 
WLW-A, Atlanta, gen mgr 
KOVR-TV, Stockton, vp & gen mgr 
Columbia University, dir of radio 6 tv activities 
Same. Tv Net Prog Div, mgr 
WIST, Charlotte, acct exec 
KBIF, Fresno, gen mgr 
WOND, Atlantic City. „atl sis rep 
Same, also vp 
NBC Spot Sis. Chi, r mgr 
Wsetinghouse Bdcstg, NY. vp & gen exec 

WTVP, Decatur. III. stn mgr 

Same, news & Sporls dir 

WBTW-TV, Florence, farm ed 

Same, vp in chg of purch 

Same, sis mgr of Western sis force 

Telefilm Enterprises, NY, sis stf 

Edward Petry. NY, sis stf 

Same, also MBS, exec vp 

WTRY, Troy, sis prom mgr 

KINC-TV, Seattle, acct exec 

WTVN, radio, Columbus, dir of prom & publ 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Croslcy Bdcstg, Cin, hd sis plans unit 

Same, exec vp 

Gross-Krause, exec vp & gen mgr 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Telefilm Enterprises. NY, sis stf 

Same, also vp 

WFAA-TV, Dallas, comml mgr 

WKIX. Milwaukee, gen sis mgr 

Same, vp & gen mgr 

Muzak, Recorded Tape Div, NY, dir of sis 

NARTB, Wash, pub & informational sves mgr 

WMBR-TV, lacksonville. vp 

Same, bd chmn 

Same, pres 

WOW-TV. Omaha, local sis stf 

Same, only TV sis 

Same, Det, mgr 

A. C. Nielsen, sis services exec 

own radio-tv consultant service 

WXIX, Milwaukee, bus mgr 

Same, sis mgr of Eastern sis force 

KTVU, Stockton, stn mgr 

KOVR. Stockton, asst mgr 

KTUL, Tulsa; KFPW, Ft Smith, Ark; in chg 

Screen Cems. NY, sis prom mgr 

WCBS-TV, NY, assi adv & sis prom mgr 

KONA (TV), Honolulu, sis mgr 

Radio Corp of Amer, stf vp 

CBS Radio Net Sis. Det, acct exec 

Texas State Net, Ft. Worth, asst gen mgr 

Same, prom dir 

Boiling Co, Chi, acct exec 



4. New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



Alsol Wax, Newark 

Amino Products Div, Intcrnatl Minerals & 

Chemical Corp, Chi 
Arizona Brewing, Phoenix 
Buitoni Foods, S. Hakcnsack, N) 
Cheramy, NY 

Chquot Club Co, Millis, Mass 
tbcrhard Faber Pencil Co, Bklyn 
Walt Framcr 

Frank Fthr Brewing, Louisville, Ky 
KDKD, Clinton, Miss 
KLEE, Ottumwa. Iowa 
National Brewing, Bait 
Northern Cal Chevrolet Dealers Assoc 
Proctor Electric. Phila 
Quality Radio Group, NY 
Revlon Products, NY 
Schneider Brewing, Trinidad, Col 
Sweet-Orr, NY 

Storer Bdcstg Co, W|W, Cleve 
WGVM, Creenville, Miss 
W. T. Young Food,, Lex, KY 



PRODUCT (or service) 



Wax 

Accent (protein derivative) 

A-l Pilsner Beer 

Macaroni 

April Showers toiletries 

Ginger ale, club soda 

Pencils, erasers, rubber bands 

Tv Productions 

Beer 

Radio Station 

Radio Station 

Beer 

Chevrolet cars 

Appliances 

Radio Stations 

Hair-Net Spray. Aquamarine Shampoo 

Beer 

Work Clothing 

Radio Station 

Radio Station 

Big Top Peanut Butter 



AGENCY 



Hal Tunis Assoc, 
Crant Adv, NY 



NY 



Erwin. Wasey, LA 

Albert Frank-Cuenther Law, NY 

Emil Mogul. NY 

Harold Cabot. Boston 

Anderson & Cairns. NY 

Ashlcy-Steiner, NY. LA 

Doolcy. Adv. Louisville. Ky 

Devney. NY 

Devney. NY 

W. B. Doner, Det 

Roy S. Durstine. SF 

Weiss & Celler. NY 

Dine & Kalmus, NY 

BBDO, NY 

limmy Fritz & Assoc, Hollywood 

Peck Adv. NY 

The Katz Agency, NY 

Devney, NY 

Rutledg? & Lilienfcld. St. Louis 



5. New Firms, New Offices, Changes of Address 



Lansburgh & Oldham, new adv agency, 123 El Pasco, Santa 
Barbara, Cal, Mark Lansburgh b Joyce Oldham Lansburgh 
heads 
Miller & Wallace Mackay, Seattle, merge to form Miller 
Mackay Hoeck & Hartung. 510 Virginia St, Seattle 



National Closed Circuit System. 595 Madison Ave. NY, 
formed; sis rep of DuMont's Closed Circuit Dept 

Rogers & Cowan, public relations, new offices at 17 E 
48th St. NY 



21 



SPONSOR 



If you want to sell 

Philadelphia 

housewives 





4- 



Let Scott Do It is the top-rated 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. 
show in Philadelphia . . . according to both Pulse 
and ARB . . . the greatest kitchen show in 
America. And Alan Scott's the consistent winner 
in popularity polls. 

SALESMAN FOR BLUE-CHIP SPONSORS! 
National Advertisers who've experienced Alan 
Scott's terrific selling power include: General 
Foods, Lipton's, Hoover Appliances, Morrell 
Meats, Pillsbury, St. Joseph's Aspirin, Sunshine 
Biscuits, Seabrook Frozen Foods, and many 
others. 

LOWEST COST! Alan Scott's Let Scott Do It 
has the lowest-cost-per-thousand rating of any 
daytime women's show in America's major 
markets, according to a study by Television Age 



Over 100,000 TV homes at a cost of only $1.45 
per thousand. And now, Let Scott Do It comes 
under WPTZ's "45-12" discount plan. 45% off 
one time rates when you buy 12 or more an- 
nouncements under the "45-12" plan. 

TOP COVERAGE! WPTZ is peak-powered at 
the low end of the band, to deliver a clearer, 
stronger signal to more people over a wider area 
than any other TV station in Pennsylvania! 

WHAT A BUY! Let Scott show you! And be 
sure to ask about the "45-12" plan. Write or 
wire your nearest Free & Peters "Colonel" — or 
phone Alexander W. Dannenbaum, Jr., WPTZ 
Sales Manager, LOcust 4-5500; or Eldon Camp- 
bell, WBC National Sales Manager, PLaza 
1-2700, New York. 



WPTZ CHANNEL 

First in Television in Philadelphia 




WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

WPTZ'KYW, Philadelphia . WBZ WBZA* WBZ-TV, Boston . KDKA«KDKA- 
TV, Pittsburgh; wo wo, Fort Wayne; KEX, Portland: KPIX, San Francisco 
KPIX represented by The Katz Agency, Inc. 
All other WBC stations represented by Free & PETERS, Inc. 



f 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



23 






"NBC's programming of spectaculars and general razzlc dazzle," writes John Crosby in the 
New York Herald Tribune, "has given television an important; and a sensi of i witemeni that 
it cannot afford to lose." 

The NBC Color Spectaculars have broken the rigid radio-mold of unvarying strips of half- 
hour shows. They have forced wider horizons, new programming concepts . . . they draw into 
television great stars, writers, directors from all over the world. In addition they have given 
Color Television tremendous impetus by providing regular and impressive color programming. 

The special ingredient that has given all television its great expansion and excitement has 
been the NBC Color Spectaculars. And the audience response has been unmistakable. 




Since the new season began in September, Nielsen ratings* show 




Mori than 11 million familit s watching tin avt rage Spectacular -- almost 
tin audience of the averaye evening network program. 

Seven Spectaculars with Top Ten-sized audiences during the six rating periods. 

Store homes tuned to NBC - an average of 649,000 more homes than the 
second network, with its average nighttime program. 

In every rating period, more Top Ten shoivs from NBC than any othi i m tivork. 

NBC's program leadership has made it a most exciting year for the 
television audience. And a most profitable year for advertisers. 



exciting things are happening on 




TELEVISION 



a service of 



•Nielsen second September Report- first December Report 195-1. All data verified by A. C. Nielsen Co. 



In Milwaukee 
Coffeehead Larsen 
Spins the Platter 
And the 
Pulse Goes Up 
WEMP 

Milwaukee's Second 
Station 




Of seven Milwaukee radio stations, 
WEMP now scores No. 2. 

Milwaukee's best radio buy, WEMP 
offers more audience per dollar 
than any other station. 

WEMP audiences are growing bigger 
year by year. Latest Pulse ratings 
show a 20 per cent increase for 
Coffeehead Larsen at 6:00 to 10:00 
A.M. All other WEMP segments 
show a proportionate increase. 

Get the facts on Milwaukee's only 
24-hour Music, News, Sports sta- 
tion — Milwaukee's best radio buy. 

CALL HEADLEY-REED 



WEMPWEMPFM 

MILWAUKEE 



HUGH IOICE. JR., Gen. Mgr. 
HEADLEY-REED, Natl. Rtp. 

HOURS OP MUSIC. NEWS, SPORTS 




JERRY PICKMAN (R.) CHATS WITH BING CROSBY ON STUDIO SET 

Ji'rome Piehman 



idpnir 



V.p., Dir. nat'l adv., pub. & exploitation 
Paramount Pictures Corp., New York 



Jem Pickman directs Paramount advertising from a dark-pan- 
eled office in a tall building overlooking Time- Square - that is. 
when he isn't at the studio in Hollywood, at a San Francisco pre- 
view or at a New York opening. 

Paramount got into tv back in 1950, when most film studios still 
considered the medium a sort of plague that might go awa) il the) 
only ignored it. Pickman likes tv. He feels it's an advertising me- 
dium made to order for selling movies. 

"I'm an instinctive showman," he told SPONSOR, drawing lis knees 
to his chest for comfort. He- a \oungish 38: dark hair, dark horn- 
rimmed glasses, shirtsleeves, tie-less, with a rapid-fire deliver) of 
movie jargon. 

"Our product can't be sold through fane) packaging," said he. 
"If we're gonna sell a movie, we've gotta have a name. I hat - why 
the studio consults us about story, production and cast. II the) 
wanna sell me m\ sister, I'd say, 'No. She wont sell. I ve gotta 
mother and grandmother who act. But I cant sell 'em. Kell\. I 
can sell. . . ." (He is currently working on Country Girl, in which 
Grace Kelly stars.) 

Radio and l\ movie advertising, Pickman explained, generall) 
come into pla\ for about three to 10 days when the new film open-. 

"We call it 'merchandising a motion picture'," he said. "'What 
we're doing is conditioning peopli — building the want-to-see. Where 
there's a definite plus, we localize an ad. Like. sa\ Hryce Canyon 
appears in a Western so. we tell 'em in I lah to go look for shots 
of their own scenery. Each movie'.- handled differently. Sometimes 
we don I work for a week, then we don't see daylight for 72 hours 
in a row because there's a rush job." 

Ilie rapid pace comes naturall) to Pickman. who »a- once de- 
scribed 1>\ the employees of the Brooklyn Eagle as the "youngest 
newspaperman on si\ continents'' a title he earned l>\ starting to 
u<>i k a> a cop) bo) .il age nine. 

Pickman has also learned to relax upon rare occasions. \ pic- 
ture in his desk drawer shows him sound asleep in a terrace ham- 
mock at "Dottie's home in Balboa . . . that's Dorotln I. amour, of 



i miii -e. 



• * • 



26 



SPONSOR 




MEREDITH 
STATIONS 



KANSAS CITY: KCMO Radio & KCMO-TV 
SYRACUSE: WHEN Radio & WHEN -TV ,, ,„, *,„,, 
PHOENIX: KPHO Radio & KPHO-TV 
OMAHA: WOW Radio & WOW-TV 

i,h BetterHomes ^ Farming 



Affiliated Wit 



The Katz Agency 

John Blair & Co. 
and Blair-TV 



Magazines 



and Gardens 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



27 



Cat Sales 
Sez. 




D 

N 
'T 

K 

I 
D 

Y 
O 
U 
R 
S 
E 
t 
F 



YOU can't cover 
California unless you 
u$e KSBW-TV, Channel 8, 
Salinas-Monterey, California. 

The rich central coast of Califor- 
nia is covered exclusively by 
KSBW-TV, 422,709 TV sets, of 
which over 90,000 are undupli- 
cated. 

Consumer Income in KSBW-TV's 
Basic Market (which does not in- 
clude all the unduplicated cover- 
age) i$ equal to Phoenix, Ariz., 
PLUS Camden, N. J. 

Ask Hollingberry. 






CBS, NBC, ABC, DuMONT 



28 



by Joe Csida 

Film: television's "new business" tlept. 

At the beginning of the tall season we dimmed the lights 
in the seance room at our headquarters, gazed deep and long 
into our tv film crystal hall and did a Backstage of comment, 
observation and prediction concerning programing. On and 
off for the past several week-; we have again been locked up 
with the eerie blue and green light- and the spirit voices, but 
this time we used our special tv film business crystal globule. 

Appeared therein, of course, the faces of friend- who are 
practitioners on the producing, selling and merchandising 
side of the business, like Don Kearney of ABC Film Syndi- 
cation Sales, Phil Williams of Ziv, Walter Schuimmer and 
numerous others. And their voices were the spirit voice-. 
According to the Backstage ball, this i> how the hti-inc— -ide 
of the tv film industry shapes up: 

Competition has reached its keened, most dog-eat-dog 
point. Never since the first vidfilm was tossed on the market 
has there been as much product offered for lease by as main 
people via as multitudinous a number of deals as is the case 
today. And this competition i- likely to reach even greater 
degrees of canine devouring brother canine. 

'Way up at the top of the heap a struggle of recently de- 
veloped titans i- taking place. Strangely enough (or perhaps 
not too strangely) the powerful network- ( NBC, CBS. ABC) 
are not among the titans in this area of industry operations. 
For while all three of the tv webs (and particularly the first 
two named) have solid tv film operations with good product 
and capable sales and mrechandising Forces, the gargantua 
are. of course, Zi\ TV and MCA TV. MCA\ purchase of 
United Telex ision Productions gave it the largest and mo-t 
imposing collection of product in the field. And Ziv's accel- 
erated and big-time production as represented 1 \ its Eddie 
('alitor series make- it either the reigning champ or the 
number one challenger. 

Parenthetically, in the gradual evolution brought to -how 
business and the advertising business b) television generally, 
and tv films specifically, another noteworthy development 
might be mentioned here. In the looking field MCA'- major 
competitor, of course, i- the \\ illiam Morris Vgency. And 
while MCA lias chosen to enter the l\ film production and 
distribution business in a vasl and superlatively aggressive 
manner, the Morris agencv lias steered clear oi l\ film pro- 
duction and distribution for the most part. The Morris 
i Please turn to page 9 1 I 

Also see I'ifm section this issue png<» 17 



- S 



Tex & Jinx 1:00-2:00 p. m. 

11:20 p. m.-12 :30 a. m. 

Monday through Friday 



selling* by the stars • • on WRC-A. 



When you're navigating your product through 
competitive waters in America's No. 1 market, you'd 
do well to let wrca's program-personalities help 
set your course. 

TEX & JINX for instance. The glamor of their per- 
sonalities, the interest and excitement of their two 



daily radio programs, and the warmth and sincerity 
with which they describe their sponsors' products — 
all combine to make them star-salesmen for a wide 
range of contented advertisers. The selling power 
of TEX & JINX keeps winning them enthusiastic tes- 
timonials like these: 



Coffee - "How we feel about 
Tex & Jinx for Savarin is best 
told by the fact that we are 
their oldest sponsor. We are 
now on their program five 
nights a week in the 8th year 
of a very happy association." 

S. A Schonbrunn 

President 

S. A. Schonbrunn & Co., Inc. 

Maker* of Savarin Coffee 



Beauty Aids - "Tex & Jinx 
introduced our new home hair 
stylist school with so much en- 
thusiasm that we are signing 
up new students daily. We are 
especially pleased to have 
reached such a large audience 
of career girls. We certainly 
look forward to continuing." 
Victor Vito 
President 
Victor Vito, Inc. 



If your aim is to sell more of your product, faster, 
in the New York market — try selling by the stars 
on WRCA. Stars like Tex & Jinx. Stars with docu- 
mented records of sales successes. Come aboard ! 

Call George Stevens, Circle 7-8300 in New York. 
Or your nearest NBC Spot Sales office. 



Movies -"Tex & Jinx are 
without question two of the 
finest radio boosters of motion 
pictures in the New York area. 
Their approach is sincere and 
direct ; and their loyal audience 
has learned thataTex-and-Jinx 
endorsement of a film puts that 
film on their 'must see' list..." 

Charles Einfeld 

Vice-President 

20th Century-Fox 



Beverages-"Tex&Jinx were 
extremely helpful in making 
No-Cal New York City's top- 
selling dietetic beverage. Their 
convincing delivery and believ- 
able commercials did much to 
help attain this goal. We have 
just increased our frequency 
schedule with Tex & Jinx for 
1955. Morris Kirsch 

President 
S'o-Cal Beverage Corp. 



1 

l 

I 



WRCA-660 | 

Radio in New York ^ 



i 



Jj3 



a service of 



REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES 



* + * 




doodcbDjSd: 




CWl)4latfat4. — 




JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



WBTV-WBTW combination creates 
market comparable to nation's 8th largest 
in the industry-mushrooming Carolinas 



Advertisers have a rich 
stake in what's happening 
in the Carolinas. 

The Carolinas are on the 
march economically, and two 
top-power stations — WBTV 
and WBTW — now service this 
upsurging selling market. 

WBTV and newcomer 
WBTW can, as a 
combination, deliver 50% 
of the people in North 
and South Carolina. 

Together, WBTV and WBTW 
create a market of 3,375,000 
people, over $3V2 billion 
in buying power and 
$2V2 billion in retail sales — 
a TV market comparable 
to the eighth largest 
in the nation. 

For complete details on how 
WBTV and WBTW truly 
measure up to "Dominance 
doubled in the Carolinas," 
call CBS Television 
Spot Sales. 



30 



SPONSOR 




MARKET: 100-mil< 

around ( ; rei n Bay, W Lsc. 

media USED: only television 
PAST ADVERTISING: almost 

i n area 

SUCCESS YARDSTICK: sales, 

incri iased distribul ion 

BUDGET: $12,500 

DURATION: six months 

SCHEDULE: six minute 
a nnour.ci ment s weekly 



Blow-by-blow story of a tv test 

SPONSOR will report sales results of B&M eampaign as they eonie in during 

six-month effort to see if sales ean Ise upped using tv only 

by Miles David 

J%. dream became reality for sponsor late last month. 

For the first lime in television and tradepaper history a test campaign began 
which sponsor will report to readers as the results happen. 

Traditionally test campaigns are top secret, seldom revealed even years alter the 
fact. But ever since SPONSOR started publishing eight years ago it has sought a chance 
to bring its readers the blow-by-blow story while a campaign was in progress. 

The opportunity came when the Burnham & Morrill Co. of Portland, Maine, 
agreed to give sponsor exclusive semi-monthly reports on sales during a six-month 
tv test. (Agency is BBDO, Boston.) 

The campaign began 24 January in a single Midwestern market. The products 
are B&M oven-baked beans and B&M brown bread. The objective: to see what tele- 
vision can do to pep up a relatively low-volume market. 

B&M beans has high distribution in the area but sales volume is small relative 
to New' England, home of the oven-baked bean. B&M brown bread ha- low distribu- 
tion, only a trickle of sales. (Total wholesale sales in area: $54,000.) 

Prior to the campaign both products had virtually no advertising in the test 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



31 



SALES 

WILL BE 

THE SUCCESS 

YARDSTICK 

Figures at right show monthly 

wholesale sales oj B& 1/ beans 

and brown bread in first half 

L954. sponsor will carry 1955 

sales as the) conic in ovei 

six-month period, i Test 

bt gan 2 1 January . I Figures 

for '55 will be curried side- 

l,\ -side uiili '5 1 to give 

reudci the Ik>.\ score at » glam e. 

Note how poorly brown bread 

did in 51 and how sales 

are strongei in irea I. 

■ loser to the majot city 

in the region, Green Bay 




First six months 1954 sales of two 

sizes of B&M beans and one size of 

brown bread <by dozens of cans) 



January' 

18 02. 27 <K. Bread 



1st half Feb. 2nd So 

18 oz. 27 oj. Bread 18 oz. 27 



I If I I 1 (50-ni ile vittiius (irouitcf Green Buy) 

1. MANITOWOC, WIS 

2. OSHKOSH, WIS. 

3. APPLETON, WIS. 

4. CILLETT, WIS. 

5. CREEN BAY, WIS. 

6. MENOMINEE, MICH. 



60 


30 




50 


2:> 




50 


25 




50 


10 




100 


40 


50 


100 


65 


70 










inn 


7(1 




110 


Tii 




L60 


60 


2n 


50 




20 


50 














AREA A 



20 



100 
230 



Wtfvl B (50- I 00-ni if e radius annual f*r<»c»n Bay) 



7. FOND DU LAC, WIS. 

8. STEVENS POINT, WIS. 

9. WAUSAU, WIS. 

10. NORWAY, MICH. 

11. SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 

12. WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WIS. 

.i;inu;ii\ nol divided to show half-month figures. 
res) did not begin until 2! January 1 



30 


25 






i.ii 


10 


70 


40 


40 


5 


50 




7ii 


75 







Hi 


30 


20 


25 


31 1 


10 


30 


10 



.111 



2d 



in 



ARK A B M\->1>V 







PART ONE 



OF A SERIES 



market, with the exception of sporadic 
mentions within multi-product news- 
paper .id- b) local stores. 

I In- whole burden of the test is car- 
ried l>\ television. \n\ rise in sales 
will be attributable to i\. since no othei 
new form of advertising will he used 
l"i the duration of the test and no 
other new factors have been intro- 
duced. 

\s admen pointed mil w hile sI'onsou 
was researching the Mi-Media Study, 
ii - usuall) impossible lor the national 
advertise] i" correlate -ale- with ad- 
vertising in an) one medium. Hut fo] 
B&M and the readers ol sponsor the 
rare opportunit) is at hand. 

Years »i planning: The B&M test 
campaign will las) -i\ months. Bui ii 

look o\ ei two and a hall \ ears to work 

out all the details ol the test in-a-gold- 

flsh how I. 



Back in the spring of L952 just af- 
ter the N \KTP> convention, sponsor 
Editor-Publisher Norman H. Glenn 
and Havdn Evans, general manager of 
\\ B U -TV, Green Bay, Wis., met at 
the del (.oionado Hotel in San Die-o 
for breakfast. Over their second cup 
of eolfee. Glenn confided sponsor's 

long-held ambition to cover a cam- 
paign as it happened. 

Haydn Evans listened enthusiasti- 
cally. \nd. within a few months he 
was on the long-distance telephone re- 
porting thai he had an advertise] 
primed to cooperate in a SPONSOR-re- 
ported campaign. In the final plan- 
ning, however, llie advertiser in ques- 
tion decided io remain anon) mous and 
to carefull) shield his sales figures. \ 
series ol blow-by-blow article- became 
impossible. Nonetheless a tesl cam- 
paign was undertaken, designed to 
measure a television station's /one of 
influence. ' See "How fai oul does a 
u station sell" sponsor 3 Ma\ I 1 ).") I. 
page 39. Results "I this tesl are <o\ - 
ered later in l his repoi 1. 1 

Ii was nol until I la\ dn I \ ans sold 



\\ . G. Northgraves. advertising man- 
ager of Burnham \ Morrill, on a com- 
pletely open t\ test thai the present 
series of articles could be undertaken. 
B&M agreed to furnish SPONSOR with 
il- -ales figures for Green Bay and the 
area within a 1 (10-mile radius — on an 
exclusive basis. The month-by-month 
figures for the first sJn month- of 1054 
appear in the < hart above. Figures for 
L955 will be published in succeeding 
issues ol sponsor as the) are tabulated 
hv B&M's broker in the territory, the 

( IttO L. kuehn ( o. of Milwaukee. 

Figures for the comparable period 
during 1954 will always be carried 

side h\ side wilh 1055 -ales Io -how 

the reader i\ results al a glance. 

W hile no sale- figures had been tab- 
ulated at presstime, Walter L. Kuehn, 
president ol the Kuehn brokerage linn. 
told sponsor sales foi Januarj 1055 
. ppeared i" be up. Vmong the rea- 
sons in his opinion: anticipation oi the 
i\ i .imp. nun b) the gi oeei \ trade. 

Sales figures will be reported to 

SPONSOR from two /one-: \rea \. coii- 

Please turn /<> page L09) 



32 



SPONSOR 



, March 2nd halt March 

Bread 18 02. 27 02. Bread 



1st half April 
I802. 27 oz. Bread 



2nd half April 
18 i)i 27 »2. Bread 



7 st half May 

18 02. 27 02. Bread 



2nd half May 

18 '>2. 27 02 Bread 



1st halt June 

18 02. 27 02. Bread 



2nd half June 
18 02. 27 02. Bread 



20 15 



loo 



10 



120 70 70 



i:. 

mi r> 

100 L35 



20 250 145 
70 .... 



50 25 

51 1 ! ( I 
230 L50 120 65 



21 1 15 
70 35 
20 85 



51 • 20 

LS Beans, both sizes: G.52I dozen. Brawn breath lliUt dozen 



2") 

on 
30 35 60 80 7.1 

in i5ii io 
')ii 235 20 280 185 



30 30 10 



20 



50 

50 75 

40 30 



50 

50 30 

30 35 

50 20 



70 35 



70 100 



30 10 30 10 

[LS Beans, both sizes. 3.001 dozen. Brou-n bread: tliii dozen 







2.". 






.... 


50 












90 


60 





70 


90 


20 


70 












LOO 


30 





. 









20 


70 




20 


40 


30 


75 


55 


20 


20 


10 














30 


10 




WBAY-TV WHIPPED UP INTEREST IN TV TEST WITH MEETING FOR GROCERY TRADE. POINTING TO TEST AREA IS HAYDN EVANS 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



33 




Kssii: 19 years of radio news 

Despite entry into t\ . Esso lias inereasecl spot radio news budget. 
It's now spending about 81 million for newseasts over 52 stations 



2w earl) two decades ago Esso Stand- 
ard Oil < o. began .1 spol radio cam- 
paign consisting of five-minute news- 
casts. The campaign is still going. 
And it's still growing. 

In an era which has found many 
spot radio users diverting some of 
their radio budgets into television or 
other media, Esso continues to add ra- 
dio markets to its news schedule. From 
an original list of 13 stations in 1935, 
I sso has expanded ) our Esso Reporter 
newscasts to 52 stations, each of which 
airs the Reporter an average ol three 
times a <la\. sponsor estimates thai 



Esso currentl) spends more than SI 
million annuall) on the Esso Report- 
er for radio. \nd this doesn't include 
extra spot radio campaigns — like one 
now being carried on nearly 300 sta- 
tions plus the 52 Reporter outlets. 

Esso experimented with news on tv 
15 years ago. now sponsors a tv \er- 
sion of the Esso Reporter on 16 sta- 
tions and weather reports on two oth- 
ers. SPONSOR estimates the annual spot 
tv budget at about $1.25 million. Bulk 
of t\ money is new money — not di- 
verted from radio. I In a future is- 
sue SPONSOR will tell the storv of Es- 



so's spot tv news approach and the 
lc---ons it has learned in translating its 
traditional radio fare into the visual 
medium. 1 

Esso actively encourages its dealers 
in smaller markets to use radio. It 
-end- spe< ial kits to radio stations ol 
less than 1 kw. tells the radio outlets 
how to gel business from service sta- 
tion operator-. I.s-o doe-n t pax a 
nickel toward the time these indepen- 
dent service station operators purchase 
on local radio outlets, yet about 400 
Esso gasoline dealers currently have 
schedules on more than 300 radio -ta- 



MAP SHOWS ESSO'S 18-STATE MARKETING AREA, LISTS 52 RADIO STATIONS AIRING AVERAGE OF THREE SHOWS DAILY 




JWGUTI Bangor 
^WGAN] Portland 

WBZA| Springfield 

W8Z I BoJlon 

WPRO] Provident* 
. d,W0RCl Horttord 

^WQRWCBSl New York 
- 1 KYW I Philadelphia 

WHP I Homsbvrg 
\ WDEL I Wilminglon 
iWFBRl Baltimore 

WRC 1 Woihrngton 
I WBOCl Salary 

WRVAl Richmond 

WTARl Norfolk 
\ WBIG I Greemboro 
IWPTfl Roi.ioh 

' \ WSJS] Winiton Solom 

WMFP| Wilmington 

I WBT I Chorlotte 

^WWNC] **«««• 

WSP*| Spartanburg 

WIS I Columb.o 

WCSC| Chorlejton 

WFBCj Greenville 



tions throughout 18 states. 

For nearly 20 years Esso has had 
<ml\ one regular radio formula: new-. 
Your Esso Reporter is the name given 
Esso-sponsored newscasts on all 52 
radio and 18 tv stations. But the pro- 
grams are locally produced. All Esso 
does is supply its stations with stand- 
ard openings and closing and new com- 
mercials. It maintains close touch w ith 
over-all operation, however. A liai- 
son man from Esso's radio-ti agency, 
Marschalk & Pratt Division of M< - 
Cann-Erickson, New York, visits sta- 
tions regularK. Hut neither Esso e\c< - 
utives nor the liaison man attempt to 
tell the stations how the news should 
be selected or edited. 

The Esso Reporter delivers substan- 
tial audiences. Nielsen ratings indi- 
cate the radio version is heard in 
34.2 r < of all radio homes in Esso's 18- 
state marketing area an average of >.!'» 



case history 



times per month. That's a monthly 
average of 6,323,000 homes hearing 
l lie Reporter for a total of about 37 
million times. I Details later on how 
Esso is able to use national Nielsen 
ratings to determine its total local au- 
dience.) 

Over the years Esso and Marschalk 
& Pratt have perfected their use of spot 
radio until today, the wa\ they prac- 
tice it. it's in about the same class as 
fine art. Not only does Esso get full 
horsepower from the news broadcasts 
themselves, but also the company gets 
more mileage through promotion given 
to Esso and the Reporter 1>\ stations. 

tl'fi i/ spot? Esso's primary reason 
for using spot radio is its distribution 
area. Esso — a wholly-owned marketing 
subsidiary of Standard Oil Co. I New 
{Please turn to page 104 I 



ll«»n stations promote 'Keporti'r' 



If hen new Esso station opened in Portland. 
Me., WCAN 'Esso Reporter 1 covered event 

II RCA, New York, gives show plug on its 
big Times Square spectacular moving sign 

WNOX. Knoxville, broadcasts 'Reporter 
from booth at Tennessee Valley A&l Fair 

24-sheet posters are used by some stations 
(.like WSJS, Winston-Salem) in promotion 

WW'L, New Orleans, uses posters on outside 
of street cars to plug time show is on 



► 






WSJ 


jj^ RADIO 




WH£MYOt/'UH£AR 

NBC 

AMI LI ATI 


ESSO 

NEWS REPORTER 

4 TIMES DAILY 











MM 






PART TWO 



OF A TWO-PART SERIES 



TOT AGENTS: wha 



keep away from star names, concentrate on ideas j 



Wv i tli a few advertisers already 
getting out their shovels to pay net- 
work t\ stars next season, admen are 
casting about desperatel) for answers 
to the dual problem of rising tv talent 
costs and meagre prospects for sub- 
stantial audience increases. 

There is, admittedly, no easy solu- 
tion. But there is a strong feeling that 
something must he done about talent 
agents calling the tune while adver- 
tisers pa) the piper. I See "Talent 
igents: have they won control over tv 
costs?" in the previous issue.) A num- 
ber "I ageuc\ men told SPONSOR that 
the) welcomed its efforts to focus on 
i workable solution. 

The ad agencies are particularly 
frustrated while the) contemplate, ovei 
the long term, the gradual slippage ol 
program control from their ringers as 
the magazine formal comes to domi- 
nate the network tv picture. Though 
there i- a definite fear that the monop- 
•il\ of star talent by the William Morris 
^genc) ami Music Corporation of 
America is helping to drive star prices 
out of line, there is also strong resent- 
ment directed at the networks. 

l'he resentment is twofold. On tin- 
one hand, say admen, networks are 
bidding up talent costs and concen- 
trating on battling the competition 
rather than pav ing attention to sooth- 
ing the advertiser's headaches. On the 
other hand, the control over time slots 
and programing by the networks is 
limiting the advertiser's ability to con- 
trol program costs. 



by lien Bodec and Alfred J. Jaffe 

Nevertheless, admen feel it is possible 
I" moderate the obvious excesses of the 
rat race which always seems to accom- 
pan) the star svstem. 

I- The most common piece of advice 
offered was: keep away from stars if 
you possibly can. Said one agency 
radio-tv department chief: 

'"Main advertisers would be better 
off if they concentrated on shows built 
on ideas rather than names. On a 



Are tv costs out of line? 

Despite liigli prices paid for 
"marquee names" their cost-per- 
1.000 is low because of big audi- 
ences. Average cosl ol general 
variei) shows in October was 
$2.93-per-l,000 homes per com- 
mercial minute, according to 
Nielsen data. This was lowest of 
all program types on net video. 
General drama averages $3.68 



-how with ideas names arc expendable 
and very often not necessan. You may 
not get the biggest audiences in the 
world but are 20 rating points worth 
$5 million? J don't think so. You 
don't even need people on your show. 
What about dogs? I'm not kidding. I 
understand one of the two dog shows 
has been coming in at little over >2- 
per- l.OOl I homes per commercial min- 
ute. And that compares with the best." 



\ number of agency men specificall) 
urged the use of more drama show-. 
Said one: 

"One of the greatest accomplish- 
ments of tv has been it- drama shows. 
especially the hour-long ones. It's no 
accident that most of them have been 
running a long time. And they do \er\ 
well without stars." 

Another agency man. speaking of 
dramatic shows, said : 

"One thing I like about dramatic 
shows is that they're flexible. You're 
not -link with a comedv star whose 
material ma\ not be panning out or 
who s gradually being devoured b\ 
frequency. Each dramatic show gives 
you a fresh opportunit) to attract a 
loval audience. Of course, you have 
to keep up quality. But \ou"re not 
-tuck with one theme or one person. 
You can do comedy, satire, romance, 
mystery, practical!) anything." 

The non-star shows commonly cited 
as examples of the direction in which 
advertisers can move are NBC's Kraft 
Tv Theatre: the two Edward R. Mur- 
row shows on CBS. Person to Person 
and See It Now; CBS' What's My 
Line: NBC's Mr. Peepers. While it was 
acknowledged that well-known names 
are connected with some of these 
shows, it was pointed out that the) 
are not high-priced names. 

-. \d\erlisers. ad agencies and net- 
works were urged to keep a sharper 
eye out for promising new talent and 
be willing to invest in a long-term de- 
velopment of such talent. A lot of ad- 



'itiM'/iiiMf ion is best alternative to buying high-priced stars, say }l<tre intensive SVOtltina of night clubs (where Danny ThdB 
admen, who cite Ed Murrow's "Person to Person," "See It Now" as examples developed), other sources is urged to avoid reliance on a few big run 





p alternative to paying their price :' 



I", admen advise. But there's a eateli: "If one pays, everybody pays 



2" 





Controlling 
factor in at 
least 19 name shows* 




"* J! "v 



*A chart on talent agents in previous issue 
showed that JVM and MCA are controlling 
factors in 38 out of 57 big name shows 






Controlling 

/actor in at 

least 19 name shows* 



\ • a 

T 



>y 



^ % : 






9iii>. 



'* 



II 



men feel that there is a shortage of 
top names on tv and that this shortage 
tends to raise the level of all talent 
prices asked by agents. 

Most opinions laid the burden of 
scouting and signing new talent on the 
shoulders of the networks. This atti- 
tude, common among the ad agencies, 
exists with the realization that it will 
do nothing to regain for the agencies 
the kind of programing control they 
had in radio. However, a typical com- 
ment explaining the seeming contra- 
diction was: "The networks have 
helped create this upward cost spiral; 
let them do something to push it down 



again in the future." 

The emphasis on new talent also 
carried over into new program ideas. 
Interest was expressed in the methods 
used by NBC's Pacific division in 
building new shows. What caught the 
eye of admen particularly was the 
opinion expressed bv Frank Cleaver, 
the division's program director, that 
the common procedure of picking a 
star and then building a program 
around him should be ended in tv. 

The Cleaver method, taken from the 
movies, where he once worked, is essen- 
tially a svstem of developing shows bv 
stages. It avoids the alternatives of 



turning down an idea cold or laying 
out $30,000 or more for a pilot film. 
It starts out with a writer getting paid 
for an idea, additional pav for a first 
draft of the program and further pav- 
ment for revisions, if necessary. Onlv 
when this point is reached are audi- 
tions held for talent. 

Because of the economy of this 
method, the division now has more 
than 40 "programs" in various stages 
of development. If everv idea accepted 
under the either-or method was made 
into a pilot only 10 to 15 new program 
ideas could be undertaken, according 
(Please turn to page 107) 



me in agency-produced shows (SSCB's "City Hospi- 
as casualty) is limiting power to control costs, agency men say 



Panel shows, such as "What's My Line," prove to admen that a popular 
show doesn't have to cost a lot of money. Show is one of cheapest on air 





MjBirdnqijrn. Electric Shaierc 



^wHraii?^ 



....... ><»* V ° rh 



X *■ * 

v x x x * 

TO: % x * 

v X X 

F KOU: % x * 

15 I 955 
Janus?* ^ b ' 



R° M: r day* 

7 Tio Y°* rea v x** * udg6t late-eveninB. '* ann ounce*ei 




KB*- 



Spot radxo rec 



ffJt£^££~ ^« --".15 iTSSS" 

1 - ^^ — ^ments. r re acn nou oar* 6 ] _ „ 

announcem nS t0 „ ceI „ents a « ee \* 13 < 

and partxcxP ^ jounce* ^ ^an ^ 




" nT v our *»>»"- , QPW ives a»« J t 

5 parUciP— announcers ^^ tnan 

„. no loss t»», y6 ars ago- lurn _„ver on 

°° „ir to got full WP . atriW1 U0O ar6S - S homes 1» 

*« 3l .... entire "s"^ radio-onlV ^ in 



on 



„ get f" 11 lOP ., w u.n area, « in 

„. Co.er VO-^-^-o^-^eS ^ - t 

WarkSi^. ° „ centers. x Chicago anu . tta cned i s 
^T^a^as *. -«£« ffl a r - »\. ca.palsn 
r-a o, -f - -U ,or vour - 

of 65 markets _ 




ABOVE MEMO, FROM ONE OF TOP 20 RADIO-TV AGENCIES, IS NOW BEFORE CLIENT; RADIO RECOMMENDATION SHOWS TREND 

Spot radio: off to fast '.15 start 

A SPONSOR survey of reps, 25 radio-tv agencies reveals upsurge 
in spot radio buying, rcevaluations of buying strategy 



J. he memo above maj be a sign of 
the times in spot radio. Its a faithful 
though carefull) shielded version of a 
rei ommendation one of the top 20 
air agencies made to .1 client. The 
ag( n< \ urges the advertiser to come 
back to spot radio heavil) after a 
two-year hiatus. 

\ SPONSOR survej indicates dozens 
oi similai recommendations are circu- 
lating today. Ii all adds up to a re- 
surgence in spot radio interesl with 
more account activitj during the first 
few week- of L955 than in the compar- 



38 



able period around the start of '54. 
I he memo above is in tune with 
thinking toda) for other reasons. It 
|n oposes: 

• \ schedule -plead n\er both da\ 
and night. 

• A higher frequencj than the ac- 
count ever used in past spot radio 
< ampaigns. 

• A campaign of at leasl 13 weeks' 
duration. 

• I'se of major t\ markets which the 
aCCOUnl had tended to exclude in some 

past spot radio campaigning. 



It's apparent as you talk to the buy- 
ers and sellers of spot radio toda\ that 
this is the pattern which has begun to 
develop for dozens of accounts, spon- 
sor spoke to buyers in 25 agencies 
and most oi the leading reps in this 
latesl survej of the spot radio scene. 
I See report last issue. 24 January, on 
selling method- in use this year: "Big 
1955 push for spot radio."' page 38.) 

Not all the 25 agencies sur\e\ed 
e\ inced increased interest in spot ra- 
dio. Nor did all the reps queried feel 
that valid forecasts could \et he made 

SPONSOR 



for a big 1955. 

"Still too early to draw conclu- 
sions," said one rep, "we've still got a 
tough fight." 

"You can't <<>uiii December. It s not 
a typical month," said Y&R's Frank 
Coulter, hut he added. "I think spot 
radio will have a big L955. Tv costs 
have gotten to the point where an ad- 
vertiser must either sacrifice frequency 
or reevaluate radio." 

A sufficient number of clients have 
gone on the air during the past leu 
weeks with now and different spot ra- 
dio campaigns to indicate that spot 
radio is being reevaluated. Brief!) . 
here are some significant characteris- 
tics of 1955 spot radio buys to date: 

1« There's the return to long-range 
radio buying. "More advertisers have 
come to recognize that the medium 
must be used steadily," comments Rob- 
ert E. Eastman. John Blair & Co. v.p. 

Among clients buying on a 52-week 
basis is Vaseline Hair Tonic (through 
McCann-Erickson ) . This advertiser 
began using spot radio in Januan 
1954, dropped magazines in order to 
go into the air media. This Januar\ 



status report 



llic firm again bought spot radio on a 
long-range basis ami with an increased 
budget. 

Atlantic Refining and the Insurance 
Co. of North America I both through 
N. W. Ayer) bought spot radio sched- 
ules for 1955 on a 52-week basis. Says 
Bill Croasdale, Ayer timebuyer: 
"There's no appreciable change this 
year, except that we're adding mar- 
kets to our 1954 list, and we're bu\ing 
on a more long-range basis this year." 

2. More advertisers are bin mil high- 
er frequencv schedules than ever be- 
fore. "They have found that spot ra- 
dio makes frequent daily advertising 
exposure economically possible on a 
long-range as well as short-range ba- 
sis," says Jack Hardingham. Headley- 
Reeds radio sales manager. 

Barbasol (through Erwin, Wasey) 
began a 20-week campaign on 10 Jan- 
uary, after having been out of spot 
radio for some three years. The ac- 



count is using 30 ami. Mm. ements week- 
ly in New ^ oi k. 20 weekl) in Chi. 
ami plan- to increase it- frequency in 
( ihicago. 

"We went back into spot radio be- 
cause we felt the medium gave us bet- 
ter coverage and more frequency for 
our budget than any other medium," 
says Keith Shaffer, agency timebuyer 
for Barbasol. 

Late last fall, P&G, for Tide 
(through B\Bl. tested high-frequency 
in spot radio in a set area in order to 
correlate sales with the number of an- 
nouncements used. Schedules ranged 
from 100 to 400 a week, and, although 
-ales results have not all been tabulat- 
ed as yet, P&G is expected to maintain 
or increase the level of its spot radio 
spending in 1955. 

Nestle's Instant Coffee (through 
Bryan Houston) bypasses television 
in 28 out of 35 markets to buy high- 
frequency radio campaigns for special 
price promotions. Nestle's Instant is 
using spot radio differently this year 
than last: short waves of high frequen- 
cy, that is some 50 announcements a 
[Please turn to page 102) 



These are among buyers who have clients active in spot radio 




MacDonald Dunbar, Ted Bates, Vicki Cundell, Bryan Houston, 

buys powerhouse stations for buys frequency for Nestle's 

Carter Products for big cities Coffee for special promotions 




Bob Wulfhorst, D-F-S, buys 
small-town coverage for Cold 
Medal Flour, a CM product 



Larry Donino, Kcnyon & Eck- Peter Bardach, FC&B, use! 

hardt, buys big-city radio for day and night radio foi 

Nabisco s 100% Brand Cereal Rheingold in Eastern market! 



Croasdale, N. W. Ayer, Steve Suren, SSCB, buys day- John Marsich, Kudner, buys ra- |ohn Widholm, Lcnncn & New- Anita Wasserman, Lawrence C 

i to Atlantic Refining's time announcements for Fil- dio for special Ceneral Mo- ell. uses radio to introduce Old Cumbinner, bought 40 radio 

schedules in January bert's Margarine for 26 weeks tors short-range promotions Cold Filtertips in new cities markets for Q-Tips in January 




QUOTES SHOW RANGE OF REACTIONS TO 4 A's RECOMMENDATIONS 



4 4 



The rep>>ri i- an excellent and (>■ >~ i t i \ •■ step forward in ce- 
menting station-agency relations. . . . However, the section 
regarding rate- i- not so positive as it might be. Certainly it is 
the function of the agency to secure for its client the most favor- 
able rate possible in each time buy. It is not. however, in my 
judgment, the function of any agency to encourage station- to 
quote rate- which are unpublished or may even represent a bid 
for business 1>\ playing one station ofl against another. 1 have 
personal knowledge ol several instances where reputable agencies 
have whipsawed station against station by claiming their abiliiv 
to secure unpublished pi ire- fur time. This can only result in 
further pressures being brought to bear .on stations and conse- 
quently further lowering of the agency's impression of radio. It 
Bets -latino against Station in open price competition which nun 
temporarily be to the advantage of the advertiser or agency, but 
which in the long run can only work to the detriment of all radio. 
Therefore I would like to see the section on Rates state positively 
that all agencies should not seek rah- which are not published. 
As a matter of fact, as most agencies realize, there is great danger 
to any agency which bins from unpublished rates, since that 
agency has no assurance that it has received the lowest rate possi- 
ble. As a code, the report is fine, but does the 4 A's intend to 
implement it? Will broadcasters who feel that the code is being 
violated by a particular agency have any recourse'.' Does the 1 V-. 
by any chance, propose to allow its Broadcast Media Committee 
to be the place where broadcaster grievances could be referred 
so that the 4 A's could investigate such grievances? \nd would 
the broadcaster who resorted to notifying the committee be pro- 
tected from identification? Ii seems to me that this code needs 
implementation. Such a procedure as outlined in the above ques- 
tions might accomplish just that. If all stations who had a gripe 
about the way they were treated in regard to the provisions of 
this code would write the 1 A's no formal machinery might 
even be needed. Benedict Gimbel, Jr. Pres. WIP, Phila. 



44 



99 



/ 7 I believe this i- a needed and valuable policy statement. It 
• Wuill certainly work to the advantage of both media and 
agencies as time goes along, especially if the statement is given the 
wide-t possible distribution by agency principals and media own- 
er.-. We have long had a similar expression of policy for print 
media and it ha- been most beneficial through the years. I believe 
it vital thai everyone in the industry concerned with broadcasting 
read the language carefully and. above all. take it seriously and 
live up to the ethical standards which it clearly stales. Win. 0k ft 
R. Raker. Jr. Rd. Chmn. 4 A's and Renton & Bowles.' 7 



* y I am in full agreement with regard to (1) publicity, <2) 
• ©programs and commercials and (3) operating in the public 
intere-t. \- to <1> rates and (5) merchandising cooperation, I 
am in substantia] agreement with some qualification. While I 
agree that the agency is bound to seek for it- client the lowest rate 
available for any class of advertising, I do not agree that it be- 
comes the responsibility of the advertising agency to encourage 
the broadcasters to publish any special rate they may make. While 
1 agree thai a- a matter of ethics ami good business, whatever rate 
is made i,, one should be made available to all. it i- my opinion 
that the responsibility rests with the broadcaster to make this 
known. In m\ opinion it would be presumptuous of the adver- 
tising agency to tell a broadcastei to do it. \s to merchandising 
cooperation, I agree thai the advertising agency may accept what- 
ex. i merchandising cooperation a broadcaster makes available. 
However, I do not necessarily agree ilia; agency people should not 
demand oi encouragi other services. It then becomes a matter of 
determining what an- excess services or what free services are not 
a proper function ..I broadcasters. Here, too. I think the respon- 
sibility rests with the broadcaster. Because of the variance in 
merchandising services offered by stations, including the fact 
thai -one stations offei none, I think it i- the responsibility 
of the merchandi ing agency in try in gel from any broadcaster 
merchandi ing services a- are maximal witb the stations 
thai 'In make the-,- merchandising services available, ft % 
Emil Mogul, President, limit Mogul Company, Inc. 7 7 



... It is regrettable, and I might add embarrassing, that a 
situation exists in which the 4 A's has to put into print 
the-,- recommended 'rules of the road" for broadcasters. The many 
items covered . . . are really the provinces and obligations of the 
radio stations themselves. Responsible broadcasters run their 
respective businesses and stations with the highest of integrity 
and adhere rigidly to sound business practice-. . . . For these 
broadcasters, the recommended practices, as proposed by the 1 V- 
are superfluous and unnecessary. Other broadcasters, for whom 
these practices have been published out of necessity, should im- 
mediately lake step- to correct their operations in an effort to bring 
them in line with these ) \ recommendations. ... If each broad- 
caster complies, |this] will do much to raise radio from its present 
day 'left-over' -tatu> in advertising budgets to that of a pri- ^ ^ 
man medium. . . . E. O. Wayne, Sis. Mgr., WJR. Detroit. 7 7 



7 •The recommended Practices of AAA A i- an important con- 

w w tribution to the improvement of the already excellent rela- 
tions between this important group of buyers and the sellers of the 
radio industry. It goes about a- far as any group can agree to go. 
.Most of the minor irritations that exist in the relationships of 
agencies and broadcasters are beyond the scope of a document like 
this because they stem from the manner in which an individ- 
ual agency run- its own shop. Kevin Sweeney, Pres. R.iR. 



?> 



44 



An agency has no choice but to accept a good deal if a sta- 



of its clients. However, demands are out of order. We think we 
adhere to the recommendations but such code- perform a useful 
function. They set up standards that you try to live up to. The 
4 A's document should be circulated widely within agencies, and 
discussed. It might well be utilized at training meetings, ft ft 
Lloyd Raillie. Vice Pres. Head Plans Roard. SSCB.7 7 



4 7 ... A credo i- only as strong a- the will of ils participants 
• to hold to it. Freedom of interpretation should exist, but full 
and complete consideration must be made of other participants' 
views. But tackled with the right -pirit and complete' sincerity by 
all concerned, the 4 A's recommendations are to be highly ^ £ 
applauded. Jos. J. Weed. Pres. Weed Television Corp. 7 7 



7 7 .Most agencies are behaving themselves. We refused the ra- 
• • dio billing of a client a few years ago who wanted to buy off 
the rate card. But it is an agency's duty to il- clients to look 
into any packages station- submit. Both parties, in other word-, 
should abide by the same code. Our position must be that we 
are entitled to the same deal a- anyone el-e. It is our experience 
that the best stations usually will not make a ileal. The station 
which starts out by offering loo much to one agency may finally 
wind up unable to supply anything. Stations can do much toward 
setting up desirable agency relations by sticking to their ft £ 
gun-. Whitney Hartsliornr. Off. Mgr. Kririn Wascy. 7 7 



7 7 We think the recommended practices for ad agency people 
w w in their relations with broadcasters as approved by the \ \ \ \ 

i- a significant and constructive step. It i- further evidence of the 
important progress thai is being mad< in client-media relations, and 
we leel the program will have highly beneficial effects within 
the industry. J. L. Van Volkenburg, Pres. CBS TV. 



5? 



44 



\ station whose -ale- practice- approach those employed in 



They deprecate their own media and certainly make no friends. 
\gcneie- who look for the 'deal' buy aie in the -ame category and 
project themselves into a precarious position with their ^ ^ 
ents. . . .ThoB. B. McFadden, V.P. Mr. \li< Spot Sales. 7 7 

i Quotes continue page 1 1 1 I 



40 



SPONSOR 



Reactions to l.l's radi«-l v stand 

Rati k and merchandising statcmoiit wins approval, but also raises questions 



••^yhis i> terrific, a great help to sta- 
tions in stiffening resistance to deals." 

"They've come out in favor of moth- 
erhood and count rv ." 

"We like it, but why can't they put 
some teeth into it?" 

These three quotes, composites of 
statements made to sponsor, sum up 
broadcaster reactions to the American 
Association of Advertising Agencies 
recommendations against special rate 
deals with stations and other improper 
business practices. The recommenda- 
tions, first ever to be published by the 
4 A's on relations between agencies 
and broadcasters, appeared in full in 
the last issue of sponsor. 

Summed up. broadcaster opinion 
had these facets: 

1 . There was wide agreement that 
no matter how many codes are issued 
or statements promulgated, the buck 
rests with individual stations. It's 
their responsibility to operate on a 
firm-rate basis and nothing can do 
more good than broadcaster resolve 
to operate without barter, station men 
and reps agreed. 

2. However, some suggested that 
the 4 A's could help to relieve what 
was regarded as unfairly severe pres- 
sure from agencies by putting teeth in 
it> recommendations. Bernard Gim- 
bel. president of WIP, Philadelphia. 
suggested the 4 A's radio-tv commit- 
tee could act to hear station com- 
plaints. He feels station suggestions 
tould be used as a guide for the com- 
mittee in its action, without identifica- 
tion of the station. (See statement 
from Gimbel on page at left.) 

3. Station representatives stressed 
that the problem of rate deals went far 
beyond the matter of bargaining for 
special prices. There's strong feeling 
among many reps that the problem of 
dual station rates — national as well as 
local — is a growing menace to both the 
broadcasting industry and agencies. 
Robert Eastman. John Blair executive 
v.p. and chairman of the Station Rep- 
resentatives Association committee on 
rates told SPONSOR: "I p to 50 major 



national advertisers have been trying 
to get local rates in radio through dis- 
tributors and retailers." 

SK \ believes the solution lies in es- 
tablishment of a single rate -vstem. 
In the meantime. Eastman urges that 
the 4 A's take a stand against efforts 
of advertisers to obtain local rates. 
Implicit in rep warnings to agencies 
on the issue is the possibility that 
agencies will suffer if the advertiser 
seeks to place his national spot cam- 
paign on a local basis. 

4. Some of the not-to-be quoted 
comments indicated the heat of the 



Recommended Practices 
fir, 
Using Agent \ People 

in their Relations with Broadcasters 



it ii 



Copies can be obtained by writing to 4 A's. 
Recommendations were in 24 Jan. SPONSOR 



i>sues stirred by the 4 A's. Said one 
rep: "There's a tv code on program- 
ing but how many low-cut gowns do 
you still see? Id estimate that about 
2,500 radio stations out of the 2,600- 
plus are guilty of special deals. \ml 
all agencies demand deals when they 
can get them. The 4 A's recommenda- 
tions are meaningless. The guvs who 
sit on the board just don't know what's 
happening." 

Agency reaction can be summarized 
in these highlights: 

1. Agency men >av that better agen- 



cies observe the code anyway. They 
point out, however, that agencies are 
duty-bound to seek out the best rate 
and merchandising possibilities for 
their clients, that thev would be fool- 
ish to turn down a good deal offered 
bv a station. One agency president. 
Emil Mogul, said that it is "presump- 
tuous" of agencies to advise stations 
to publish all rates, though like others, 
he wants to be assured he is getting 
the same treatment as competitors. 

2. Agencies universally want to be 
assured of getting a deal as good as 
the next fellow's, which is why, says 
It win, Wasey General Manager Whit- 
nev Hartshorne, "the station that starts 
out offering too much to one agency 
mav finallv wind up unable to supply 
anything." 

3. In the long run, say ad men, 
the rate-cutter cheapens his station. 

4. Agency heads believe the code 
can have a long-range salutary effect 
as a standard setter, but that it will 
require education on the subject with- 
in agencies to produce results. 

5. Most important of all. in the 
view of a 4 A's director and big-agen- 
cy topper, is the fact that "the major 
purpose of the recommendations is to 
encourage the broadcasters to run the 
kind of business they should. 

sponsor queried all segments of the 
industrv. and received replies from 
broadcasters, agencies, representative-, 
trade associations. Respondents range 
from William R. Baker, Jr., Chairman 
of the Board of the 4 A's and of the 
Benton & Bowles agency, to non-4 A 
member Emil Mogul, whose agency 
has been in the forefront of the dis- 
pute with reps over efforts to get local 
rates for bis Rayco account. Among 
the most skeptical of respondent- is 
William Caskey, General Manager of 
\\ PEN, Philadelphia, who writ.- that 
the 1 \ statemenl will hardly solve 
anything bv merel) "purporting to 
wish that tin- situation would go 
away." Statements begin on the op- 
posite page. 



• • * 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



41 




PART TWO 

OF A THREE-PART SERIES 




Look-alike i\ plugs weaken 



J. here once was a millionaire named 
Obvious Adams. He got that way by 
solving everybody's big business prob- 
lems through a method overlooked by 
most of his fellow men. He did the 
obvious. 

Doing the obvious is no trick with 
us television copywriters. It's the easy 
ua\ out. Often a fairly safe and sound 
practice to boot. Trouble is, after a 
time we all get so confounded sound 
in our thinking we begin to look alike 
and talk alike. And our commercials 
do, too. 

So what's the answer? Avoid the 
obvious? As far as the video portion 
of our commercials is concerned, per- 
haps this is the road to recognition. 
It takes guts for a copywriter to fol- 
low it. And the fewer who have the 
guts, the better for those who do. 

Research today provides a pitfall for 
the copywriter inclined to lean on the 
picture-cliche. Certain research has 
now provided some generalities about 
food commercials: '"If you're selling 
food on tv, show somebody eating it." 
The implication is thai blunt, so it 
doesn t take brains and daring for 
an) copj w i iter to compl) . 

Bui wait a minute. In my own pri- 
vate list of Three Great Food Commer- 
i i.il- now on television, onl) one shows 
an\bod\ eating. In that one. a little 
girl is devouring a hunk of cake as 
big as her head. But there's a twist. 
No awkward posing here. She- uot it 
smeared all o\er her face. She knows 
and the viewer know- she's enjoying 
thai < ake. 

Then there - the weeklj series of 
cheese commercials, shol entirelj in 



closeup, casual voice-over, showing 
luscious ways of serving cheese with 
other foods and by itself. Nobody is 
eating it on camera, but my wife is 
drooling on sofa. 

And what about that slice of rye 
bread which eats itself away, bite by 
bite, in 20 seconds? Looks delicious 
without anybody to stare me down as 
he eats it. 

This is no brief against showing 
characters eating food in food com- 
mercials. It is a brief for avoiding 
the obvious — for working harder to 
create new and different visual se- 
quences that could prove to make your 
sales messages all the stronger. But 
once you achieve it. don't rest for a 
minute. Others will follow, so keep 
on the move. 

Properly applied, modern-day tele- 
vision research can be valuable to a 
copywriter. Improperly applied, it can 
make him picture-lazy. Those who ap- 
ply it improperly are those who are 



LAST ISSUE (24 Jan.) 

Are tv commercials getting 
weord'laxy? 



slaves to generalizations from research 
findings. If research, for example, ob- 
serves that from a group of food com- 
mercials tested, those which contained 
eating scenes scored highest, it is not 
always accurate to conclude that fu- 
ture commercials should necessarily 
picture eating scenes. No research can 
ever offer a formula to creativeness — 
and research experts are the first to 
admit it. No research can ever give a 
copywriter that one great visual idea 
that will set him above and beyond his 
competitors. It's onlv after he has the 
idea, and expresses it in an actual 
commercial, research can move in and 
tell him how great — or how lousy — it 
was. 

From the picture point of view, many 
tv commercials featuring on-camera 
personality selling realh get lazy. Of- 
ten you are forced to begin with three 
constants: ill your product. (2) the 
man or woman who sells it. and (3) 
i Please turn to page 98) 



COMING (21 Feb.) 



Are tv commercials getting 
talent-lazy? 



Arthur Bellaire, author of this series, is v.p. 
in charge of ratlin and tv commercial copy at 
BBDO. In his three articles, hi deplores tin 
various imitative ruts into which h( feels 
most tv commercials hue, fallen. Here, In 
points "ni trite scenes, poses, camera angles in 
video plugs which havt by now becomi "picture- 
cliches." Ih offers suggestions for fresh 
variations, makes plea for mori imagination 




42 



fommercials getting picture-lazy? 

| usages says Art Bellaire. Copymen must seek new, different visual ideas 



Avoid the obvious. In food commercials, it 
isn't necessary that the food be eaten. It can be 
effectively presented and sold in other ways 



Announeer-behind-desU should not be over- 
used. It is inexpensive but it is possible to 
spend even less and still be more interesting 



Cartoons bj Mphonse v 



Usual voiee-and-face approach shouldn't be 

expected to hold viewers still, compete with 

between-the-acts toilet habits. Use originality 




Steer ntvai/ from trite poses when showing 
someone holding your product. No one ever 
went wrong showing product in clear 




"a filmed version of 'Hit Parade' . . . but it's got far more in terms of style and 
class which is saying a lot . . . everything about the show spells quality ... a sure 
fire vehicle for any type of sponsor be it institutional, hard sell or any other/ 

/ VARIETY 




Music to the ears of discriminating regional 
and local sponsors searching for a new 
TV show that spells 



Sfatttkf He 



follywood's most attrac- 
tive, newest singing sensations JOAN 
WELDON and BYRON PALMER and one of 
the country's favorite recording groups — 
THE PIED PIPERS. 



&boc6tc&f4y Jac 



ick Denove.who super- 
vised the start of "Your Hit Parade" on TV, 
MUSICAL DIRECTOR-Nelson Riddle. 
CHOREOGRAPHER -David Lichine. 



<£zcA So*? lfatt \ a ||.»i 
favorites are spectacular production nur 
bers inspired by a heartwarming them 
such as "SHOW BOAT DAYS" . . . "ACAf 
EMY AWARD WINNING SONGS" 
"THE ROARING TWENTIES" . . . "SALU1 
TO LATIN AMERICA". 





■ 



A\ 



". . . probably the best musi- 
cal show ever done either 
live or on film for televi- 
sion." 

BILLBOARD 



". . . the brightest, most 
tuneful, most scenically im- 
aginative half-hour of music 
yet brought to TV." 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



"At last television is present- 
ing a top quality musical 
show . . . you'll come away 
shouting/ 7 
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE 




T&eset 6yfi*& 4tcc4 . . . 

iuperlative Singing, Entrancing Dancing, 
Superb Staging. 

TS THE FUN SHOW OF THE YEAR. 
C 0R THE WHOLE FAMILY! 




Don't delay. 

Strike it program-rich while YOUR area is still available. 

WITE! WIRE! VHONE! 

OFFICIAL FILMS mc 

25 WEST 45th ST., NEW YORK 36, N.Y. • PL 7-0100 

Atlanta • Baltimore • Beverly Hills * Boston • Chicago • Dallas • Detroit • Minneapolis • St. Louis 



o4*e&uc&4 &ac6k& cfofatfedbt <tf Qaa&ty ~/rir 7 ti0*Ht 



THE STAR AND THE STORY • MY HERO • COLONEL MARCH OF SCOTLAND YARD 
SECRET FILE U.S.A. • TERRY AND THE PIRATES • TUNE-O • TOWN AND COUNTRY TIME 



THE CRITICS TALK 

about that terrific new musical film show 



"EDDY ARNOLD TIME" 



says 



Billboard: 



'"Eddy Arnold 
Time' shapes up 
to be one of the highest potential TV film 
vehicles. There's no doubt that this show 
will stack up as winner and possibly rank as 
another Liberace. 

"The show follows a definite format with a 
unique utilization of a music base flavored 
with a story line. It seems to this reviewer 



says Variety: 



"This series has a lot 
of things going for it 
in the admittedly rugged musical telepix 
sweepstakes. It marks the telefilm debut of 
Eddy Arnold, whose name needs little pre- 
selling what with his RCA Victor recording 
sales now at the 30,000,000 level . . . And while 
Arnold, and rightly so, is the kingpin, it's more 
than a singleton effort, as he's aided and 
abetted by a worthy supporting cast in the 



that several innovations production-wise, will 
prove standard operating procedure for this 
as well as many other shows using songs and 
music. 

"All in all, the show rates as one of those 
few which are ideally suited for a million and 
one sponsors, and this probably is going to 
be the least of the worries confronting the 
property."— Steve Schickel 



person of Betty Johnson, a pert, telegenic lass 
with pipes to match, the Gordonaires, a real 
pro vocal quartet, and Hank Garland and 
Roy Wiggins, guitar specialists . . . 

"With host Arnold projecting potently 
throughout, this project has a folksy appeal 
that escapes the strict country and western 
idiom without alienating the c&w fans. It 
could well be the first big telepix winner bear- 
ing the Windy City dateline." — Dave 



says 



Janet Kern: 



"The producers will 
have the show spon- 
sored and on the air in time to cash in on the 
mammoth January publicity drive which 
RCA-Victor is planning in celebration of 
Eddy's 10th year with them. 

"The show may have a good chance to 
make TV film history of the Liberace sort. 

LiJUy Ml lOlU llC ...a thrilling new half-hour musical film series... 

featuring America's all-time singing favorite, Eddy Arnold . . . supported by a clever, talented cast. 



Arnold has sold over 30,000,000 records in 
the 10 years (none of his discs has sold less 
than 250,000 copies). When he replaced 
Dinah Shore on TV last year, some of his 
popularity ratings were higher than Dinah's 
... in fact, there were times he outrated 
Eddie Fisher, with whom he alternated." 
— Chicago American 



We've Got 'em 



. . . Prices, brochures, audition prints, order blanks! 26 half- 
hours now in production, ready for January release. Let's hear from you! 



WALTER SCHWIMMER CO. 



46 



75 East Wacker Dr., Chicago 1, III. — FRanklin 2-4392 

New York Office: Ted Beil, 16 E. 41st St. — LExington 2-1791 

Hollywood Office: Tom Carradine, 5746 Sunset Blvd. — HOIIywood 2-4448 

SPONSOR 




1955 




Project Editor 
Charles Sinclair 



► 



Scope: Tv film men predict a boom year and $80 
million gross in syndicated tv films and features 

Competition: Top firms make money, but rivalry 
is keen and mergers of syndicators are common 

Selling: Price spread can range from thousands 
to a few dollars weekly per market for tv films 

Clients: Syndicator-sold shows are aired at many lev- 
els, from network to local, as result of quest for sponsor 

I%ew films: Producers are busy developing new 
formats, from soap opera to cloak-and-sworders 

Color: Most production continues in black and 
white, bid a few firms are rolling in color film 

Research: Up-to-daU charts by ABB and Nielsen 

show audience composition*, rerun film audiences 



page 


48 


page 


50 


page 


50 


page 


51 


page 


61 


page 


05 


pages 55, 58 



$80 million Iv film imliisli 



.. 



I\o business for amateurs'* is how film men cleserihc 



JjM OVi ' than $60 million worth of gross business will be 
done in 1955 in made-for-t\ syndicated films. And another 
$20 million gross will be done in feature-length mo\ it- 
packages. That's the consensus of guesstimates from kt-\ 
executives among the 125 companies that make up the 
rambling, scrambling syndicated tv film industry. Total: 

->'• illion or more. 

\l>"ut S8 million worth of this sum will be in program 
film sales to sponsors who will air their film purchases on 
all of the three leading tv networks. Syndicators or syndi- 
cator-producers who landed business at this level include 
Screen Gems [Father Knows Best, Kin Tin Tin, Captain 
Midnight) via Genera] Artists Corp.: Television Programs 
of America (Halls of Ivy, Lassie, Captain Gallant) and 
Official Films \ Four Star Playhouse). MCA-TV, one of 
the "Big Three" syndicators, has no syndicated property 
directlj on the network, but does handle the sale of many 
packages at network level through its regular talent rep 
functions. SG also produces Ford Theatre (NBC TV). 
Some $12 million worth of film series will be contracted 
this \ear b\ national and regional advertisers for spotting 
on multi-market station lists that may run anywhere from 
five or six outlets to over 100 stations. A few : Ziv's Eddie 
Cantor show for Ballantine in 20 markets; MCA-TV's 



Soldiers oj Fortune for 7-1 p in over !<><> markets, starting 
in April: CHS TV Film Sales' Annie Oakley for Tv Time 
Popcorn on alternate weeks in 1 15 markets; Guild's 
Liberace for Bowman Biscuits in 12 markets; NBC TV 
Film Division's Badge 714 {Dragnet rerun) in 32 markets 
for Pure Oil; ABC Film Syndication's Passport to Danger 
in seven markets for Welch's Crape Juice. 

The bulk of the syndicated business in tv-tailored film 
series — about $40 million worth — will be done at the 
local level through syndicators' sales staffs. These local- 
level sales, film men estimate, will be split almost evenly 
between stations, and local agencies and advertisers. 

Almost all of the feature film packages — such as those 
of Associated Artists. General Teleradio. Holhwood Tv 
Service, Guild Films (formerly the MI'IA feature group) 
and Hygo — are sold directly to stations. Sales calls are 
rarely made by distributors on major ad agencies and clients. 

Top spot advertisers, however, are taking much more 
notice of feature film packages these days. This is particu- 
larly true of premium packages around which special pro- 
motions revolve. A good example: General Teleradio's 
Million Dollar Movie package showcased on WOR-TV, 
New York, which now has eight participating sponsors at 
$4,175 a week apiece in the multi-exposure showings. Over 



KutlffVts: Production spending is reaching new heights. Ziv's 
"Eddie Canter" show costs $55,000 weekly to produce in Hollywood. 
Shooting is in color. Show is sponsored in 201 U.S., Canadian cities 



,llt»r«7«»rs: Competitive pressures have forced many syndicators 
into 1954-55 mergers. Biggest was between MCA-TV and UTP last fall. 
Tie-up gives MCA 22 shows, such as new "Man Behind the Badge" 




SPONSOR 



ales and headaches aplenty 

nclicatecl television field, in whieh you ean get rich or poor overnight 



50 stations have bought the first MDM package, and mam 
leps are now* pitching slots in it to agencies. 

The biggest business is still in niade-for-tv-fihns. At a 
glance, the field looks like a real gravy train. It isn't. 

Less than half a dozen companies are really making 
mone\ in syndicated tv films. Another half dozen or so are 
important Factors in the business, but several are shaving 
their profit margins paper-thin. The rest are hanging on 
by their teeth, or else are specializing in some form of 
programing such as cartoons or educational pictures. 

In 1955, the syndicated film business is one of extremes: 

• The pricing range is almost beyond belief. A new 
show in the top market, for example, may command a 
price of up to $5,000 weekly. A rerun show in a small 
market may be grossing as little as $10 weekly. 

• The success of a few firms continues to be meteoric. 
Hut in the past year there have been more than half a 
dozen mergers and consolidations of syndicators who had 
been financially backed against the wall. 

• Syndicators are playing a wide variety of sales angles. 
Often, they will try several at once. A few are virtually 
shifting to production for network airing. One, Guild 
Films, is now in effect in open competition with networks. 
Others are concentrating on big multi-market sales. Still 



more are centering on station and local-level sale-. 

• The market is flooded with syndicated film properties; 
there are literally hundreds of series available. Producers 
and syndicator-producers toda\ are being forced to break 
away from stereotypes and to find (or invent) new types 
nl programing. In addition, budgets on existing shows are 
being upped 20 to 30' . . 

• Color filming en masse in the syndicated field just 
hasn't materialized. About 809? of new production foot- 
age will be black-and-white. But some producers are 
gambling on a 1955 or 1956 materialization of color tv in 
U. S. homes and are shooting all ( or nearly all i of their 
programs on tinted film. 

• Price-cutting, bargaining and various types of tie-in 
package "deals" are common in the syndicated film indus- 
try today. Prices at which some syndicators are selling 
existing film series in the top 50 markets are anywhere 
from 10 to 30' r below those of last year for many shows. 

That's the situation in brief. 

On the pages following, are more details on the syndicated 
film field today. Information was gathered by sponsor 
editors through a series of extensive personal interviews 
with executives of the major syndicators and syndicator- 
producers. * * * 



Ban i l/lllilt*/: A few firms are shooting in color. But most new 
production, such as shown below on "His Honor, Homer Bell" (syndi- 
cated by NBC TV Film Div.) is b&w. Reason: Scarcity of color sets 



.Mll.viccil.SJ One of new program film trends is to fancy musicals, 
such as Official Films' "This Is Your Music." Growing list of spon- 
sors includes Pacific Tel and Tel in 14 cities in three Coast states 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



49 




FILM: new sales gimmicks, new shows, new ouj 



Mtlltl-mtirln't: Budweiser recently bought 
"Damon Runyon Theatre." Here, D'Arcy ad- 
men Roland Krebs, Jack Macheca (center 
two) confer with Screen Gems' Ralph Cohn 
(left), GAC's Pat Lombard on 50-market deal 




Merchandising: Syndicators build audi- 
ence, gain sales prestige for their shows 
today by developing many merchandising 
angles. Michael Sillerman, TPA chief, and 
Jerome Capp, discuss tie-ins for "Ramar" 




Film "network": Guild Films has time- 
and-program sales plan with over 50 Vitapix 
stations and such shows as "Liberace." Brother 
George and KBTV's Bill Michaelson chat with 
pianist star before products of regional client 




Reruns: Market is flooded with film re- 
run shows, but best ones play on and on. 
Gene Autry films of CBS TV Film Sales have 
been shown as many as 17 times in a single 
market (Chicago), still draw ratings, clients 



COMPETITION. • razor-sharp 

Syndicated film- continue to offer 
the lure of millions of dollars in reve- 
nue to those who make the grade. 

Even major Hollywood studios, like 
20th Century-Fox and Republic Pic- 
lures, are currently eyeing big-time 
film syndication and have started 
edging into it. Fox is now planning to 
rent studio space to film producers and 
>\ ndicator-producers, is thinking seri- 
ously of tapping its own huge resources 
to enter tv film production. Republic 
has signed a SI million deal with Sax 
Rohmer for the Fu Manchu properties 
that includes a series of half-hour s\ n- 
dicated telepix. 

At the top of the heap among syndi- 
cators are such firms as Ziv. MCA-TV 
and Screen Gems. This "Big Three" 
group are thumping monetary suc- 
cesses; each grosses well over the $10 
million-annually mark and shows a 
substantial net profit. Although their 
chief reason for success lies in the 
quality of their present tv properties, 
each of these firms has been back- 
stopped in its growth by the financial 
resources of large, experienced parent 
companies. 

Ziv for years was by far the biggest 
and wealthiest radio syndicator. MCA- 
TV is the offshoot of one of the two 
leading talent agencies and has top- 
level sales and film talent contacts. 
Screen Gems is a subsidiary of Holly- 
wood's Columbia Pictures \Caine Mu- 
tiny, etc.) and has the facilities of one 
of the best studios on the Coast at its 
disposal. 

Television Programs of America, 
Ollicial Films and Guild Films have be- 
come notable successes in the syndica- 
tion field without being linked to major 
parents. All of these, however, have 
been the product of shrewd mergers 
and clever salesmanship which have 
thrust them into the front ranks. The 
nil work-owned syndication firms of 
ABC, CBS and NBC tv webs have been 
■mm i essful, although not in a class with 
the top iiidiislr\ leaders. 

But in the past 12 months, there has 
been a round o| mergers and consoli- 
dations that have made trade headlines 
again and again. The trend of old 
firms folding and new firms forming is 
likely to continue in L955, 1>\ all ex- 

peclations. The big one- get bigger. 
More than a dozen series from 
I nited Television Programs — includ- 
ing Waterfront. Heart of the City, Lone 
Wolj and Mayoi of the Town — were 



taken over in late 1954 by MCA-TV. 
\\\im Nathan, former v.p. of UTP, 
became a v.p. and general sales man- 
ager of MCA-T\ Film Syndication. 
The move ga\e MCA-T\ almost 
two dozen made-for-tv film series to 
sell in syndication. 

The fall also saw a linking of Guild 
Films, which has become a major syn- 
dicator in less than four years, and the 
station-owned \ itapix operation. Thus, 
Guild has a time-and-program tieup 
with stations in nearly 50 markets to 
cover such Guild properties as its new 
Ina Ray Hutton Show, Liberace, Life 
with Elizabeth and others. Late last 
month, Guild acquired the feature film 
packages of MPTV, which had been 
rumored in bad financial straits for 
nearly a year. 

There have been several others. 
MPTV turned its local-level syndication 
selling over to yet another merged 
group. UM&M. The re-activated Fla- 
mingo Films took over United Artists' 
Cowboy G-Men and also the Vitapix 
feature-length films made in Europe by 
Princess Pictures. National Telefilm 
Associates merged with Comet Tele- 
vision. Official Films took over the 
feature pictures sold by Lippert's Tele- 
Pictures. Consolidated TV Sales, one 
of the syndicator pioneers, joined 
forces with George Bagnall. 

The situation was summed up by 
John Mitchell, v.p. in charge of sales 
of Screen Gems, when he told SPONSOR: 
"To be successful in the tv film field, 
you've got to be a showman, a prophet, 
a great salesman and a good credit 
risk. Syndication is definitely no busi- 
ness for amateurs." * * * 

SELLING: poker face needed 

The top syndicators today can name 
a price and get it — provided the show 
is new, good and in demand on the 
part of stations and advertisers. 

Ziv, for instance, made many a syn- 
dicator turn green with envy when it 
asked for — and got— a reported $5,000 
weekh from Ballantine for just the 
New York market in the brewery's 26- 
market spread with the Eddie Cantor 
Show. Although the production budget 
on the Cantor show has. according to 
Zi\ President John Sinn, been running 
at "more than $55,000 weekly in the 
first cycle," Zi\ m>w -lands a good 
chance of getting it back, plus a nice 
profit, on the first run. The show, at 
last count, was sold in over 200 mar- 
ket- in the U.S. and Canada. 



50 



SPONSOR 



t ,v plans of industry are detailed in report below 



But syndicators whose lists of prop- 
erties lack big-name value and look 
verj much like similar lists of prop- 
erties are forced to use other tactics. 

A few syndicators are trying to keep 
up their sales pace through the use of 
"hulk" or "library" sales deals to sta- 
tions. particularly new outlets in new 
markets and uhf-ers in "mixed" mar- 
kets. Instead of purchasing a single 
series, a station may, under such a 
plan, sign up for a whole library of 
film series at a low per-show cost. Na- 
tional Telefilm Associates, which has a 
librar) plan whereby stations contract 
for as much as 1.000 hours of pro- 
graming, may get as little as $10 week- 
ly per rerun show from small stations 
in small markets. 

In between such extremes of pricing, 
almost anything goes. Some salesmen 
manage to maintain firm price struc- 
tures because their shows are "hot." 
Others conduct their business in the 
classic tradition of poker-faced horse 
traders, with the seller quoting a too- 
high price and the buyer a too-low- 
price until a compromise is reached. 

"Cut-price selling is one of the 
toughest problems we've got to face in 
film syndication," said Don Kearney, 
sales v.p. of ABC Film Syndication. 
"There's no industry-wide policing by 
an industry organization. Stations now 
haggle on almost every local-level syn- 
dicated sale, and brag to their friends 
if they can knock the price down. In 
the top 50 U. S. markets, show prices 
have generally been forced down as 
much as 30%, except for a few top 
programs." 

Is there such a thing as an "average 
price" for a half-hour film show? Film 
men queried by sponsor didn't for the 
most part think so. But continued 
questioning produced a "loose average" 
of around "$700 weekly" to sponsors 
for a strong show on a good station in 
a major market today. 

In explaining the wild pricing prev- 
alent in the industry, several film men 
pointed out that there's a reason for it. 
"Market-by-market pricing can depend 
on as many as a dozen variables — any 
one of which can change at almost any- 
time," is how Jake Keever. national 
sales manager of NBC TV Film Divi- 
sion put it. 

These factors, as sales executives 
describe them, vary from the size and 
importance of the tv market, the im- 
portance of the station involved, the 
time rates on the station, to the sta- 

7 FEBRUARY 1955 



tion's network affiliation. Other fac- 
tors: the general degree ol i ompetition 
in the syndicated field: the numbei .>| 
other shows of a similar type on the 
market; the age and "run" 'first? sec- 
ond/ subsequent?) of the film: wheth- 
er or not the market ^hows a growth 
potential in tv sets: whether or not new 
stations are due to come on in the 
market; the degree to which the profit 
margin of the syndicator can \»- 
trimmed. * * * 

CLIENTS: at every level 

The film syndication industry often 
looks as though it can't make up its 
minds about whom it's selling to. 

• Screen (Jems, for instance, is defi- 
nitely in the orbit of network film pro- 
ducers and program sellers. Accord- 
ing to sales v.p. John Mitchell, the Co- 
lumbia Pictures-owned firm draws 
"about 70 % of gross revenue from 
shows aired on networks, about 20% 
from various forms of syndication, and 
the rest from film commercials." 

• Television Programs of America 
will shortly have the same number of 
shows I three ) on the networks as 
Screen Gems, but will draw up to 50% 
of its expected 1955 revenue from 
straight syndication. TPA looks upon 
a network-aired show partly as a reve- 
nue-earner, partly as a prestige item. 
Stated Michael Sillerman, executive 
v.p.: "Local advertisers are happy to 
do business with a company that pro- 
duces films like Halls of Ivy and Lassie 
carried on national networks. It's like 
buying a car from General Motors or 
buying a bridge from U.S. Steel." 

• Ziv and MCA-TV are out of the 
network picture as far as syndicated 
properties go. Official Films has one 
package, Four Star Playhouse, aired 
on a network basis and draws only 
about 10% of its revenue from net- 
work activities. But all three will draw 
from 40 to 65% of their 1955 revenue 
from the sale of shows to sponsors for 
airing on a multi-market basis, and 
are actually competing strongly with 
network-controlled program selling. 

• Guild Films is even more com- 
petitive with networks, and has in ef- 
fect put itself forward as a direct rival 
of web telecasting. As a result of its 
tieup with Yitapix to offer time-and- 
program availabilities in over 50 mar- 
kets, Guild's Reub Kaufman told SPON- 
SOR that he had "no intention of sell- 
ing anv Guild shows to sponsors for 
airing on CBS TV, NBC TV or ABC 

{Please turn to page 60) 




f ll(<*ril<lf ioiltff : Film syndicators are mov- 
ing into foreign markets. Canadian Admiral's 
ad manager Denis Olorenshaw signs for ABC 
TV syndicated "Passport to Danger" for 26 
cities. ABCmen Shupert and Donato beam 




ftllf/c sales: New trend in syndicator sell- 
ing to local outlets is "library" package in 
which stations sign for hundreds of film hours. 
One of many shows in NTA's library sales is 
"China Smith" series with star Dan Duryea 




Features: Tony Martin, Yvonne de Carlo 
("Casbah") are stars in such big first-run 
feature packages as "Million Dollar Movie" 
of General Teleradio. On WOR-TV, N. Y., 
package has eigh* $4, 175-weekly sponsors 




Specialties: Growth of tv has meant bet- 
ter chance to syndicate special-appeal shows, 
such as Award Television's new, in-color 
"Jimmy Demaret" golf series. Show has star 
guests like Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Snead 



51 



it 



CHAMPIONS 
A TV RATING 



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under our exclusive contract. This show will build a top 
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petition—even the best feature films. 



All-Star Bowlers in the "Championship 
Bowling" Lineup: 

STEVE NAGY (1955 Ail-Star Singles Champion) 

DON CARTER (1954 All-Star Singles Champion) 

BILL LILLARD 

JUNIE McMAHON 

JOE WILMAN 

BUDDY BOMAR 

PAUL KRUMSKE 



AND OTHERS 




ED KAWALICS 
BUZ FAZIO 
JOE KRISTOF 
CARMEN SALVINO 
ROBBY ROBINSON 




BOWLING 
MASH HIT! 



Scores Exceptional Ratings 
in Market after Market 



n 



Here's a typical Metropolitan market experience: 
After 3 weeks on the air in Cincinnati (WKRC-TV) 
at 1 to 2 P.M. Sundays, "Championship Bowling" 
comes up with a terrific ARB . . . 



WKRC-TV 



14.2 



Here's a typical small market experience: In 
South Bend, Ind., where 3 stations come into the 
market, and against the week's top live sports 
show (CBS fights) on Wednesday night — this is the 
"Championship Bowling" Hooper: 



WSBT-TV 



22.0 



Second Station 3.6 
Third Station 3.0 




Second Station 6.0 
Third Station 2.0 



"Championship Bowling" also scoring rating "strikes" 
in 62 other markets including: 

WPIX-TV— NEW YORK • WGN-TV— CHICAGO 
WFBM-TV— INDIANAPOLIS • KHJ-TV— LOS ANGELES 
WDAF-TV— KANSAS CITY • KTRK-TV— HOUSTON 
KTVW-TV— SEATTLE-TACOMA . XETV— SAN DIEGO 
KFEL-TV— DENVER • WHAM-TV— ROCHESTER 
WMIN-TV— MINNEAPOLIS 



For descriptive brochure, prices and audition 
film, write, wire or phone 

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New York Office: Ted Beil, 16 E. 41st St. — Lexington 2-1791 
Hollywood Office: Tom Corradine, 5746 Sunset Blvd. 

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For further information or audition prints, phone, write, wire, Award Television, 1501 Broadway, Room 1501, N. Y. C, N. Y., Wl 7-6 



FILM: can reruns still draw large audiences? 



Answer to this poser, on the basis of the Nielsen figures 
below, is "yes." Film rerun share of audience is only 9% 
lower than original telecasts, and average minutes of view- 
ing only 6% less than first run. Since study is basically 
a comparison of winter originals with summer reruns, drop 
in ratings is due mostly to lower sets-in-use at time of 



rerun shows. Charts here analyze repeat telecasts during 
both summer and winter of 1954 of 24 different programs 
— a total of 254 reruns. Says Nielsen firm of comparison 
of new and initial rerun showings: "No appreciable differ- 
ence shown." Study is based on Nielsen Television Index 
figures and are thus considered representative of U. S. 



Summer ratings drop but share holds up well on reruns 

NIELSEN RATING SHARE OF AUDIENCE 


Avera 
lower 
the p< 
a mor 
utes v 
is 91^ 


31.1% 
Original 

ge of the 2 
in rating tl 
>tential aud 
e accurate a 
iewed." Tb 
o of the lev 


54i 

lan 
ienc 
ppr 
e a 
el o 


22.0% 

Rerun 

epeat film 
the origina 
e is consid 
sisal involv< 
verage rem 
f the origin 


telec 
1. B 

erabl 

is sh« 
n she 
al, a 


asts c 
at, as 
j low 
ire of 
w get 
:cordi 


47.2% 
Original 

becked by 
Niehen po 
er during t 
audience ai 
s a share o 
ng to the ti 


Niel 
ints 
ie r 
id a 
f au 
r re* 


43.1% 

Rerun 

sen is 29% 
out, "since 
erun times, 
verage min- 
dience that 
earch firm. 





No "mass walkout" on tv reruns 

AVERAGE MINUTES VIEWED 




22.0. 



In 




Reruns also hold audience* who 
dial them, even if large per- 
centage has seen it before. 
Rerun is less than two minutes 
below level of first run in terms 
of minutes spent viewing a show. 



Winter season repeats are only 20% "off" in rating, and almost a match in share of tv viewing audience 

NIELSEN RATING SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



ORIGINAL RERUN ORIGINAL RERUN 

28,1% 28.1% 

22.5% 

18.6% 



ORIGINAL RERUN ORIGINAL RERUN 

43,3% 38.7% 42.5% 39 .3 % 



WINTER 



SUMMER 



WINTER 



SUMMER 



Special break-out of summer and winter repeats were 
part of Nielsen study. Summer repeats fell between 15 
June and 15 September; winter reruns at any other 
time. Charts give admen a chance to find out how well 
a rerun show will do if it runs in the same season as 
the original show (not just summer vs. winter). In 
terms of ratings, winter repeats (there were 53 last 
year) were only 20% lower than the first runs. Summer 



repeats were 34% lower than the originals. But winter 
rerun shares of tv viewing audience were only off an 
average of 11%. Summer repeats were off even less — 
8%. The reruns in both seasons also held up strongly 
in terms of average number of minutes of viewing. Win- 
ter repeats were down 5% and summer repeat shows 
were down 7%. Admen therefore can safely assume 
that good reruns will draw big audience at any season. 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



55 





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FILM: How does film audience composition vary? 



The chart below, speciallj prepared for sponsor by the 
American Research Bureau, will be of great value to tv 
admen who have asked questions such as these: "Do kids 
really watch kid shows?", ""What kind of syndicated films 
do women watch.-'"" or "Do mysteries reach only an all- 
male audience?" Most of the shows below are well-known, 
and represent several basic types within program cate- 
goric-. Percentage figures in columns below are based on 
ARH tv ratings for the month of October, 1954 in a cross- 
section of major I . S. markets. These markets comprise 
New York. Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas-Fort Worth, St. 
Louis and Atlanta. 

The chart contains facts which may come as a surprise 



to many tv agencymen and clients. Western shows, for 
instance, aren't confined just to the moppet audience; they 
get anywhere from a third or more of their audiences from 
adults. Mystery shows sometimes draw female viewers in 
amounts that compare favorably with straight drama and 
musical programs; "City Detective," for example, pulls 
50% of its audience among the ladies, "I Led Three Lives" 
draws 45%. Situation comedies, such as "My Hero," draw 
a well-balanced "family" audience — one reason whv they 
are so popular with advertisers seeking a mass audience. 
Some individual shows are clearly reaching specific audi- 
ences. "Douglas Fairbanks" has a few kid viewers, appeals 
to adults. Time slot, of course, is important factor. 



COMPOSITION OF AUDIENCE 




Westerns 

RANGE RIDER 



MEN WOMEN CHIL. 

17 17 66 



ANNIE OAKLEY 



21 23 56 



WILD BILL HICKOK 



24 21 55 



KIT CARSON 



26 27 47 



Adventure 

SUPERMAN ... 



16 21 63 



WATERFRONT 


34 


29 


27 


RAMAR OF THE JUNGLE 


22 


20 


58 


TERRY AND THE PIRATES 


15 


17 


68 



Mystery 

BADGE 714 



32 37 31 



1 LED THREE LIVES 


30 


45 25 


RACKET SQUAD 


33 


40 27 


CITY DETECTIVE 


37 


50 13 






COMPOSITION OF AUDIENCE 



Situation Comedy 



MY HERO* 



Drama 



Chiltiren's Shows 

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSON* 




MEN WOMEN CHIL. 

30 32 38 



LIFE WITH ELIZABETH* 


21 34 45 


MEET CORLISS ARCHER 


21 40 39 



JANET DEAN, R.N 


32 


39 


29 


DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS PRESENTS . 


39 


58 


3 


FAVORITE STORY 


30 


43 


27 


STORIES OF THE CENTURY 


35 


41 


24 



13 18 69 



Music 

GUY LOMBARDO* 33 44 23 

LIBERACE 32 56 12 

FLORIAN ZaBACH* 33 64 3 

.Sports 

ROLLER DERBY* 35 44 21 

■Rated in our market onlj 



58 



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7 FEBRUARY 1955 



59 



FILM SELLING 

[Continued from page ~>1 i 

I \ and thai he would "concentrate 
strictl) <mi major regional and local 
sales." 

• National Telefilm Associates has 
two new packages, Country Doc/or and 
Parole Chief ( the latter from the earli- 
er \ itapix i which it hopes to sell first 
in big multi-market deals. But VI \ 
will probabl) draw ii|> to 7-V / of it> 
revenue this year from strictl) local- 
level sales. "'l "ii make more in '\ 



per-markel on a local deal if you're 
willing to take the long haul in getting 
your mone) back," NTA's Martin 
Roberts explain. "On a network-level 
or majoi regional sale, you may have 
to discount your prices for such a 
multi-market sale to the point where 
your over-all profit margin narrows. 
Resides, you re then in a \ ulnerahle 
financial position. If your big client 
cancels. \ou ve real!) not to scramble." 
Is there a rhyme and reason to these 
divergences in sales approaches? 



Th 



e answer is '"\ es. 



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Syndication selling is motivated 1>\ 
two industry-wide pressures: 

1. The time squeeze. The difficul- 
ties that sponsors — and s\ ndicators — 
run into in clearing time slots for tv 
film shows cover a wide range. Pure 
Oil, for instance, airs its Badge 71 1 
in 32 markets throughout the Midwest 
and South. The film shows la rerun 
of Dragnet) are spotted in such mar- 
ket- as Chicago. Cleveland. Milwaukee, 
Cincinnati, Norfolk and Atlanta. 

Because the show is a strong prop- 
er!) and Pure Oil moved into its time 
slots early in the game, the show 7 gets 
<'\t-opening spots. No less than 100' I 
ul the 32 stations air the show in slots 
between 7:00 and 10:30 p.m.; 60% 
of them air Badge somewhere between 
8:00 and 10:00 p.m. — tv's peak view- 
ing hours, according' to Nielsen. 

But clearances like this are the ex- 
ception, particularly on stations in the 
Eastern U.S. Network programing has 
spilled over into the 10:30-11:00 p.m. 
slots across the board on NBC TV and 
CBS J\ in Eastern areas and runs as 
early as 7:00-7:30 p.m. In between, 
the "S.R.O." sign is out. Even though 
stations make more money from spot- 
placed syndicated film shows, there's 
often just no time for sale. 

"The question we're asked most of- 
ten by major agencies when we're 
pitching a show for a multi-market 
sale/' said Official's Herb Jaffe, "is 
'what kind of time slots can we get?' 
I 11 tell them '^ nu can get good slots 
if \ou hunt hard enough" but it's hard 
to convince admen of this." 

Result: S\ ndicators today have to 
take a long, hard look at their evict- 
ing properties and then decide just 
how high they can shoot with it. 
"When producers are talking new 
properties to us or showing us pi I, it 
films, we can tell toda) with a fair 
degree of accuracy just what kind of 
time slots a show can command," 
stated David Sutton. MCA-TA v.p. in 

charge of film syndication. "The best 
ones will be no problem to the spon- 
sors. Stations will manage to clear 
slot- even in network time' for them. 

and we II ha\e no hesitation about sell- 
ing them to multi-market advertisers. 

Bul the shows below the lop le\el will 

have to be sold on a local or small re- 
gional basis. 

'* I hat - win you'll see some syndi- 
cated -hows aired on networks, some in 

big multi-markel deals, some in local 
sales and some offered at cut prices on 



60 



SPONSOR 



an) basis whatsoever," he concluded. 

2. The financial squeeze: The big 
New York and Hollywood banks and 
financial interests that loan money to 
tv film procedures and syndicators — 
Chase National. Banker's Trust and 
Hank of America, to name the leaders 
— also determine, in a roundabout 
way, the direction of much syndicated 
selling. 

In order to launch a tv film series 
todav, a producer or syndicator-pro- 
ducer combine must be able to scare 
up. by industry consensus, at least 
$300,000 for a 13-week, half-hour 
film series. The money is borrowed — 
and must be paid back. 

I! a film seller has plenty of money 
to meet his notes, there's no great 
problem. But if he's caught in a 
squeeze — and some of the biggest firms 
in the industry have been so caught — 
between his operating and/or produc- 
tion costs and slowly moving sales on 
a new product, hell look quickly for 
a way to unload. 

He will, in other words, no longer be 
able to make a higher — if slower — 
profit in market-by-market, station-by- 
station sales of his films. He may have 
to ill make a discounted offer to a 
network-level or major regional adver- 
tiser, or (2) start slashing prices at 
the local level or make a tie-in sale be- 
tween his "cold" property and a "hot" 
property (as rum was sold with scotch 
during the last war). 

This doesn't mean that all the big 
network-level and regional sales you 
see todav in the syndicated film field 
are caused b\ film men who are dump- 
ing their products in a hurry. Most 
are high-level, profit-making sales. 
But some of the "big" sales in recent 
months have operated on paper-thin 
profit margins in which the syndicator 
heaved a sigh of relief to be out from 



under the problem if only for a sin- 
gle season. 

"You have to have a strong property 
thai will command good time slots — 
and sponsors — in all major cities to 
even make back the original 'nut" on 
a tv film series today," is how a CBS 
TV Film Sales executive. \\ alter Scan- 
Ion, summed it up. Added the film 
man. "You can make more mone\ in 
tbi' long run from straight syndication, 
but you can also sink before you get 
your investment back in local sales 
today." * * * 

JVEW FILMS': "no stewotypes" 

If the swidicated tv industry were to 
film its own story, it would look some- 
thing like a speeded-up motion picture 
about the rise of the Hollywood the- 
atrical film industry. 

Tv filming had its initial burst of 
programs in which the tv audience — 
and sponsors — ate up practically any- 
thing that came along. Then, in the 
past three or four years, star names 
have developed, major Broadway and 
other properties have been adapted. 
At the same time, some performers 
have slid toward oblivion and some 
producers found they just couldn't 
make the grade. 

Today, as the 1955 advertising sea- 
son begins to hit its stride, the new 
programing from syndicators is reach- 
ing a maturity of technique and plan- 
ning. 

Several major trends are apparent: 

1. The drive to upgrade production. 
There's been a general upward trend 
anyway in production budgets — in the 
neighborhood of 10% for the indus- 
try on the average — due to union and 
talent demands, and the higher cost of 
film raw materials. 

But producers and syndicator-pro- 
ducers are spending more money to- 



I 



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h It's a new trend inspired by Filmack • 
pioneered - stop- motion techniques. 

Contact Filmack for all your TV film problems! 



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New York, N.Y. 



DOGGONE 
SPY STORIES 
SINCE 
MATA HARI 

And CESAR ROMERO stars in them 
as Steve McQuinn, globe-trotting 
diplomatic courier. The people you 
want to reach will follow Romero . . . 

into a strange adventure which 
starts in a Budapest prison . . . 

on the trail of a missing scientist in 
Tangier . . . 

through a near uprising in 

Casablanca . . . 

on a rescue mission in Ankara . . . 

as he risks his life for a lady in 
Madrid . . . 

even to the inner chambers of the 
fabulous Scotland Yard. 

What a show! What a star! What a 
sure-fire selling vehicle! Better 
reserve your market . . . now! 

CESAR ROMERO, starring in . . . 





ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y. 
CHICAGO • ATLANTA . HOLLYWOOD • DALLAS 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



61 




VTHI-TV Channel 10 

is the ONLY station 

with complete coverage 

of the Greater 

Wabash Valley 

• One of the Mid-west*! 
most prosperous indus- 
trial and agricultural 
markets 

• $714,500,000 Retail 
Sales in year '53-'54 

• Blanketed ONLY by 
WTHI-TV« 316,000 
watt signal 

• 227,000 Homes 
<147J)00 TV homes) 



118,000 

UNDUPLICATED 
WTHI-CBS 
TV HOMES! 

WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 
TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

316,000 "S'atts 



Regimented nationally 

Thr Balling Co. 
Sett > or A. A Chicago 



da\ than ever before for present pro- 
duction. Here are - examples: 

• Xiv ha? put a weeklj shooting 

budget ■ "ii the new Eddie 

Cantor syndicated series, and is seek- 
ing the top star names and variety acts 
tor appearances. The production bud- 

_ - on other Zi\ shows have been 
upped as well, although price? of ex- 
isting shows <I Led Three Lives. Cor- 
inker. Favorite Stor\. etc.) are 
remaining relatneh constant. 

• Screen Gems' productions are all 
in the "quality" class today. \ >oon- 
to-he-launched Screen Gems show. 
} on Can't Take It If ith } on. based on 
the Broadway play, will he budgeted at 
up to $50,000 weeklj . Father Knows 
Best, which Kent Cigarette- is exiting 
on CBS TV, costs Screen '.ems up to 
$40, weekly. 

• Guild's highl) successful Liberace 
series will have its production level 

-led this spring. "We'll even give 
Liberace a solid gold candelabra if it 
looks like it'll make the show better."' 
a Guild official stated. Guild is in< reas- 
ing the size of the or< hestra mi the 
show, staging fancier musical produc- 
tion numbers and is seeking further 
for more elaborate orchestration-. \ew 
budget: over $40, ' weekly. 

• I he • <>-t rise isn't confined to just 
the top syndicated product. Some of 
the medium-budget -hows are boosting 
a? well. A good example: Hal Roa< h - 
Passport to Danger, syndicated 
through ABC TV. Last \ear the show 

- under ^20.000 weekly. This sea- 
son the cost has gone up to nearlv 
S25,000. 

2. The drive for new audiences: A 
quick scanning of any of the standard 
reference books for svndicated t\ films, 
such as the SRD> Films for Television. 
will show you that there's hundreds of 
dicated film series available. Man) 
are so much alike that the scripts, cos- 
tumes, settings and even actors are 
\ irtually interchangeable. 

\- a result of this overabundance of 
"look-alikes." many syndicators are 
making everv attempt to find I 1 ' new 
types of programing that will appeal 
to the same audiences, and i2i new 
-how- that will bring new audi< 
or be right for slotting in new time 
period-. 

Here are some highlights ol tln- 
h : 

• Official Films i- staking much of 
it- hopes t"i new 1955 programing on 
two program types it i- developing 
rapidl) daytime shows and costumed 








Nation's Largest Production 
Centers for Quality ... 



TV FILMS 

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62 



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TOP TWO... 

CBS IN COLUMBUS, GA, 

WRBL RADIO 

5-KW 

(NCS 1952— 40- 100 '< ) 

Population 418.600 

E. B. Income (000) §519,137 
Retail Sale, (000) §257.776 

WRBL-TV 

channel 4 

(Pul?e Area Survej Nov. °.">1) 

Population 737.910 

E. B. Income (000) 8785.909 
Retail Sales (000) 8442,308 
Source 5.1/ May 1954 



"%te 




MP/O 

AM FM 



COL UMBOS, GEOZ&M 



'(%nuufr 



CALL -HOLL/NG-3E72Y 



CJJentlal 



Co 



veraye 



1 



UNDUPLICATED! 



WWOR-TV, CH 
serves and sells 



14 




Now, * Over 76,000 UHF sets 
Receive the Best Picture on 
Worcester County's Only 
TELEVISION STATION! 

•Based on Pulse, Inc., Survey, Dec, 1955 



see PAUL H. RAYMER CO. 

WW© HUT V 

1ST STATION IN NEW ENGLAND'S NO. 3 MAIKET 
ABC — DUMONT 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



melodramas. In the first of these areas, 
Ofli< ial is launching Juliet Jones, an 
' across-the-board daytime soap opera 
! based on the syndicated comic -trip of 
! the same name. Budget: SI 5,000 week- 
Is about >(>.000 more than the aver- 
age live network soap opera. "This is 
I one kind of show that doesn't exi-t in 
quantity and which stations can't du- 
plicate locally," said Official's Herb 
Jaffe. The syndicator will also have 
no less than three new made-in-Europe 
costume series — Robin Hood, Three 
Musketeers and Scarlet Pimpernel. 
"You've got private eyes, cop-. West- 
ern heroes, international adventurers 
aplenty today." Jaffe explained, "but 
who's got historical adventure?" Of- 
ficial expects to launch a twin trend 
with its soap opera and adventure 
show-. 

• Ziv is planning to launch a pro- 
gram series shortly aimed at the mil- 
lions of Americans who dote on sci- 
ence fiction. In conjunction with Ivan 
Tors. Ziv will soon start Hollywood 
production on ScientiFiction Theatre, 
with a high production budget. Tales 
of Tomorrow is currently being syn- 
dicated on a re-run basis (via kine- 
scopes I by an independent distributor. 
Tee Vee Co., but Ziv will have the field 
pretty much to itself with this brand of 
adult '"space" entertainment. More 
may soon be on the way. 

• TPA may be the first s\ ndicator 
to offer the Sahara sands instead of 
prairies as the locale of an outdoor ad- 
venture series. Due to start shortly 
on NBC TV 1 60 stations) is Captain 
Gallant of the Foreign Legion, for 
Heinz, with TPA syndicating it as well 
in non-Heinz markets. Independent 
producer Ed Gruskin will soon join in 
with Pepe le Moko ' remember Charles 
Boyer in Algiers? I, a series to be shot 
in North Africa and syndicated 
through I M&M. Errol Flynn is ex- 
pected soon to turn tv film star and 
appear in a series called March or Die 
I the Foreign Legion again i to be syn- 
dicated through CBS TV. 

• Major Television Productions, a 
distributor of feature and religious 
films, recently announced that it would 
seek a specialized audience through 
syndication: the well-educated class. 
Soon to be launched in syndication 
will be a half-hour series called En- 
chanted Music, a pot pourri of opera, 
s\ mphony and ballet. Also due from 
Major this year: a quarter-hour series 
of piano class* -. called Music for 
Millions: a series of half-hour political 



HOW TO 
TURN A 
"HOT" 



INTO 

COLD CASH: 



BUY CESAR ROMERO... 

always a big name — now even bigger! 
(Current top-budget motion pictures, plus 
high-rated tv appearances prove it) 

IN PASSPORT TO DANGER... 

a high-tension series of world-wide 
adventure . 

TO SELL YOUR PRODUCT 

to his vast ready-made audience! Other 
top advertisers are selling their products 
with this show. Why don't you? 



CESAR ROMERO, starring in... 




TO 

DANGER 




CHICAGO 



ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y. 

• ATLANTA . HOLLYWOOD ■ DALLAS 

63 




T. WASHINGTON TV 




"Best darn salesman I've ever seen!' 



Talk about a good salesman! Mt. 
Washington TV makes the calls — 
plenty of them. Its territory is most 
of Maine, New Hampshire and Ver- 
mont which it covers at about half 
the cost of any other three TV stations 



in the area combined. The sponsors of 
Jack Benny, The Lone Ranger and 
Person to Person are among over 80 
national advertisers who have put their 
money on one of the best salesmen in 
the business — Mt. Washington TV. 



CBS-ABC 



WMTW 



Channel 8 



John H. Norton, Jr., Vice Pro., and General Manager REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HARRINGTON, RIGHTIR A PARSONS, Inc. 



64 



SPONSOR 



documentaries called The World s 
Powder Kegs in a style somewhat like 
the March of Time; and a series of 
fairv tales set to music. • • * 

COLOR: "u-atvhiul waiting" 

The rush into syndicated color films. 
anticipated last year at this time, 
hasn't materialized. 

1. Producing: Only a handful of 
firms are regularl) producing color 
films for syndication on a speculative 
basis. These include two of the indus- 
try leaders — Ziv and Guild — and a 
number of the smaller independents, 
such as Sheldon Reynolds, Award 
Television, George Bagnall, United 
Producers-Distributors, Lakeside and 
Mode-Art. Ziv films every one of its 
shows in color. 

******** 
"Let us turn our backs on the prophets 
of doom — let us he self -confident real- 
ists. We will have readjustments or 
dips in business from time to time over 
the years, but we need not have a dev- 
astating depression if we guard against 
being paralyzed by fear. Since free- 
dom and confidence are essential part- 
ners in progress, we must be certain 
that we sustain our confidence as indi- 
viduals and as a nation.* 9 

ROGER M. KYES 

Vice President 

General Motors 

Detroit 

******** 

2. Testing: Another small group 
has shot some syndicated films in col- 
or, but aren't active in color produc- 
tion at the moment. Screen Gems 
turned out a series of Ford Theatre 
films (aired on NBC TV but also syn- 
dicated) in color. Now, Screen Gems 
V.p. Ralph Cohn says "we will do 
nothing on speculation." Part of the 
Gene Autry production (syndicated by 
CBS TV) has been in color, but fu- 
ture plans, according to producer Ar- 
mand Schaefer, are "indefinite." Two 
of the MPTV properties now handled 
by UM&M— Duffy's Tavern and Jun- 
ior Science — are in color, but the oth- 
ers are continuing in black-and-white. 

3. Waiting: Most producers and 
s\ ndicators are following color devel- 
opments closely but aren't doing am 
more than organizing their color plans. 
This group includes MCA-TV, TPA, 
NBC Film Division, ABC Film Syndi- 
cation, Official. CBS TV Film Sales. 
Typical comment: "We'll be ready 
when the color receivers are there. 
Meanwhile — black-and-white," said 
David Sutton, v.p. in charge of MCA 
TV syndication. 

The principal roadblock to syndi- 



cated color production is no longer a 
question of "what film stork is best? 
or "how do we dress a set properly 
for color filming?" It's a matter of 
the scarcity of color receivers and the 
-low rate of installation of color film 
projection gear by local stations. 

A year-end checkup 1>\ SPONSOR 
(see 27 December. 1954 issue, p. 91) 
showed thai less than 18.000 color re- 
ceivers were manufactured in the first 
10 months of last year, and that onlj 
300.000 (enough for about one in ten 
t\ homes I will be made in 1955. A 
sponsor survey of stations showed too 
that while more than 50% of station- 
are now geared to telecast network 
color only about 30% will have local 
color film equipment by the end of 55. 

Speculative color filming in the syn- 
dicated field is generally treated as a 
long-range investment, not a present 
commercial reality. Ziv's John Sinn, 
for instance, told sponsor that the firm 
had invested "more than $4 million" 
in its post-1949 color production and 
that "it may take quite a while to re- 
cover all of the color costs but we 
know we will eventually." 

Color is also a luxury investment. 
Guild's Reub Kaufman, who has shot 
a series of 13 Liberace shows in color, 
says that "to film the same show in col- 
or, with no substantial variations from 
black-and-white production, adds any- 
where from 20 to 30% on top of pro- 
duction budgets." 

In the competitive syndication field 
— where costs must often be held to 
a rock-bottom minimum — this differ- 
ential can seldom be passed along to 
the bu\er today. Few syndicators are 
willing to try . 

The generally cautious attitude of 
syndicators toward color production is 
also traceable to the mixed successes 
of the few color film operations to date. 
Last fall, for instance. Ford decided 
to pay Screen Gems to switch produc- 
tion on Ford Theatre into color. Costs 
immediately went up about 20%, most- 
ly for color film stock and processing. 
The original plan was to have 25,000 
RCA color sets installed in Ford show- 
rooms on which invited guests would 
see Theatre and the Ford-sponsored 
"spectaculars" on NBC TV. 

"The sets," a Screen Gems official 
explained, "just never materialized in 
the quantity expected. After eight 
films in color, Ford decided to drop 
color filming with the 14th show, and 
not to resume until a color audience 
was there." * * * 



ANOTHER CITY 
HEARD FROM... 




"RACKET SQUAD" 




IS #1 AGAIN! 

Yes, in city after city, Telepulse rates 
Racket Squad as the #1 film show. 



Look: 




ATLANTA 


#1, with 29.6 


CHICAGO 


#1 after 3 weeks 


DETROIT 


#1. with 23.5 



WASHINGTON = 1 after one month 

No wonder this record-busting show 
boasts 90% renewals after only 9 
months in syndication! First run still 
available in many top markets. Come 
on in fast, the selling's fine! 

RAQ^CET^ 
SQUAD 




ABC FILM 
SYNDICATION, INC. 

7 West 66th St., N. Y. 

CHICAGO • ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD ■ DALLAS 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



65 



THE BIGGEST STEP IN TELEVISION 




At 9:00 P.M. on December 18th a little 
toy soldier stepped in front of a TV camera. 
Ninety minutes later he walked off . . . and 
"Babes in Toyland" had become the number 
one-rated program.* 

A Max Liebman color Spectacular, "Toyland" 
was seen in over 14,500,000 homes with 
a rating of 50.5. 

Our toy soldier was joined in the 
Nielsen Top Ten by "Dateline", a 
Producers' Showcase Spectacular. 

Thus far this season eleven Spectaculars have 
appeared on NBC. Here is the record. 

• Eight of the eleven won Nielsen Top Ten 
rating honors 

• Average rating — 40.3 

• An average of more than 11,400,000 homes 
reached by each Spectacular 

In addition to "Babes in Toyland" and 

"Dateline," four other NBC programs were in 

the Top Ten, bringing the total to six for 

the latest Report. That's twice as many as the 

| second network. Such program leadership 

[ as this over the last fourteen weeks has enabled 

NBC evening shows to deliver an average of 
I 
576,000 more homes than the next network. 

All of which puts our advertisers a big 
step ahead, too. 



NBC PROGRAMS 




HOMES 


IN THE TOP TEN 


RATING 


REACHED 


Babes in Toyland 


50.5 


14,569,000 


Dragnet 


44.1 


12,824,000 


Buick-Berle Show 


42.0 


12,243,000 


Groucho Marx — 






Yon Bet Your Life 


41.1 


12,063,000 


Martha Raye Show 


40.4 


11,655,000 


Dateline 


40.3 


11,506,000 



Exciting things are happening on 




TELEVISION 



a service of 



*Nielsen second 1)< r, mher Report. All data verified l>u A. C. Nielsen Co. 








They sold 10 busses in 24 hours 



Want proof of radio's continuing wallop? Ask the Seattle 
Transit System. They released ten "million mile" busses 
to Radio KING'S disc jockeys. Within 24 hours, all ten busses 
were snapped up by KING's eager listeners. At $200 a clip. 

The buyers used good judgment, too. One family bought 
a beach bungalow for beautiful Puget Sound. A second bus will 
blossom into a backyard hot house. And a neighborhood 
church bought three busses to start a new Bible school. 

lust prows what radio can do these days . . . even if Radio 
K IV i is an exception. By exception, we mean results on 



KING are always exceptional. KING'S men can sell anything 
They make minor miracles look easy. 

Got a tough selling problem in the booming Seattle 
market? Get in touch with KING. It's the station with the 
Sunday punch that works all through the week. 



50,000 Watts 
ABC Blair, Inc. 



FIRST IN SEATTLE 



Radio KING 




iVew developments on Si*OJ%SOR stories 



SPONSOR \isits five U.S. agencies 

6 September 1954, page 30 
20 September 193-4, page 37 



Slll)jCt*t: Radio-tv operations in small and 
medium-sized advertising agencies 



Despite the trend toward agency mergers to adequately service 
radio and t\ advertising, Edward L. Bernays, public relations coun- 
sel, feels advantages of bigness in agencies are overrated. 

"Bigness," he asserted recently, "is equated with success in the 
American mind and becomes an agency's most powerful sales point." 
This automatic assumption is detrimental to a whole segment of 
American business and professional services, Bernays said. 

Bernavs described problems facing small- and medium-sized ad 
agencies and recommended solutions to them when he addressed the 
fourth annual dinner of the League of Advertising Agencies, held 
at New York's Advertising Club late last month. 

One "negative element" which smaller agencies suffer from, he 
said, is the altitude that "it is economically impossible for an ad- 
vertising agency doing less than $10 million to employ specialists 
in tv and radio production. ..." I In discussing the situation with 
SPONSOR, Bernays said: "Yet, the accounts which spend less than 
$100,000 a year need specialists even more than the larger corpora- 
tions because they're not equipped to handle these activities through 
their own advertising departments.") 

In order that smaller agencies could offer advertisers specialized 
skills in fields such as tv and radio. Bernays suggested that the 
League set up a central registry of free-lance specialized services to 
which members could turn when necessary to seek outside aid. 

Bernays praised the League's members (agencies range in size 
from one with a half-dozen employees to one with several hundred) 
for maintaining a personal, immediate approach to a client's prob- 
lems and products, an approach which, he declared, often was lack- 
ing in large organizations. He deplored bureaucratic tendencies be- 
coming more evident in business, saying, "When this happens the 
function becomes more important than the man." *•*-*■ 



SOCJ Weekend radio: Are you missing a 

good bet? 

I.SSHC: 14 June 1934, page 36 

Slllljeot: More and more sponsors are find- 
ing that weekend radio is a good 
advertising opportunity 



When CKWX, Vancouver, Canada, totaled up its books for 1954, 
it found business up considerably over 1953. Analyzing the reasons 
for the business upsurge, the station's accountants found one of the 
major factors was a large sale of "weekend packages." 

Macintosh MacDonald. planning & research director for the sta- 
tion, told sponsor the packages consist of 10, 20 or 25 announce- 
ments broadcast Saturdays and Sundays. 

"As a result of these special inducements at a very slight dis- 
count off the card rate, we were able not only to substantially in- 
crease the station's revenue but got very wonderful results for old 
advertisers and attracted a lot of worthwhile new advertisers as well. 

"On just one of these weekend packages," MacDonald disclosed. 
"Johnston Motor Co.. a Vancouver Plymouth dealer, sold 35 new 
cars in five da\s without any other advertising. And — to use the 
advertisers own words — it 'built up a wonderful list of prospects'." 

CKWX, says MacDonald, sees a substantial increase in weekend 
radio advertisers this year. * * * 





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HERBERT TAREYT0N CIGARETTES 



Write- Phone - or Wire 



Forjoe & Co. • Nat'l Rep. 



DAVE MORRIS at KE-2581 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



69 



f. Veie \(<ff ioii.v on ulr 



CITY 4 8TATE 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO. 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



ERP <kw) # 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*" 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

(0001 



PERMITEE «. MANAGER 



ntr 



JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. 



KRCG 



13 



13 Feb. 



104 660 



CBS 



LEXINGTON, Ky. 
PASCO, Wash. 



WLEX-TV 18 



KEPR-TV 19 



1 Mar.- 



1 Jan. 



1 630 



WLAP-TV^ 



10 910 ABC, CBDS, 

Du M, NBC* 



KIFA Jefferson Television Co. Hma-Bliir 

r,r/ * (Mrs.) Betty G. Handy, 
pres. & gen. mgr. 
Leonore R. Goshorn, v. p. 
Russell L. Rose, sec.-tres. 
(Applicant Identified with 
ownership of KWOS. 
Jeflerson City, and Jef- 
ferson City Capital 
News and Post Trib- 
une.) 

mca WLEX-TV. Inc. Forjee 

r,r ** J. D. Gay Jr.. pres. 

H. Guthrie Bell. sec. -tres. 

W. B. Gess. v.p. 

NFA Cascade Bcstg Co. Weed Tv 

'^ r A. W. Talbot, pres. 

Thomas S. Bostic. v.p. 

Frank E. Mitchell, v.p. 



ff. IMew construction permits* 



CITY & »TATE 



HILO, Hawaii 

JONESBORO, Ark. 
WAILUKU, Hawaii 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO. 



DATE OF 
GRANT 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



ERP (kw)' 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*" 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

1000) 



PERMITEE & MANAGER 



9- 



KBTM-TV 8 

3« 



19 Jon. 

12 Jan. 
19 Jan. 



ABC, CBS 



300 



12 200 

ABC, CBS' ; l'/j 5,960 



RADIt 
RIP1 



KIFA Hawaiian Bcstg. System Free & 

r,r *^ J. Howard Worrall, pres. Peters 

C. Richard Evans, v.p.- 



KIFA Regional Bcstg. Co. 
r,r ** Harold E. King & 

Helen W. King, partners 

KIFA Hawaiian Bcstg. System Free & 

J. Howard Worrall. pres. Peters 

C. Richard Evans, v.p.- 
gen. mgr. 



III. Y«*ir applied! ions 



CITY & STATE 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE 
FILED 



ERP (kw)" 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)"* 



ESTIMATED 
COST 



ESTIMATED 

1ST YEAR 

OP. EXPENSE 



TV STATIONS 
IN MARKET 



APPLICANT 



AM 
AFFILIATE 



WALLA WALLA, Wash. 5" 12 Jan. 



WALLA WALLA, Wash. 8^ 20 Jc 



l'/i 



WATERTOWN, S. D. 



13 Jan. 



100 



1,272 $136,626 $ 31,200 



6 $ 42,405 $ 25,000 



278 $345,137 $185,500 



KHQ. Inc. 

Richard O. Dunning. 

pres. 
William B. Hyde. see. 
Milton O. Fltsch. tres. 

Walla Walla Tv Co. 
Thomas C. Bostic. pres. 
J. B. Watkinson. v.p. 
Frank E. Mitchell, sec. 
tres. 



Tri-City Television Corp. KWAT 

F. L. Bramble, chmn. 

Jn'in W. Erhstrom. pres. 

Alan L. Austin, sec. 

Robert D. Lusk. v.p. 

Ross E. Case. v.p. 



U.S. stations on air, incl. 
Honolulu and tlaska (31 Jan. 
'55) 


127 
2."» 


UUA \j U II 1 

Post-freeze c.p.'s granted (ex- 
chilling 34 educational grants; 
26 Jan. '55) 
Grantees on air 


L 

.1861 
319 


Tv sets in U. S. (1 Dei . 

'54) .?2.*>»r;.noo§ 




Markets covered 


I tt.V',,5 



•Both new c.p.'a and nations going on the air listed here are. those which occurred between 
10 Jan and ::l Jan or on which Information could be obtained In thai perl I, Stations are 
considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. "KfTe^ltre radiated power. Aural 
power usually In one-half the visual power. •••Antenna height above average terrain (not 
above ground), tlnformatlon on the number of seta In markets where not designated as being 
from NBC Besearch. consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed approxi- 
mate. IData from NUC Besearch and Planning. Percentages based on homes with sets and 
homes In tv coverago areas arc considered approxlm;i .st cases, the representative of a 

radio station which Is granted a c.p. also represents the new tv operation. Since at preaetljne 
It Is generally too early to confirm tv representatives of most grantees. SPONSOR lists the 
reps of the radio stations In this column (when a radio station has been given the tv grant). 



\1'\ No fleures available at presstlme on sets In market, 

'This number Includes grants to permltees who have since surrendered their c. p.'s or who turn 

lind Hi' FCC STesI patter went on air 2!5 Jan irj 'Nol yet on air. 'Operates as 

satellite of KIMA TV, Yakima, duplicating KIMA TV programing which li vBC, CBS 

and NTiC programing. KEBP T\ and KIMA r\ mgle unit. To operate as 

satellite i.i.Mr. I KGMB IV programing which Includes MIC an I 

BS [COMB 11 li lulu, duplicating KfiMB-TV pro 

LBI CBS eratc a atcllltc of KHQ TV, Spo 

i EKJ n i to ol KIMA TV. Yakima, dupll 

KICA TV pi gramlne Ownership Identified with KIMA-TV, Yakima, an. I KKIIPTV. 

Pa 



70 



SPONSOR 



\ ^ 



Iw* 



i 


















„:«\*T» f r.* 







Even a line -Ai^-? 

won't "blow". . . on film! 

Another good reason why more and more advertisers are 
switching to film ! Then action is rehearsed. Should an 
actor "blow"a line— or have an accident like this— the 
scene can be re-shot. No red faces I No product kidded I 
Besides, it's easy, economical, to produce and 
co-ordinate showings when you USE EASTMAN FILM. 

For complete information write to: 

Motion Picture Film Department 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 



East Coast Division 
342 Madison Avenue 
New York 1 7, N. Y. 



Midwest Division 



West Coast Division 



1 37 North Wabash Avenue 6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 



Chicago 2, Illinois 



Hollywood 38, California 



or W. J. GERMAN, INC 



Professional Motion Picture Films 
Fort Lee, N. J,; Chicago, III.; Holl- 



Be sure to film your show IN COLOR. You'll be needing it . . . soon. 




w 





^"■^w 



WBZ+WBZA Boston, Springfield -51,000 Watts 

KYW -Philadelphia— 50,000 Watts 

KDKA -Pittsburgh— 50,000 Watts 

WOWO Fort Wayne— 50,000 Watts 

KEX— Portland— 50,000 Watts 

WBZ-TV Boston— Channel 4 

WPTZ (TV)— Philadelphia— Channel 3 

KDKA-TV- Pittsburgh— Channel 2 

KPIX (TV) -San Francisco — Channel 5 

WBC means sales . . . WBC means audience . . . WBC means audi- 
ence-action. Because WBC stations have the power and the people who 
know how to use that power to make listeners react. For rates and 
availabilities, contact Eldon Campbell, WBC National Sales Manager, 
PLaza 1-2700, New York. 

WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING CO., INC. 

KPIX represented by The Katz Agency, Inc. 
All other WBC stations represented by Free & Peters, Inc. 




\ J 





^>v 



w 






WBC means 




B C 



\Z"^ 




■ ->■- 





y 




Perfect balance . . . of skilled operating technicians, specially designed equipment, and 
constant laboratory research maintains Precision leadership in the field of film processing. 

Electronic Printing, for example, illustrates the results of Precision's continuing search for 
improved ivays to serve leading producers, directors, and cameramen. This important Maurer 
development in the printing of optical sound from magnetic original is installed at Precision 
for kinescope and other recording direct to the optical track. 



In everything there is one best . . . in film processing, it's 



recision. 



P R E C 



ION 



FILM LABORATORIES, INC 

21 WEST 46TH fe T R E E T . NEW YORKi 36. N Y 



jfi|P% 







A division of J. A. Maurer, Inc. 



74 



SPONSOR 



^Nighttime 7 February 1955 

SUNDAY I MONDAY 

Pu Ann World 
C.nnlBui IB . 1 " WH ', _^ 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 

TUESDAY I WED 



NESDAY THURSDA' 



Nighttime 7 February 1955 

FRIDAY I SATURDAY 





25 




110-MSBj L 33NT m.iv.f U 


"ubf'.'S. 


SbS'^JSj *i* 




Mr Peeper* Najna'a the 

63 'M Y .. . *• Bala too -Pgrlna 
13 vtka Id 1) kt __ 
(«•• ball Guild. Bihmi 
S««f> 111,000 * Beoflill (7500 


112.500 


BB4._I_nri22.500 


J=B 


CalBite-Palmoiiva Tv Readeri 
Carnally Hour Dimt 

, ColCUfl S*UdM. IL.-I'l K .1 

Bitoi tBO.OOO 
Secctarulan 


Burai A Allen 
E. * <■** beJi 

'■ "Jrl.-i: '!f„ 





KT m-t L 




r Tire Too* J Upton. 



RCA: K&EJ 



Danny ThMU 



ellw* Sludle S7 SpMtor 190,000 - — ~~ "77— "" '*" "3 9 

» H J Helm Co „ T — — ii!.,m 1 .1 Hllibiiry MHli 

Hilt L 2NT * B !*. H ° B * LAM fll.Jr eurne " ,,LS 30 ' 



I Shower of SUri 






II2.00J ,,„ _,,„ 



14500 



<l*rter t450O HuLtblM I1T_MI 



Swiitui fj] „_ (.„„_,, 

V4. H _t-irfcj No nelwor _ 5hw 

Jultt Umlinltt: p rot-ram Ini ™- *■ Remoldi 



*T 128.000 . 



BrMhar 1100. 000 



sorry ^»__ C 

B___r___i6,0l 



TMlfht 

IBtei. Allen 1 
11:30 pro-1 tffl 



) Standard Tin*. 



M»«U| ShM. new M-f 



Chic««o; H». Etollr»ood; KT, N«« Y ° 1) r * 1 l _^: 



,',-". 


TC 


DTK 

ITI*" 


T u 


b-b an 


1 ( 


,'. u 


shall- 




, Sal 


DPS 


NBC 


u . 




pm 



rijktr A: Tll.ltn 






p r-^H. Hit ir^mil lunir In l>Mli 1/if 
r In Iho Central UR* 00nUn«el*Il 

-1 am. are alio pan of NBC TV 



in., CM: CBS. Tb 3HS-4 



• WW !■■■■ n: l-i 13 pn 

or NBC W 10-10:30 pm ; 

VBC. Th BdO-s'pn; DOM: 

IBO Th 8-0 30 nm 
.in r. 'am: 'i"i 9 :30 10 rm 
: ABC, Sal 10:30-11 am 



Frawky Carp , n M. ■.:,«■ 

H T. French, IWT NIX.' V 

Gemei Corp., Iirtno ABC Si 

r «-» pm, yfcn nrc v 

flanoral Foarfi. TftB CDS, 



, Sun 1I-1MS f 



: KDC. Hi 0-9:80 i 



1:15-30 am; M- 



Sylvanla. JUT CHS. 











Ml.'. 










MIL-. 






























































-■-■ 


■'■■ 




>.D 






^^anotkCg^zYs;^ 



"Man, I remember when you told me about KATV's transmitter 
being jost 24 mi tod ... the same distance from 

the Battery to the Bronx . . but what's this LOOP business?" 

OOP to the 
LflJ INGTOli RA ■ 

5 with it." 

KA l V ton. 103,000 sets in the area as of 
, . . and growing all tht 

"Are there people a i 

"806,000 . . . nil coverage area,'' 

■ 
$653,091,000 year ago ... 

- buying income of $857^00,000." 

"It's a real erosji i 

"33rd in the nation, with its population . . , a REAL COOL deal 

for advi rtisers." 

'•Man, now you're exceedingly hep!" 



Gel hep in Axkrnii 
BRUCE B. COMPTON 
National Sales Mgr. 



■ 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 

National Rapt 



Channel 7 

Stud^s in Pine Bluff & Littlfj Rock 
John Fugote, Monoger 

620 Beech Street 
Little Rock. Arkansas 



^fteservtce^rifrTth^mos^suDScribe 

PULSE FOR DEPENDABILITY 

We've been yelling about this over and over — and 
still it's "news ". Please note that U.S. Pulse TV 
uses a minimum sample of 117,000 interviews 
monthly for each report. 



Minimum sample 
per network program 
is 6,000 completed 
family interviews! 

Regular Pulse subscribers pay the ridiculously low 
price of only $100 per month! For the invaluable 
ratings data, full audience composition, total 
families, special films section, etc. — quick delivery, 
so you can act fast on the data, while the informa- 
tion is still news! 



This month throughout the U.S., 117,000 homes are 
being interviewed for next month's "U.S. Pulse TV" 



Pa y time 7 February 1955 TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS Da y tlme 7 February 1955 

SUNDAY I MONDAY I TUESDAY I WEDNESDAY I THURSDAY I FRIDAY I SATURDAY 



> Minor* tt hr III 









Dim Dang Schl 
Muihatlan Soi[> 
BBtVW 




P&O: BB&T 


;.,../,, . , 


1030 '^hrillW 



U-l.stiMlT. W R 
SU'i. BBDO 



Whtrrv. BiJ.it 



C -£V l.SS W 7 T 0NT 111S 'V 



,„„ J^i.i H»klu 



jelmirti ^^ W«tk 




(; 



P 

^ AND URBAN COVERAGE 



PULSE, Inc., 15 West 46th St., New York 36 
Telephone: Judson 6-3316 



'INTERVICW 

U tic 

H0M, 



sno-43 mi 
Knw- 1 hr 

B'lnh'r* 111. 

(roHrnne Prodi: 

Sntr ' HO.oOO 


m-J SI Orw M»n't Fml-j 
NY mop L S*niUo Co 

kUw iio.och 


titer Vii .in i. 

BIB IBSOO 

lOCb L 
* hr MM0 

So «!"'* Orr * 110.000 
Br ° r ra*T " World «l 

NT L 



Cotrt(»-P«l'nol | « 

■ p ill .in-. 
flryin Htuitfn 



JMNT L 



Coltilf-f^lMioUr. 



l-mlo 0*nlr 

,**ui ttm 



Am Hnoir Prodi - 

iin.il ."". ..".'■"" 



."•„ — 




T0H» L 
CaftpMII-Mlthiin 

■rl inter On 




,:f~,°% 


TBA 


t-r..r.r«i..!t.( 


IHBWU Co 

Br>u*Hw*tMi 


NT lu.lh L 

p*n (Mr pr«l 

Brntor. A Btwlu 


Pink* t« 

It* Dl f 1. 


a^ta 






ITNt"' * '»L 

Jthf 



W»y »t tho Worm Andy I 



Bud Mr WOO 1 







twAui (woo 




Burwtt WOO 


lui un. 


proinmlm 


TtnnnM* Emit 

F«rd Stirw 
Bj m-t 1 


NO DMWOTft 

i .-■M.ln« 


Th. Bli Tm 

Nminnil Tltlrj 

Prodi ■■■".'-; 

i.-p dilry prod* 

eiPbii. i. 

Mr II4.MM 


,. „( III- 


T "" m '"" 


F«tttr YW 

Nul 

Colnir-PilmollT. 
.]( d 11:30-45 

EttJ 


: i^i: 













«"; "•■■- 



TBA BuLtfb-lH 








D *£GON 



• EVG6NE 



You get the whole 

30-COUNTY 



mk 



-} 



KOIN-TV 










When you buy a market you want the complete 
melon — not just a slice or two. That's why adver- 
tisers are choosing KOIN-TV, Portland Oregon's 
only VHF station . . . Portland's only maximum 
power station. 

The giant KOIN-TV tower, 1530 feet above 
average terrain, plus maximum power of 100,000 
watts on Channel 6 blankets over 35,000 square 
miles in the prosperous Pacific Northwest. 
KOIN-TV delivers a consistent picture as far as 
150 miles from Portland . . . reaching 30 Oregon 
and Southern Washington counties. No other 
advertising buy in the area can duplicate this 
sales coverage. Write, wire or phone us for 
complete availabilities. 




KOIN-TV 



PORTLAND, OREGON 



CHANNEL 6 

Represented Nationally by 
CBS Television Spot Sales 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



81 



CREDIT CLOTHING 



SPONSOR: Union Clothing Stores M.I NCY: D 

' \r-' -I HISTORY : A retail credit clothing, 

store miner has discovered that he can use a radio show 
to build store traffic immediately, lie sponsored a quiz 
program, in Spanish, which offered listeners small dis- 
counts on purchases for the correct answers instead of 
prizes. Three fire-minute announcements at 11 a.m. on 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday for one week brought 
1 1<> customers into the store with the correct answer. 
The cost per show was $8.65 or a total of $25.95. 



Kl OR, San Antonio 



PROGRAM: Announcements 




results 



ml 



TV and RADIO 



SPONSOR: Hill T\ and Radio 



AGENCY: Direct 



I VPSULI I W HISTORY: A man who was inclined to 
doit />! tliat radio had am listeners at night — he's installed 
more tv sets than any other merchant in Hamilton — dis- 
coi-ered that nighttime radio greatly increased his sales, 
lie moral $15,000 in merchandise in a three-day period 
following an offer on a two-hour request slum . Announce- 
ments were made on the 8:30-10:30 p.m. program that 
lieu i loi I, radios, rained at $69.95, would be sold for $30 
with the trade-in of any old clock. Two days later 115 
clock radios had been sold and at least 25 customers 
turned away because the supply was exhausted. Thirty- 
one ti sets were also sold as a result of the traffic. The 

east uj each program it as S22.~>. 



CII.MI.. Hamilton, Ontario 



PROGB \M: Two-hour 
All Request Shau 



HOMES 






SPONSOR: John F. Long, Home Builder AGENCY: Al P*, 

' VPSULE ( VSE HISTORY: Saturation announcements 
on five Phoenix radio stations, along with some tv and 
newspaper ads sold 225 homes in six weeks for Buildtr 
John F. Long. The competition in this area is keen, ast 
great number of housing projects are being built simul- 
taneously. John F. Long is convinced that the radio cam- 
paign, which costs approximately $4,000 a month, plays a 
large part in popularizing his Mary vale Terrace homes. 
The schedule is for six months. 



kPIIO. KOY, KOOL, KR1Z. KR1 X. 
Phoenix, \ii/ona 



PROGRA1 

Announcement! 



REFRIGERATORS 



SPONSOR: Goodyear Service Stores AGENCY: Dint* 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Three Goodyear Service 
Stores used radio to announce the fact that they acre giv- 
ing away turkeys with every purchase of a GE Refrigera- 
tor. Morning and evening announcements Mondm 
through Saturday in one week cost $450. After all tht 
turkeys were sold out, hams were given with the refrig- 
erators and after all the refrigerators were gone. CI 
Ranges were pushed. In that week the sponsor took in 
$26,000 and believes much of it was due to the radio 
announcements. 



W Mil.. Miami 



PROGRAM: Gospel Train "Cracker Jim" 



DRY CLEANERS 



SPONSOR: Baxter Careful AGENCY: DireJ 

I.aunderers & Dry Cleanei- 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Before opening a new drive 
in laundry and dry cleaning store, the company arranged 
for radio announcements. Lewis A. Sperry, Division Man- 
ager of the Company, reports: "/ have never before heard 
the response we got from that advertising. Over 50 pea 
pie mentioned to us that they heard the advertising on 
If KBZ and many of them said they brought work in to 
try us because of it. . . . While the number 50 isn't a 
large amount, it is significant to me because I know that 
many others come in who didn't mention the radio adveii 
tising. but who must have been influenced by it. We are 
sure it did help, heeau.se out sales reports show it." The 
campaign lasted nine days and cost $170. 

WKBZ, Muskegon, Mich. PROGRXM: Aim. mm,,, 



PUMPS 



GROCERY STORE 



SPONSOR: Fairbanks, Morsi & I o. M.l \< 5 : The Buchen Co. 

CAPSULI CASI HISTORY: At 9 o'clock the morning o) 

a flood in Chicago, the company called the station to place 
as many station break announcements as possible i<> in- 
form the public that sump pumps, de-watering pumps. 
electru maims and emergency generating sets were avail- 
able. Some I" announcements went on the air — the first 
at II a.m. and the last ai 10:48 p.m. On that day alone 

375 sump pumps rC n pine jioni $65 tO $] 10 inie 

sold as ii dl iis every de-watering pump in stock at double 
that price. Sales continue to be made as n result of con- 
tacts made all that day 



SPONSOR: Lewis Jones Grocer) M.I NCY: Direcl 

I \IMII < VS1 HISTORY: This grocery launched a se\ 

Hes of announcements on II I) Iks Cuz/.in \l Show M 

June. It mis so successful that by October Lewis Junes 
decided to expand his advertising, bought a schedule com 

sisting of an limn and 20 minutes of solid lime on Sal- 

urday mornings for the Lewis Jones Open House shoun 

Iftei the first broadcast, business rose $500 above prei 

vious Saturdays; by the third »<•<■/,. // mis up Sl.lOH. 

Since June, reports Jones. Ins over-all sales hare in- 

i reused >"', . His Saturday radio slum costs $60 a 



\\ D VK, I olumbu Ga 



WGN, < hicago 



PROGR Wl: Station breaks 



PRl IGR \M : Announcements 
I a u i- Jones < )pen Hou-e 




It won't help you... if it's not available 



Oft-quoted high ratings frequently turn out to be nothing 
but window dressing. . . they're just not available to YOU. 

So when you shop for radio time in Los Angeles or San 
Francisco, be sure you get the real merchandise . . . consis- 
tently good ratings that ARE available to do a selling job for 
YOU ... on KHJ and KFRC. 

Compare specific ratings . . . not averages ... of availabil- 
ities on KHJ and KFRC against the field. Compare the low, 
low day/night rates of Don Lee's key stations that deliver 
these- two wealthy markets at lower cost per thousand. 

hi And remember ... audiences on KHJ and KFRC are 
tuned for thoughtful listening, not just a muted background. 
They hear your message and they respond . . . with sales. 

You might buy bigger ... at a price! . . . but you can't buy 
better than the low cost-per-thousand of KHJ Los Angeles 
and KFRC San Francisco. Ask your Don Lee or H-R Repre- 
sentative for specifics. 



Represented Nationally by 



H-R 




REPRESENTATIVES, Inc 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



83 



"Solid as a Storer Station" is 
a compliment applied only to a station whose 

solid foundation in the community it serves is 
exceeded only by solid selling on the air. 

For a sales campaign that is successful, satisfactory 
and solid — sell on a Storer Station. 






STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 



WSPD • WSPD-TV 

Toledo, Ohio 

WJW • WXEL-TV 
Cleveland, Ohio 



KPTV 

Portland, Ore. 

WBRC • WBRC-TV 
Birmingham, Ala. 



WAGA • WAGA-TV 
Atlanta, Ga. 

WWVA 

Wheeling, W. Va- 



WJBK • WJBK-TV 
Detroit, Mich. 

""GBS -WGBS-TV 
Miami, Fla. 



NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Sales Mgr. 

11 8 E. 57th St., New York 22, ELdorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 , Franklin 2-6498 



TO SELL 
JACKSONVILLE 

(and the rich Northeast 
Florida market . . .) 




WJHP-TV 

Channel 36 

§ § § 

76,500 UHF SETS-IN-USE 

§ § § 

ABC • NBC • DuMONT 
Television Networks 

§ § § 

For rates, availabilities, and oth- 
er information, call Jacksonville 
EX 8-9751 or New York MU 
7-5047. 

§ § § 

WJHP-TV 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

276,000 watts 

on Channel 36 

Represented nationally by 
John 11. Perry Associates 




agency profile 



Lansing B. Lindquist 

Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
V.p. in charge of radio-tv 



Lansing Lindquist, Ketchum, MacLeod \ Grove's v.p. in charge 
<>l radio-tv, sa\s he work* "in I lie wood*. 1>\ Madison Ave. stand- 
ards."' To service his air media accounts, Lindquisl has to go to 
New York about twice a month for a couple ol days. 

'"It's a choice of commuting to \c\\ Vhk oi commuting to I'itl-- 
burgh," sa\s lie. "It seems to management here that it is far more 
important that \\c lie immediatclv accessible to clients, to understand 
their problems and needs, to serve them on their own ground as it H 
a complete agency, not just a branch office. 

"In the second place, my perspective is better here. 1 think, than 
in New York. We ma) not get the information quite as quickly, but 
we can digesl it better. Actually, I have so main friends at all the 
networks who are s\ mpathetic to my 'in-the-woods' statu- that I 
probabl) gel some fads on new availabilities and ideas as quickl) 
as anybody on the Street." 

Lindquist directs air advertising of the agenc\ - 50 or more ac- 
couhts, including nationals like \\ estinghou-e: regional air users 
like the Chevrolet dealers of the Pittsburgh. Harrisburg, Baltimore, 
Richmond and Buffalo zones; Re\mer"s Blend la soil drink); 
Scaliest : I'.i ami Baking ( 0. 

In 1952, the agenc) boughl political convention coverage for 
\\ cslintmouse. "I would sa) the conventions were the greatest radio 
and t\ buj in the historv of the media. It had prestige value, ad- 
vertising value and an amazing cost-per- 1,000." 

Lindquisl makes it a poinl to stud) all new radio and i\ develop- 
ments. ""I{ii:lil now. were ac|i\el\ studxin^ color, particularl) coloi 
film, since mosi national spot and local advertisers will have to be on 
film Eoi a while, il the) use color. \- Foi coloi sets, I have to pull 
a Will Rogers on you all I know i- wli.it I read in sponsor. More 
to the point. 1 doubt that color t\ will be a revolution." 

Despite tin- growth ol i\ activit) in hi> agency, Lindquisl has re- 
mained a final radio Ian. 

"Part reason, 1 guess, is that I mel m) w i I .- through radio. Mr-. 
Lindquisl was in radio as traffic manager ol The turn Hour. She 
routed me throughout the countrj during the wai years to cover a 
different spol each week Eoi The Irmj Hour. I was so impressed 
with her knowledge of schedules and routings thai I decided to take 
her out of circulation as soon as possible." -*• + • 



86 



SPONSOR 




"WE HAVE THE FEELING WE'RE 
BEING WATCHED!" 



_l_ HIS is not just our imagination. First, 
WD AY-TV is the only TV station in Fargo 
... in fact, the only station in the whole of 
this rich Red River Valley! The nearest sta- 
tion is 50 miles away . . . the next one, 185! 

Second, folks around here own TV sets. 
In Fargo, set saturation is 70.5% ... 20 
miles out it's 57% . . . and 50 miles out 
it's 33%. 



Third, WDAY-TV keeps those sets turned 
on with 57 audience-proved local programs 
and 60 of the best shows from NBC and 
ABC . . . including many live shows, both 
network and local. 

Yep, we're being watched all right . . . 
and we love it ! Get the facts from 
Free & Peters. 




WDAY-TV 

FARGO, N. D. • CHANNEL 6 

Affiliated with NBC • ABC 

FREF & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



87 




ooo 



a iorum on quest ions of current interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



Cun there be peaeeful co-existence between 
subscription ir ami eommereial video 




THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

TOLL TV TO BENEFIT INDUSTRY 

By Arthur Levey 
President, Skiatron Electronics & Tv 

Carp., TV. 1 . 

There is no doubt 
whatever that 
commercial and 
subset iption tele- 
\isiini can and 
will live together 
peacefully, cacli 
functioning to the 
nth e r's advan- 
tage, each per- 
forming a vital service lor both the 
industrv and the public. 

\- 1 see it co-existence is almost too 
weak a term for television's future 
"new look." Commercial and toll tv 
will be wedded together by the strong- 
est bonds of economic necessity. Thei] 
composite will spell out a greater in- 
dustr) and. from the point of view of 
entertainment offered, a better one. 
There will be no friction for these 
reasons: 

1. Subscription tv is conceived as a 
"supplementary" service to regular 

commercial television, and would give 
it a tremendous and much-needed shol 
in the arm. It will result in better pro- 
grams, a wider, more satisfied audi- 
ence and a -'Hinder economic base Foi 
the eniiie industi y. It due-, nut mean 
it could not mean an end to lo- 
ll, iv 's "free" telev ision service. 

2. I'ee-iv w ill be a boon to toda) '- 
1. 1 ...i.l' ,i-i. i -. besel a- the) are w iih 
pi oblems ..I prog raming and ol mount- 
ing costs. It will benefit the uhf sta- 
tions mosl of all. hut that's no! the 
w hole story. 

Once the box office in the home is 



operating, the vhf operators, too, will 
find their position vastly improved as 
their stations draw on a new source of 
revenue. This, in turn, will spell out 
benefits for the advertisers, for the rate 
cards are going to come down. Some 
far-sighted men in the ad industry 
have already recognized this. 

Talk all you will about the benefits 
of toll tv to the industry, the winner 
— in the long run — is still going to be 
the public. A whole new vista of en- 
tertainment will open up for it — with- 
out interruption for commercials and 
at reasonable prices. 

SPORTS: FREE TV AIDS FEE 

By Ned Irish 

Executive Vice President 
Madison Square Garden Corp.. IS. Y. 

For a good manv 
years Madison 
Square Garden 
has been consid- 
ering the possi- 
bilitv <>f subscrip- 
tion television. In 
our opinion, sub- 
scription televi- 
sion of our event- 
without lice home television of some 
portion oi our program would not be 
successful. It therefore seems to us 
thai It will be nccessarv for us to tele- 
vise a good portion of our events un- 
der the same home television program 
that now exists in order to develop 

and maintain a g I markel foi those 

majoi events which will be more read- 
ilv adaptable to subscription television. 
\\ e b.i\ e found this complementary 
use of telev ision to be extremel) prac- 
tical in our boxing programs which 
now find most of the outdoor major 
fights on theatre iele\ ision. 





I bat it will I 



FEE TV: $10 BILLION GATE? 

By Sidney W. Dean, Jr. 
Vice President. McCann-Erickson, IS. Y. 

"Pay as you 

look" television 
can peacefully 
and cooperative- 
ly co - exist with 
advertiser- 
financed tv — if 
its development 
takes two direc- 
tions: 
ave its ov\ n exclu- 
sive stations in each market, over and 
above three or four commercial sta- 
tions. This situation, which we hope 
the FCC can ultimately work out. will 
give pay tv the opportunity to serve 
the "missing audience"' — the 50% of 
the homes whose sets are not in use, 
even in the evening hours. 

2. That it will develop its own pro- 
graming for profit from the main 
types of able-to-pay but more selective 
audiences for cultural interests, adult 
and extension education, and special 
events. An audience rating ol only 3% 
at 2r><£ per home still represents a gross 
revenue of $250,000. 

The income potential for pav televi- 
sion i- much greater than we realize. 
Americans are now paving better than 
$15 billion for all forms of recrea- 
tional, private educational, religious, 
and welfare ailiv ities. 

V.9 much as Sl billion could now be 
served bv "fee tv systems, and the 
flexibility ol the box office in the home 
might lift the potential to a- much as 
s|() billion in a leu years. I his com- 
pares wiili commercial tv - $] billion 
income from time and program sales. 
I In- new source of income should be 
a majoi stimulant to creative tv . 



SPONSOR 




FEE TV WILL LOWER AD COSTS 

By Millard C. Fought 
Economic Consultant, N. Y. 

The addition of 
subscription pro- 
gram service to 
regular telev i-i<>n 
will prove as 
{ireal a boon, if 
not a greater one. 
to broadcasters 
and advertisers as 
is the subscrip- 
tion revenue of newspapers and peri- 
odicals to publishers and advertisers. 
The dual source of revenue will 
make mam more stations economi- 
callv possible, hence giving advertis- 
ers (especiallv smaller ones) more 
station and time access to more flex- 
ible l\ coverage of a larger audience. 
I believe the average viewing familv 
will buy perhaps one fee program for 
every 10 or more sponsored programs 
watched. However, the extensive new 
revenue will greatly relieve advertising 
of its now heavy burden of carrying 
all of tv s high costs, yet give the 
sponsors a 90% shot at bigger audi- 
ences via more stations at lower costs. 
With its own home box office, tele- 
vision will finally have the economic 
answer to its severest current prob- 
lems, among them how to telecast the 
costliest of spectator sports, top qual- 
ity movies, Broadway plays, opera and 
the like. Moreover, the added revenue 
will help tv solve another costly prob- 
lem — how to pay for color tv. 

Today, advertisers are trying to 
pick up the new giant — tv — by their 
own economic bootstraps alone. But 
when tv becomes a marketing device 
itself, and acquires a direct economic 
revenue of its own, advertising will 
get its turn at some comfortable, thrif- 
ty, profitable piggy-back riding. 

YOU CANT LOSE THE SPONSOR 

By William B. Templelon 

r'.P. and Director of Radio & Tv 

Bryan Houston Inc.. IS. Y. 

I don't believe 

that fee tv can be 
as successful as 
i t s proponents 
think it will be. 
Subscription tv 
is an attempt to 
create a box of- 
fice for tv and. 
for a fee, to sup- 
[Please turn to j>age 112 I 

7 FEBRUARY 1955 



you Get a Heck of a Big Plus... 




\Mm YW Buy WIOD fi 




COUNTY 
MARKET 



Make no mistake about it — 
WIOD's four key counties — Dade, 
Broward, Palm Beach and Monroe- 
give you Dixie's newest and fastest 
growing key market. And, when you 
get in it via WIOD, you grab off a 
good plus in the six bordering counties. 

gs are moving down here, and 
— and WIOD will help you move your 
too! Come on, get in — call your 

bery man for facts. 



James M. LeGate, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC Affiliate M| am,, Fl 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Co. 




OHioa 



you're right 

on vuel 

No need to fluff your lines. There's 
only one CUE to follow when your 
stage is set in Akron. Why, they 
love us in our own home town (see 
our Hooper) . . . one CUE from 
us and they'll love you, too. 

more MUSIC 
more NEWS 
more OFTEN 

Wcue 

Akron s only independent .we're home folks 
Tim Elliot, / 



John E. Pearson Co., National Representatives 
after February 10, 1955 




.... .*•..!..*.>■. • -> »- 



. ' 



89 



V 



-£ 



■^ 







HESE ARE THE STATION 



NATIONAL SPC 




.Free & Jfete 

^ INC. 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 



NEW YORK 

444 Madison Ave. 

Plaza 1-2700 



CHICAGO 

230 N. Michigan Ave. 
Franklin 2-6373 



DETROIT 

Penobscot Bldg. 

Woodward 1-42 55 



ATLANTA 

Glenn Blc/g. 
Main 5667 



FT. WORTH 

406 W. Seventh St. 
Fortune 3349 



HOLLYWOOD 

6331 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood 9-2151 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Rz/ss Building 
Sutter 1-3798 




)R YOUR 



ELEVISION CAMPAIGN 



EASTERN 


VHF 


CHANNEL 


PRIMARY 


WBZ-TV 


Boston 


4 


NBC 


WPIX 


New York 


11 


IND 


WPTZ 


Philadelphia 


3 


NBC 


WCSC-TV 


Charleston, S. C. 


5 


CBS 


WIS-TV 


Columbia, S. C. 


10 


NBC 


WTVJ 


Miami 


4 


CBS 


CENTRAL 








WHO-TV 


Des Moines 


13 


NBC 


WOC-TV 


Davenport 


6 


NBC 


WDSM-TV 


Duluth — Superior 


6 


CBS 


WDAY-TV 


Fargo 


6 


NBC 


WCCO-TV 


Minneapolis — St. Paul 


4 


CBS 


KMBC-TV 


Kansas City 


9 


CBS 


WBAP-TV 


Fort Worth — Dallas 


5 


ABC-NBC 


KFDM-TV 


Beaumont 


6 CP 


CBS 


KENS-TV 


San Antonio 


5 


CBS 


WESTERN 








KBOI 


Boise — Meridian 


2 


CBS 


KBTV 


Denver 


9 


ABC 


KGMB-TV 


Honolulu 


9 


CBS 


KRON-TV 


San Francisco 


4 


NBC 




' 2 

When She Talks... 

They Listen 

NINA WRIGHT 

Packs her daily morning program with a wealth ol 
information, helplul to both urban and rural house- 
wives. Broadcast from her kitchen, Nina places 
major emphasis on the important subject of food. 
In addition, she lrcqucntly discusses other subjects 
of vital importance to women— fashion, good 
grooming, current events and civic affairs. Guest 
interviews are often a part ot her interesting pro- 
grams. 




Several times each month. Nina Wright is invited 
to appear as featured speaker at area functions, or 
to give homemaking and cooking demonstrations. 
In towns and cities throughout KM )()'s <S0-< ounty 
Coverage Area this past summer, the average 
attendance at .1 Nina VV right appearance was 24% 
of the total population. "I he only publicity used to 
attract housewives to these events were announce- 
ments in the NINA \\ RIGHT SHOW itself. Yes, 
when Nina Wright talks, homemakers listen. And 
•a hen N ina VI right sells \ our product, homemakers 
HI V! This popular Ks(H) "Personality Slmu 
draws listeners at a low cost per thousand ot 

approximately ' 1 3 cents. 

' based on Nielsen Coverage Service figures 

NINA WRIGHT SHOW 

10:25 A.M. — Mon. thru Fri. 

roryp 

4* Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Nationally Clear Channel 1 140 KC 
ABC Radio Affiliate 

10,000 WATTS DAYTIME 
5,000 WATTS NIGHTTIME 

Represented Nationally by Avcry-Knodel, Inc. 







I Continual from pai^e II 1 

to youngsters (even at 7 p.m. Sundays). The) probabl) can- 
no! fathom the clothes and the stilted (b) present-day stand- 
ards) relation of the youngsters to their parents. The show's 
nostalgia i- losl on all hut a feu oldsters, Tin afraid. And its 
main character blustering Father — ma\ strike today's crop 
ol people merel) a- loud-mouthed and ill-natured, rather than 
the delightful character that Clarence Day, Jr.. original!) 
intended. 

In the all-important area ol commercial copy, ready iden- 
tification often plays a vital role. If you are showing your 
product being eaten or driven or applied or worn, it"- entirely 
possible that your besl appeal is to cast these commercials 
with people who can provide identification — housewives who 
look and speak sufficient!) like houses ives to convince ( rather 
than young ladies recently released by the West port Play- 
house) ; damsels who appear at ease in kitchen or super 
market. Casting as well as direction can make or break the 
cop) lor. il you create unbelievable people, whatever they do 
or sa) can only he unconvincing. Television with it- relent- 
lessly prying and shamelessly revealing eye can magnif) the 
phone) to such a degree thai even the most uncritical viewer 
will turn away, if not in disgust, certainly in disbelief. 

II your cop\ calls lor an authority to do the -ale- pitch, he 
or -he had better look and sound authoritative. The words 
had better fit. the gestures he easy and relevant, the eyes and 
mouth convincing. II not. von more than destro) whatever 
concept vim had in mind: you sel yourseli hack. 

And be most careful ol animation. I se it correctly — or 
avoid it. Combine it with live action (realism) il necessar) 
unless il can rely solely on its sound track to gain identifica- 
tion. Hv the symbolizing ol a situation and the drawing of 
people, von have taken lad- and set them into lancv: you 
have replaced reality with fantasy. And with fantasy in copy 
as in drama, it i- far harder to huild a high Identification 
Quotient. • • * 



1 a' tiers to 


Boh 


1 


oretnan 


are 


welcomed 


Do you always 


agree 


n i 


ill the op 


moils 


Bob Foreman c\- 


l>/c\sc. in " tgenc) 


IdL 


lbs 


Y" Bob and the 


editors o) 


SPONSOR 


lion !</ 1 e Ihii>i>\ t< 


receive 


and print 


comments tiom 


readers. 


Iddress H<>l> Foreman, < 


/o 


SPONSOR, 


to /•:. 


I" St. 





92 



SPONSOR 




ONLY A COMBINATION OF STATIONS 
CAN COVER GEORGIA'S MAJOR MARKETS 



THE 
GEORGIA 



The TRIO offers advertisers at one low cost: 

• Concentrated Coverage 

• Merchandising Assistance 

• Listener Loyalty Built By Local Programming 

• Dealer Loyalties 

IN 3 MAJOR MARKETS 



represented individually and as a group by 

THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO 'DETROIT .ATLANTA' DALLAS • KANSAS CITY • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



93 




GOOD . . . advertising 
f always pays in the w 

f I'/ /, : /| I: \ \\\ \\}. 



RICH, GROWING 

NORTH CAROLINA 

MARKET 



b t I I t It . . . coverage 
than ever before is yours with 
RADIO in the 



15-county 

Winston-Salem 

NORTH CAROLINA 



Market 



BEST 



. . . buy morning, 



afternoon and evening is 




Represented by 

HEADLEY-REED CO. 




(Continued from pane 28) 

philosophy, as stated to me l>\ it~ top people, is that they do 
not see how they can represent talent I producers, director-. 
writers, performers) on the one hand, and he the employers 
of such talent on the other. This seeming paradox apparently 
troubles MCA not at all. 

Mergers and combines between producers and distributors, 
producers and producers and distributors and distributors 
are the older of the day. This last is merely another symp- 
tom of this struggle for survival which i- taking place in the 
field. And the struggle has created what is probably one of 
the most unstable pricing situations existing anywhere in tele- 
vision. Some producers and/or distributors, laced with heavy 
investments in product, running out of cash and the sources 
tor replenishing the exchequer, are reaching the point of 
desperation. 

It is becoming increasingly common for such an operator 
to go into a market and sell his product at what from an\ 
sound business standpoint must be considered a ridiculousl) 
low price. This has a tendency to. and often does, tear down 
the over-all price structure in a market. Probabl) no other 
phase of the broadcasting picture has seen the price structure 
in one or more markets change as drastically and as quickly 
as frequently happens in Iv film. On a given Monda\ morn- 
ing the going rate for a half-hour show of a certain type and 
caliber in a given market ma\ be $300, and within the span 
of a week that price may he dragged down to as little as $200. 

Healthy or not, this situation exists and inevitably must 
continue for some time. Our crystal ball sends us the nut- 
shell message that 1955-'56 is the period in the tv film busi- 
ness which will see the youngsters separated from the adults. 

It suggests, too, thai the entire development of the t\ film 
indristr\ max be doing telex ision generally an immeasurably 
important and long-lasting service. For the verv nature ol 
the competition is forcing t\ film distributors and producers 
to go out into the bushes and hunt up everj la-t conceivable 
advertising prospect. This j» resulting in an increasingly 
Stead) and heartening (low ol new advertisers, funis u ( 1( , daxe 
never before used television. And this must, inevitably, be ol 
great benefit to the industr) at large. 

From the standpoinl ol these, and established television 
advertisers, ol course, the fierce competition in t\ film is a 
blessing, too. For the) are being offered more and better 
shows at more and more economical prices than the) have 
before. * * * 



ever enjoyed 



9\ 



SPONSOR 



UIERD 



ATLANTA'S TOP INDEPENDENT 
MOVES GOODS FAST IN THIS 
$100 MILLION MARKET 



The WERD listening audience 

predominantly made up of the 

290,000 Negroes in the WERD 

coverage area, is responsive, 

loyal and partial to the 

specially-designed programming 

of this Negro-owned and managed 

1000-watt outlet 

More and more national 

advertisers are discovering 

that the magic formula for top 

sales in one of America's 

top markets is 



UIERD 



AMERICA'S FIRST NEGRO- 
OWNED RADIO STATION 

860 kc 1,000 watts 

Kadio Division — Interstate United Newspaper, Inc. 

Represented Nationally By JOE WOOTTON 

J. B. BLAYTON. JR.. General Manager 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



95 




Testing yrountl for commercials: JWT's Ch. 3 tv 'station' 



A new tool for more effective tele- 
vision advertising was demonstrated 
recentlj by J. Walter Thompson Co. 
in New York. It's a completely 
equipped television studio located 



siderable saving in time and money. 

"W hen a live commercial is being 
created," Wallace W. Elton, v. p. and 
art director, explained, "we can watch 
its actual development, see what the 



about two blocks from the company's commercial will look like before incur- 

main offices. What makes the venture ring costs of final production and can 

unusual is that the tv studio, equipped see auditions of talent or pilot films 

for live and film telecasting, transmits under actual broadcast conditions, 

commercials on a closed circuit to the Without waste of expensive produc- 

agenev offices over co-ax cable. They're tion, flaws can be eliminated and ini- 

picked up on television sets scattered mediate recommendations can be 

around J. Walter Thompson offices, all made. Good ideas are made better and 

tuned to Private Channel 3. the end result is a higher standard of 

The new studio, called the J. Walter quality at a saving of time and man- 

Thompson Workshop, is the result of ey." 



One recent example of the Work- 
shop's use, said Elton, was the devel- 
opment of commercials for Scotkins, a 
paper napkin product of the Soli 



a year's planning and research. It's be- 
ing used to test and demonstrate com- 
mercials for Pond's, Eastman Kodak. 
Lever Brothers, Scott Paper Co.. 
French's mustard. P. Ballantine and Paper Co. The picture shows a test 
others. Bart McHugh, v. p. and mem- Scotkin commercial, one of more than 
ber of the JWT tv department, said 25 experiments conducted b\ the 
that not only are more effective com- Workshop to develop the most dramat- 
ineicials developed through use of the ic way of demonstrating the strength 
Workshop but also that there is a con- of the napkins. * * * 

After 25 experiments, JWT devises commercial: Wet Scotkin holds apple, competitor's doesn't 




Advertest survey shows 
radio popular in tv homes 

Music and new- appear to be the 
biggest drawing cards for radio. That's 
one o| the basic findings of an Adver- 
test Survej of radio listening in tele- 
vision homes. 

Results of the survey were released 
I iv W NEW . New York, which was one 
of the participants in the studv. The 
study is one of a series of monthly sur- 
veys on television viewing made by 
Vdvertest and subscribed to bv six 
New ^ oik tv stations and major adver- 
tising agencies. WNEW participated 
in the survey because it involved radio 
listening. 

Highlights from the studv include 
the lollovv ing findings: 

• There are an average of 1.92 radio 
sets in working order per average tv 
home: 39.5* , of the respondents had 
one radio in working order, 33.6% 
had two. 18.1 % three. 3.2% four, 
3.2% five or more and only 2.4'// re- 
ported no radios in working order. 

• More than 12' '< of the respondents 
spent more time listening to the radio 
in 1954 as compared with 1953. 

• Main reasons given for increased 
radio listening: 2').!!'. said it was be- 
cause of radio's music, 24.4% said 
thev could listen while doing other 
things. 

• More than 55' '< of the respondents 
had cars equipped with radio; 41.1% 
said that when riding in the car, the 
radio was "always on," 43.5'J said 
it was "frequentlv on." 

• Nearlj 5!!', said there were radio 
programs that they listened to regular- 
ly. Ranking first— with 13.9', of the 
respondents naming it — was WNEWs 
Wale Believe Hall room. * ■* * 



.Vftisircif jinr/f<> promotion 
yets city-wide response 

For anyone who may still wonder 
about the impact of musical commer- 
cials on radio stations, WIKK. Erie, 

and Coldswan Productions. New ^ oik. 

oiler ibis tale: 

bate October Texas Jim lluilev. 

who s in.c. ol a W ("-tern program on 
W IK.K. wrote to Bryan Houston. Inc., 
that the agency's Western-style musi- 
cal for Nescafe was "almost the Num- 
ber One song" in Erie. He said it 
"was the first time in live years that 
I ve rei lived requests from listeners to 
plav a commercial." 

lluilev wenl on to sav thai he was 
running a contest as to the i dent it} of 



95 



SPONSOR 



the singer in the commercial — and that 
a local theatre was going to give free 
tickets to the winner. "So that's my 
problem," Hurley concluded. "Please 
tell me the name of the singer who re- 
corded the jingle for you so I can end 
the contest." 

Jules Bundgus, radio-tv business 
manager for the agency, contacted 
Goldswan Productions, Inc., producers 
of the Nescafe musical commercial se- 
ries, for the singer's name. Goldswan 
enlisted the cooperation of RCA Vic- 
tor, for whom the mystery singer — 
Bernie Knee — recorded as a member 
of the Smith Brothers Quartet. RCA 
Victor (Label X division I . in turn, 
sent to Hurley all the group's releases 
— plus a dozen albums as prizes for 
Hurley's contest. (Bryan Houston con- 
tributed a case of Nescafe.) 

Charles R. Kinney, WIKK station 
manager, reported to the agency that 
"The Smith Brothers Nescafe promo- 
tion was a tremendous success. . . . 
These boys were jumping all day. We 
have never had a nicer group to work 
with." * * * 



WFMY-TV described as 
'modern as tomorrow' 

"Plenty of space for lavish shows or 
commercials"' was the order Gaines 
Kelly, general manager of WFMY-TV, 
Greensboro, N. C, gave to his station 
engineers and architects over a year 
ago when he decided to enlarge the 
station. 

On 1 February the station officially 
opened its new studios, which were 
christened with its first local, live com- 
mercial program — a demonstration of 
the 1955 Chrysler line of cars. 

Kelly said the new building "is as 
modern as tomorrow. It's one of the 
best-equipped stations in the countrv. 
has two major studios with outstand- 
ing lighting. With five-and-a-half years 
of experience behind us we have every- 
thing to look forward to." 

The new building gives WFMY-TV 
eight times the space it had in its old 
quarters. Coupled with the move was 
a power increase to 100 kw and a 759- 
foot antenna tower. Kelly says the 
new power and tower adds about 300.- 
000 people to WFMY-TV's audience 
for a total of more than two million. 

• • • 



THE MOST POWERFUL TV STATION IN NORTH AMERICA! 



You Can SERVE . ./. SELL and PROFIT Well 

ckiw rv MILLION DOLLAR 

CKLW-TVsl 



YOUR AUDIENCE WILL SEE . . 



The Finest collection of First Run 
Movies ever scheduled in the Detroit 
Morket. 



YOUR CLIENT WILL 



fKUtll Willi Six participating film commercials per 
week in a repeated First Run Movie 
Schedule in high rated premium time. 



YOUR COMMERCh 
AN ESTABLISHED 



VLS SELL TO 
\UDIENCE . 



Based on current performances First 
Run Movies repeated four times 
weekly have produced a cumulative 
ARB Rating of 50.1 . . . 600,000 TV 
homes with an average of 2.5 viewers 
per set at a cost of 76c per thousand 
viewers. 



It all adds up tp a million dollar bargain so write, wire or phone your 
Adam J. Young Representative or 



CKLW-TV channel 9, Detroit 



WHH 



WHLI 



ONE STATION 

DOMINATES LISTENING 

... in the Major Long Island Market 




WHLI 

Network "A ' 

Network "B" 

Network "C" 

Ind. Station (NYC) 
Network "D" 



Morning 

23 

20 
9 
9 

7 
9 



All Others 15 



Afternoon 

23 

21 
12 

7 

9 

6 
17 



ONE STATION— WHLI— HAS A LARGER DAYTIME AUDIENCE 
IN THE MAJOR LONG ISLAND MARKET THAN ANY NETWORK 
OR INDEPENDENT STATION! 




WHLI 

HEMPSTEAD 
LONG ISLAND. N. Y. 



AM 1100 
F M 98.3 



tkomof 
jjmiliwui. 



Paul Goflolsky. rrrt. 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



97 



TV COMMERCIALS 

(Continued from page 42) 

the same weekly set. At first there 
hardly seems room to do much about 
picture so you concentrate on the 
words and let the pans, cuts and dolly- 
ins fall where they may. 

But, again, that's doing the obvious. 
Viewers, whose toilet habits are now 
strangely regulated for between-the- 
acts and between-the-programs, are be- 
ginning to demand more than just a 
voice and more than just a face to hold 



them still for any selling message. It's 
truer now than it was a year ago- — and 
it will be still truer in the years to 
come: would-be customers have to be 
shown why. 

Recently one of the most notorious 
of all such television personalities woke 
up one evening to discover that one of 
his star products had just yielded first 
place in the market to a late-starter. 
Out of fairness, quality of product 
must play a part in the ever-more-se- 
lective American market. Yet the fact 
remains that the personality in ques- 



would rub 
his eyes ... in 

amazement! 




Yes . . . things have changed since General 
Custer set out from Bismarck in the 1870'a 
for the ill-fated battle of the Little 
Big Horn! 

He wouldn't recognize the office building* 
and industrial plants which now crowd 
North Dakota's capital city ... or the sur- 
rounding countryside, once roamed by 
the Sioux, now dotted with prosperous farm*. 
Today this is the land of agriculture, of 
oil — and television sets! 

And . . . what the good name KFYR 
has meant to radio listeners for the last 30 
years, KFYR-TV (with 100,000 watts of 
maximum power) now means to increasing 
thousands of TV-viewers. May we whet your 
further interest with some interesting facts? 
We've got 'em — so has Blair-TV, Inc. 



NBC 



CBS 



ABC 



DUMONT 



KFYR-tv 



channel 



5 



BISMARCK. N. DAK. 

Represented Nationally by Blair-TV, Inc. 



tion — the person who got results by 
clever understatements — was a party to 
a product that had slipped. His com- 
mercials were picture-lazy. From now 
on, he'll have to do more than just talk 
about this product — more than stick it 
within camera range whenever he 
pleases. 

The days of 100 r r reliance on tal- 
ent to go it alone in a tv selling pitch 
are fast fading. The reason is viewers 
are simply outgrowing the influence of 
testimonials which are not carefully 
planned and ambitiously visualized. 
Christ himself had some trouble con- 
vincing more than a certain number 
because the proof He offered for sal- 
vation went just so far, and faith was 
suppose to take over from there. 

1 he tv pitchman cannot afford to 
leave any part of his story to faith. 
His audience may not be so inherently 
hostile as those Christ faced, but they 
are seldom cheering him on unless 
they know from experience his prod- 
uct is best. 

One cigarette company recently did 
a twist on the old unbelievable and 
stilted testimonial by securing as on- 
camera endorsers famous people who 
never openly endorsed anything be- 
fore. They were more the skeptical 
type. And their copy was honestly 
skeptical. These people were placed on 
a set resembling their natural habitat 
rather than in a typical living room or 
bedroom. The whole thing came off as 
credible and effective. So effective was 
it, in fact, that competition began hop- 
ping the bandwagon almost immedi- 
ately. 

An electric razor may be for shav- 
ing a face, but to get across a strong 
copy story, the copywriters comple- 
mented the obvious bv making it shave 
a peach and a hairbrush. All this, 
mind you, demonstrated by a piece of 
high-price talent who has been known 
to go it on his own, aided in his heyday 
with nothing more visual than a small 
boy and a couple of large charts. 

By no means am I underrating the 
value of selecting sales talent with the 
finest of care. Sincerity is a require- 
ment, yes. But we're mature enough 
now to take sincerity thoroughly for 
granted. It's like wearing pants. It's 
only noticed when it isn't then. 

What about the number of scenes in 
a commercial? While you don't need 
a great many to hold the viewer, you 
can spark your efforts by not dwelling 
too lonn on am one shot. Certainly 
if the famous little sjirl with the con- 



98 



SPONSOR 



vertible sofa could do her act, night- 
gown and all, in 10 seconds flat, a lot 
of ground could be covered in a min- 
ute. Consider the animated razor blade 
commercials on the boxing shows. So 
much happens in 50 seconds that you 
are left slightly dazed. But not con- 
fused. 

True, animation offers the perfect 
opportunity for visual interest. But 
what about advertisers with limited 
budgets? Isn't the announcer-behind- 
the-desk technique worth the money? 
Sometimes, but it's often possible to 
spend even less money than that and 
still be more interesting and sell hard- 
er. One of the most fascinating film 
commercials I ever saw concentrated 
on nothing but still photographs. The 
camera moved in and out — one photo 
even revolved to give the impression 
of a live and moving ferris wheel. I 
know from sales results it was highly 
successful. And the whole job cost 
less than three hundred dollars. 

Putting a commercial in a class by 
itself picturewise is naturally easier in 
some cases than in others. Cigarettes 
are to be smoked and they cannot 
shave peaches. Automobiles are to be 
driven and they cannot revolve like 
ferris wheels. Detergents, too, must 
strain a bit to illustrate claims that 
sometimes overlap in similarity. But, 
for my money, many of the greatest 
commercials on the air stem from 
products in these categories because 
certain copywriters were bold enough 
to seek adventure into fields where 
even research had not yet trod. 

Because there are so many variables, 
it is presumptuous for anybody to at- 
tempt to set down rules for avoiding 
picture-laziness in tv commercials. For 
instance, a commercial within a pro- 
gram does not have to bid quite so 
strongly for initial attention as does a 
spot commercial fending for itself. An 
animated commercial may be created 
for an ever-building impact on a heavy 
spot schedule, but may show up poor- 
ly on a one-shot test or when not given 
the opportunity to establish itself. 
Some types of products just naturally 
demonstrate better than others. And 
the amount of money available for pro- 



THE EASIEST WAY 
TO SELL THE BIG NASHVILLE 

NEGRO MARKET 

USE ALL-NEGRO STAFFED 



WSOK 



duction of the commercial is always 
a factor. 

With that in mind, perhaps we can 
generalize to this extent: 

1. Observe what competition is do- 
ing. If you can then create a different- 
looking commercial without sacrificing 
selling impact, do so. 

2. If you decide on an un-camera 
salesman, give him something to do 
that will help to sell the product vis- 
ually. A little extra rehearsal may 
cost more, but it's good for the soul 
— and the commercial. 

3. Whenever a person is shown hold- 
ing your product, steer away from 
trite poses. Nothing looks more ridic- 
ulous and unreal than a smiling bim- 
bo holding the package next to her 
ear. It may frame right, but that's all 
that can be said for it. Nobody ever 
went wrong showing the product in 
the clear. 

4. For advertising impact, if not for 
viewer interest, remember that super- 
imposed lettering at strategic times 
can help drive home your basic sales 
theme. 

5. Relate your picture to your spo- 
ken (or sung) copy and vice versa. 
Both suffer when they work at cross 
purposes. 

6. Use as many scenes as you need 
to tell your story. When several scenes 
are called for, make none less than 
four seconds. Be sure the transitions 
from one to another are smooth and 
logical so the viewer can follow com- 
fortably. 

7- Remember that some of the most 
successful commercials are loaded with 
closeups. When using a medium or 
long shot, keep the picture simple and 
the background uncluttered. 

8. Plan the kinds of scenes that take 
little or no explanation. The picture 
should pretty much stand on its own. 

9. Make certain every scene is di- 
rectly relevant to selling. The man who 
takes so long to slide down the snowy 
hill in the wine commercial entertains, 
but he hasn't much time left to sell. 

10- Ideally, three craftsmen should 
collaborate on the creation of the com- 
mercial — the copywriter, the art di- 
rector and the producer. 

11- Keep abreast of television re- 
search, ft can save you time before 
vou even begin. * * * 




\o$r it costs less 

to sell 

MINNEAPOLIS 

ST. PAUL 

Maximum power at minimum 
cost — choice availabilities. 



316,000 
watts on 
Channel 9 




Offices, Studies, Transmitter 

FOSHAY TOWER 

Minneapolis 
Represented Nationally by H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



99 



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Mr. Bernie Piatt, 
Sponsor Publications, Inc. 
UO E. U9th Street 
New York, New York 

Dear Bernie: 

For some time I have been intending to send you this note express- 
ing my compliments to Sponsor for the excellent industry service 
provided by your Radio and TV station, Program Guide. 

An important consideration in the selection of a station for local 
or regional sports events is the volume of programming of this type 
carried. 

While I have referred frequently to the Sports material contained 
in the Guide, comments I have heard indicate that those engaged in 
other buying activities also find it a source of valuable information. 



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Please reserve following space in the 
1955 BUYERS' GUIDE TO STATION PROGRAMING 



"»X%* 



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$780 






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Q /?<Zi pafl-c $390 

7JT/0 

D Aa// page $220 

horizontal 7H% 

□ third page .... $150 

horizontal 7x3M 

□ tAirrf pa^rc .... $150 

vertical ShixlO 

(special directories 

only, »f.c Hat at right) 



FREQUENCY DISCOUNTS APPLY 



n I prefer placement in 
Master Directory 

n I prefer placement in 
category listings. 

D I prefer front of book 



Firm„ 



City_ 



_2one- 



-State_ 



CATEGORY 
LISTINGS 

RADIO 

Classical Music 
Farm Service 
Folk Mutic 
Foreign Language 
Home.making 
Mexican- American 
Negro 

I'oinda r Music 
Poat-Midnit4 
Sport* 

TELEVISION 

Farm Service 

Feature Film 

Homcrnaking 

Special Facilities <ft 
Film <ft Slide 
Specifications 

Specialized Appeals 

Sports 

Syndicated 
Film-for-TV 



Nome. 



.. S peci«K« d n 
programming 

REA CHES. 
SELLS 

350,000 NejtoWMM 1 
j0C Adams 

uals) • 




■m 



10,000 WATTS 

Transmitter: Los Angeles, California 
Executive Offices: Santa Monica, California 

National Representatives: 
Forjoe & Co. New York, Chicago, 

Dallas, San Francisco 
Dora Clayton Atlanta, Georgia 

GEORGE A. BARON, Gan'l Mgr. 




the 

KMBC-KFRM 

Radio TEAM 

You're making a blue ribbon radio buy 
in a blue chip market when you use the 
Midwest's leading radio combination, 
KMMC-KFRM. KMBC delivers metro- 
politan Kansas City (ranked 15th na- 
tionally in retail sales) plus 79 counties 
in eastern Kansas and western Missouri. 
KI-KM, a bonus to KMBC, serves Kan- 
sas, sixth richest agricultural state. To 
get to this big, responsive Heart of America 
at the lowest cost per advertising impres- 
sion, the first thing to do is to see your 
Free & Peters Colonel. He'll give you 
first-rate availabilities on the Team's first- 
rated radio schedule. 

KMBC otf Kansas City 

KFRM fa* the State of Kansas 




1 » I . I Pi r i «-,, Inc 



SPOT RADIO ROUNDUP 

{Continued from page 39) 

week per market. The spot radio bud- 
get has remained constant in 1955. 

Jell-0 (through Y&R) increased its 
1955 spot radio budget substantially 
— some 34% over 1954. At least part 
of the reason is the fact that Jell-0 is 
buying higher frequency this year than 
last. 

3. More advertisers now buy radio 
consistently in large metropolitan mar- 
kets. "Lots of buys last year were an 
attempt to buy 'beyond tv'," says Mor- 
ris Kellner, Katz Agency's radio sales 
manager. "They used to buy tv in 
some markets, radio in others. Actual- 
ly, there are more radio-only homes in 
big metropolitan markets than in 
smaller ones." 

Lincoln-Mercury (through Kenyon 
& Eckhardt) is one of the outstanding 
examples of an account that not only 
recently increased its use of spot radio, 
but has also put most of the added ap- 
propriations into coverage of big met- 
ropolitan tv centers: New York, Chi- 
cago and Los Angeles. 

Another K&E account, Nabisco's 
100% Brand Cereal, is also planning 
regular and heavy spot radio sched- 
ules in big metropolitan centers. The 
campaign, starting 7 February, will be 
the brand's first large-scale push. 

Ex-Lax I through Warwick & Leg- 
ler) has been in radio for some 30 
years. The account came back into 
spot radio last fall after a three-year 
hiatus, with coverage of big metropol- 
itan centers as well as smaller markets. 

Filbert's Margarine (through SSCB l 
is buying spot radio more heavily in 
big metropolitan centers this year than 
last. The account's spot radio budget 
has remained constant, but Filbert's is 
getting greater frequency in certain 
markets. 

Barbasol (through Erwin, Wasey) 
is concentrating its spot radio cam- 
paign principally in big metropolitan 
centers. The 20-week campaign that 
started on 10 January is confined to 
New York and Chicago at the moment, 
but Barbasol expects to go into Phila- 
delphia, Boston and Cleveland as well. 

Account-by-account, here is some of 
the most recent activity in spot radio: 

lirown & Williamson I Ted Bates I : 
This cigarette manufacturer moved 



back into spot radio on 1 January with 
a new strategy and an expanded mar- 
ket list. The firm reconsidered spot 
radio because it felt that it could not 
ailord to overlook radio-only homes in 
tv markets, not to mention the existing 
radio-only markets. B&W concentrates 
on early-morning radio in tv markets, 
morning and night in radio-only areas. 

Carter Products {Ted Bates) : Car- 
ter Products have consistently used 
spot radio. However, this year the 
agency has added high-powered sta- 
tions in metropolitan centers to "reach 
out beyond tv coverage." In tv areas, 
Carter is generally on radio between 
7:00 and 9:00 a.m. 

P. Lorillard Co. [Lennen & New- 
ell) : P. Lorillard used spot radio and 
tv to introduce its new brand, the Old 
Gold Filtertip cigarette. There's the 
same emphasis on spot radio in 1955 
as there was in late 1954. In short, 
Lennen & Newell is buying five- to six- 
week saturation campaigns, using 
early-morning radio in big tv markets. 
Frequency ranges from 10 announce- 
ments a week to 40 or 50. 

Sterling Drug {Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample) : Sterling's Bayer Aspirin i9 
continuing its 1954 spot radio strategy 
into 1955. This year, as last, the prod- 
uct is using radio in some 75 markets, 
generally on a 52-week basis. Sched- 
ules range from five to 15 60-second 
announcements per market per week. 
Bayers has no set pattern where types 
of stations are concerned, but seeks 
the broadest audience in each market. 

Dr. Lyons Toothpaste, another Ster- 
ling Drug product, is also continuing 
its 1954 spot radio strategy. This 
product covers 30 to 40 markets with 




"Nothing very <crious — just another overworked 
KRIZ Phoenix advertiser." 



102 



SPONSOR 



daytime and early-morning announce- 
ments throughout the year. 

Liebmann Breweries (Foole, Cone & 
Belding) : This hrewer has one motto 
for his Rheingold Deer: "We want to 
dominate whatever medium we're us- 
ing in the area we're using it in." In 
radio this has meant an increased ap- 
propriation for 1955. On New Year's 
Eve 1953, the firm sponsored one hour 
of Guy Lombardo over eight New York 
City stations. Last New Year's Eve 
■coverage extended to 28 stations in up- 
state New York, Connecticut, New Jer- 
sey and Philadelphia. 

Rheingold's announcement schedules 
have remained constant this year, with 
a frequency of some 300 announce- 
ments weekly over 20 stations in its 
Eastern distrihution area. Rheingold 
is al?o a heavy spot radio user in 
Southern California. The brewer uses 
morning, afternoon and nighttime ra- 
dio. 

Lincoln-Mercury Dealers Assn. 
(Kenyon & Eckhardt) : This advertis- 
er is plunging into spot radio with a 
far bigger appropriation than he had 
in 1954, because the dealers liked the 



sales results the medium produced last 
year. Lincoln-Mercury Dealers will 
continue to concentrate on early-morn- 
ing and late-afternoon schedules in or- 
der to reach men while they're driving. 
Unusual for this client, however, is the 
addition of major metropolitan mar- 
kets, like New York, Chicago and Los 
Angeles. 

National Biscuit Co. (Kenyon & 
Eckhardt) : Nabisco started its first 
large-scale campaign for lOO^v Brand 
Cereal on 7 February. 

The schedules are not being placed 
in a pre-determined time slot. Rather, 
K&E is looking for adjacencies near 
programs with a particular following. 

Nabisco is not planning to use tv 
for this product right now. The firm 
will launch two waves of spot radio 
announcements, each lasting five 
weeks. 

Jell-0 (Young & Rubicam) : Jell-O's 
spot radio strategy of 1955 has a new 
look. Last year, the agency looked for 
local personalities. This year, Jell-0 
is concentrating on early-morning ra- 
dio and frequency (five to 20 an- 
nouncements a week per market) 



rather than on personality. This year, 
as last, Jell-0 is buying powerhouse 
stations for extensive coverage. 

Jell-O's 1955 spot radio budget is 
one-third higher than its spot radio 
budget in 1951, Why is Jell-0 put- 
ting extra emphasis on spot radio? 

"Because we can get the most cov- 
erage most economically with radio," 
a Y&R executive told sponsor. 

Filbert's Margarine (SSCB) : This 
client was among the first to go on 
the air in 1955. 

"We're doing the same, only more 
of it," says Steve Suren, timebuyer on 
the account. "We've stepped up the 
frequency to about five announcements 
a week per market." 

This year, as last, Filbert's is in 
some 40 markets with a 10- to 13-week 
campaign. Since the product is bought 
and used by housewives, SSCB buys 
daytime and early afternoon sched- 
ules. The firm will be on the air with 
two more radio campaigns in 1955. 

Q-Tips (Lawrence C. Gumbinner) : 
For its first national air effort, Q-Tips 
is using a combination of network ra- 
dio and spot radio. The spot radio 



NOW 

Stronger pull 
than ever! 




7 FEBRUA 



KMJ-TV 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA • CHANNEL 24 

boosts; power! 

Video power up to 447,000 watts 
Audio power up to 223,500 watts 
. . . increasing signal power 12.58 times 

KMJ-TV pioneered TV in this important inland Cali- 
fornia market. It's the San Joaquin Valley's most-tuned- 
to TV station". Now, with a powerful new signal and 
the finest transmitter location in the Valley, it has more 
audience pull than ever. And more than ever, KMJ-TV 
is your best TV buy in the Valley! 

KMJ-TV — Fresno's First Station — First in Power 
— First in Audience 

Paul H. Raymer, National Representative 

° KMJ-TV carries 19 out of the 25 top-rated nighttime pro- 
grams viewed in the Fresno area. (October 1954 ARB report). 



103 



schedule started on 31 January in 40 
markets. 

"Spot radio can do an extremely 
effective job for us at a comparatively 
low cost," says \nita Wasserman, 
timebuyer for Q-Tips. "Also, we have 
the added advantage of merchandising 
support that stations offer us." 

The 20-week spot radio campaign is 
aimed primarily at young mothers. 
It consists of three to six broadcasts 
weekly on each station of a 60-second 
announcement mentioning the advan- 
tage of Q-Tips swabs in baby care. 

The agencj decided to go into spot 
radio on a large scale as a result of 
a successful fall 1954 campaign on 
WNEW, New York. Q-Tips broadcast 
some 35 20-second announcements 
weekly over the station from Septem- 
ber through December. 

General Mills {Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample) : This client began using spot 
radio for its Gold Medal Flour for an 
additional purpose last fall, is con- 
tinuing through spring 1955: to cover 
small towns with little or no tv. Some 
30 to 35 of its spot radio markets are 
in that category. 



/ eJ-oA oUetatleS 1 

(Just The Facts) 

on the 

L. A. Mexican American 



KWKW's 

Belden Survey 
Shows 

• Product Preference 

• Family Income 

• Media Preference* 

• Yes, the survey shows KWKW 
audience to he better than 
that of the nexl two stations 
combined. 

GET THE FACTS FROM 

am KWKW fm 

PASADENA - LOS ANGELES 



Hf.riti »/ w i/;i / v 
Mew Vorki Richard O'Connel] It 
San Francisco i Broadcast Time S 



The firm also uses spot radio to 
reach special groups: 10 Negro mar- 
kets, six to eight Spanish-language 
markets. 

General Mills' schedules, always day- 
lime, are on a 39- to 52-week basis. 
Frequency ranges from five to 10 an- 
nouncements a week. 

Atlantic Refining Co. (N. W. Ayer) : 
This newcomer to spot radio (this is 
firm's second year) lias been adding 
to its schedules consistently. Current- 
ly. Atlantic Refining is using 5-, 10- 
and 15-minute newscasts on 60 sta- 
I ions throughout the South, from 
Maryland to Florida. In New York, 
the agency has bought 5-minute weath- 
ercasts to be broadcast three times 
weekly over 18 am and 12 fm stations. 

Like most gas companies, Atlantic 
also sponsored baseball in New York, 



"The real truth is thai freedom of the 
press and the freedom to broadcast are 
policies rather than principles, and they 
vary widely with changes in puhlic opin- 
ion — and with the opinion of persuasive 
thought leaders. I think it's safe to say 
that the general public is inherently and 
automatically in favor of the precept 
of freedom to broadcast, without con- 
dition or qualification." 

THAD II. BROWN, JR. 

Vice President in Charge Tv 
NARTB, Washington 



New England and Pennsylvania in 
1954 is expected to do so in 1955. 

Though there is unquestionable in- 
terest and activity in spot radio, the 
medium isn't necessarily entering a 
second honeymoon with clients and 
agencies. On several fronts, spot radio 
continues to have an uphill fight. 

There are, for example, a number of 
accounts that are reducing or drop- 
ping spot radio. Among them. Bab-0 
(through D-F-S) is significant, be- 
cause of its long history in the medi- 
um. American Chicle (through D-F-S) 
plans lo buy less spot radio because 
of the expense of its new network t\ 
lni\. The Texas Co. (through Kud- 
nerl is dropping spot radio for net- 
work radio this spring. And Nescafe 
(through Bryan Houston) is reducing 
its spol radio schedules somewhat. 

Il i- >lill too early for a conclusive 
forecast ol spol radio 1955. For Jan- 
uary, however, the positive side of the 
coin shines fai brighter than the nega- 
tive. • • • 



ESSO 

I Continued from page 35) 

Jersey) — covers the Eastern seaboard 
and part of the South — 18 states in all 
ranging from Maine to Louisiana. 

Esso could use a regional network. 
It likes spot for two reasons, however. 
First, the Esso Reporter in each town 
is identified with the local radio sta- 
tion and the local "voice" (announc- 
ers remain anonymous, but they're 
usually among the better-known an- 
nouncers at each station I . Further, 
local news can be featured — to the ex- 
clusion of national or regional new-, 
if warranted. 

Second, Esso likes spot because it 
can air commercials which are appro- 
priate for each market. The company 
may want to push anti-freeze in New 
England, for example, and promote 
tires in Louisiana. This is important 
to a company operating in a wide 
range of climates, Esso Ad Manager 
I!. VI. Gray and Assistant Ad Manager 
Vernon Carrier stressed to sponsor. 

Some advertisers may fear spot ra- 
dio, however. They may feel that it's 
hard to hold together a scattered op- 
eration and to promote relativeh un- 
glamorous spot (as opposed to net- 
work ) to its dealers. 

This is where the agency steps in. 
Marschalk & Pratt keeps in close touch 
with all the radio stations and with 
Esso as well. Here's how: 

As soon as a new station is added 
to the Esso lineup. Tom Brown. Mar- 
schalk & Pratt's liaison man between 
the agency and the radio-tv stations, 
or Curt Peterson, M&P radio-tv vice 
president — or both — visit the station. 
Along with the usual handshaking the 
station manager gets a book from Mar- 
schalk & Pratt called 'Y our Esso He- 
porter — Instructions & Suggestions." 

The book spells out exactly how the 
Esso Reporter is to be handled by the 
station. It emphasizes that "selection 
of news service and news content is 
the responsibilirj of the local station, 
without sponsor limitation or restric- 
tion, Il does caution, however, 
against editorial interpretation. And 
il mention- thai "on more than one 
Occasion, the sponsor has been in- 
voked in an unflattering news inci- 
dent on the sponsor's own program. 
That's a calculated i i — k . because the 
new - must remain in\ iolate." 



I lie 

nouncei 



look gives suggestions to an- 



il. 



sample : 



"Th 



e vigor am 



104 



SPONSOR 



enthusiasm of the announcer's voice 
plays a large part in the impression 
news — or commercial — makes on the 
audience.") 

Even emergencies are covered in the 
instruction book. In case of a tragic 
event in a station's area, for example. 
the announcer is told to discard the 
scheduled commercial and to substitute 
a "standby" anouncemeut. These an- 
nouncements briefly touch on topics 
such as freedom of the press, with onl\ 
the mention of Esso as sponsor of the 
program. In addition telephone num- 
bers and addresses of Marschalk & 
Pratt and Fsso executives are listed so 
that they can be contacted in an emer- 
gency, if warranted. 

Esso gives stations carrying the Re- 
porter a gentle hint that it would like 
them to promote the show. It doesn't 
demand extra promotion and it prob- 
ably wouldn't drop a station from the 
schedule if the outlet refused to pro- 
mote the show. As the company ex- 
plains, however, "It goes without say- 
ing that a good news program will 
prosper ... in direct proportion to 
the promotion that is behind it. Esso 
Standard Oil Co. backs up this pro- 
gram from time to time with newspa- 
per advertising and sales promotion." 

Esso advises its radio stations that 
it's doubly important that the) keep 
Marschalk & Pratt advised on their 
promotion. "First," Esso says, "it's 
important that you don't 'hide your 
light under a bushel.' Second, these 
reports help us to help you by acting 
as a clearing house for good promo- 
tion ideas." Esso "suggests" that sta- 
tions send in monthly reports on their 
activities; to make the job easier — 
and to more or less act as a reminder 
— the agency sends the outlets a stand- 
ard promotion report form to be filled 
out and returned. Liaison man Brown 
and radio-tv director Peterson also dis- 
cuss promotion of the £550 Reporter 
with the stations on their periodic vis- 
its. (Some of the promotion Esso has 
obtained from stations is illustrated 
on page 35.) 

\\ hat are the criteria Esso uses in 
choosing stations? 

Most basic, perhaps, is cost-per- 
1.000. Yet even this is not the final 
answer. For example, Curt Peterson 
told sponsor that the cost-per-1,000 
for radio has gone up in the past few 
years. "We didn't drop radio." he ex- 
plained, "because even at the slight 
increase in price it's still a darned 
good buy." 



The cost-per-1,000 is figured with 
the help of local ratings. In one mar- 
ket it might be Pulse, in another Hoo- 
per, and so forth. 

(The various local ratings cannot In- 
averaged out to give Esso an indica- 
tion of its total audience, however. 
Besides the fact that the rating serv- 
ices van widely in technique, the days 
or weeks which they survey are not 
the same for all markets. Seasonal va- 
riations in listening would therefore 
make the results inaccurate. To ob- 
tain its average monthly audience Esso 



uses Nielsen cumulative latings figured 
on a network basis. In other words, 
although Nielsen couldn't give Esso 
a reliable rating for many of the mar- 
kets on an individual basis because of 
an inadequate sample, Nielsen can — 
using the same techniques it uses for 
obtaining network ratings — give Esso 
a reliable indication of its audience 
over the 18-state area.) 

Esso uses "prestige" stations. This 
means that frequently the company 
buys time on one of the biggest, most 
powerful outlets. But not always. 




A New Orleans street named Desire 
— hut where is everybody? 

If the time is between 6 and 9 a.m., they're very 
likely listening to Louisiana "Larm (dock. This 
sprightly \\ DS1 program acts as eye opener to a 
large and loyal following. And it has been an eye 
opener to sponsors to see how well 'Larm Clock g 
Harry Wood can sell their products. 



WDSU RADIO —New Orleans— Vital To The South* Biggesl Market 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



105 



Every now and again it drops a sta- 
tion it's had for a long time and sub- 
stitutes another in the same city. A 
couple years ago, for instance, Esso 
dropped a 50 kw outlet which had car- 
ried the Reporter for more than 18 
years and bought instead a 5 kw sta- 
tion. The former outlet covered more 
territory. The 5 kw station obviously- 
covered fewer people but two years 
before the switch Esso had bought 
three stations which actually were 
within the coverage area of the power- 
house. The company apparently felt 
that it was better to have more local 
coverage with more stations rather 
than one big station blanketing an en- 
tire region in this instance. However, 
out of the 52 radio stations now on the 
schedule, 13 are 50 kw outlets. (On 
the other hand, five are 250 watt sta- 
tions.) 

Time periods bought by Esso drop 
into one of four periods, with an aver- 
age of three of these periods used by 
Esso on each station. Time periods are 
early morning (breakfast), lunchtime, 
early evening (dinnertime) and late 
evening (bedtime). 

Esso believes it reaches the most 
men this way. During some of these 



the music that 
pleases . . . the people 
pleases uou . . . 



s l 



vonsor . 



CALL OR WRITE 
NOW FOR SPOT 
AND PROGRAM 
AVAILABILITIES 




KOME 

THE MUSIC STATION FOR 
THE MAGIC EMPIRE 

5000 WATTS 

TULSA, OKLAHOMA 



time periods in some markets, says Es- increased profits." Esso reminds deal- 
so, more women than men may actual- ers that when they do their own radio 
ly be listening. As long as the number advertising they "enlist the help of 
(rather than percentage) of male lis- millions of dollars worth of advertis- 
teners is high and the station rate card m S which Esso Standard Oil buys to 
favorable, Esso says it's getting a te ^ people about the products and serv- 
sound buy. ices ) ou offer." 



Dealers buy time: Esso encourages 
its dealers (who operate as indepen- 
dent businessmen ; they don't even 
have to feature Esso-only products) 
to buy their own time on radio. Twice 
a year the agency writes to 1 kw (or 
less) stations in Esso's marketing 
area. It asks these 632 stations if 
they'd like Esso's book, called "How 
Local Radio can increase business and 
profits for an Esso Dealer." In re- 
sponse to the current mailing, 360 ra- 
dio stations said, "Send it." A follow- 
up letter went to the stations which 
got the book, offering a new Margaret 
Whiting transcribed musical jingle, 
free of charge. But the radio station 
was to indicate how many Esso dealers 
had bought time. Replies to this letter 
still are coming in but by sponsor 
presstime the radio stations respond- 
ing indicated a total of more than 400 
Esso dealers buying time. 

The dealer book is in three parts. 
The first, addressed to radio station 
managers, gives hints on how to sell 
announcements or programs to Esso 
dealers. The second part, for the deal- 
ers' use, offers practical advice on the 
value of local radio programs and 
some of the principles of advertising. 
(Example: "DO give your radio ad- 
vertising a chance to prove itself! 
DON'T sponsor a few isolated broad- 
casts, then give up because you aren't 
immediately swamped with custom- 
ers.") 

The third part of the Esso dealer 
book contains more than 60 30-second 
commercials to be read with a novelty 
musical jingle (not the Whiting jingle 
but another called "See your Esso 
dealer"). The commercials are hard- 
selling copy for more than a score of 
Esso dealer products and services. 

In an introduction for its dealers, 
Esso says "Hundreds of Esso dealers 
are proving radio's selling power every 
day by sponsoring their own advertis- 
ing. They buy one-minute announce- 
ments on their local stations — one of 
the most effective kinds of advertising 
ever devised. . . . When you put these 
commercials on the air, you take an 
important step toward more business. 



Reporter's' start: The Esso Re- 
porter was conceived on the corner of 
43rd and Broadway in July 1935 and 
born on October 7, 1935. 

It was on the corner of 43rd and 
Broadway that Harry C. Marschalk 
ran into Clifford Click, a salesman for 
NBC. Glick told Marschalk that the 
United Press had decided to change its 
newspaper subscribers-only policy and 
was ready to lease its news service to 
NBC. Glick suggested that possibly 
Marschalk could sell the idea to Esso 
which sponsored Guy Lombardo on 
radio through M&P. 

Marschalk proposed the idea of 
news programs to Dr. R. T. Haslam, 
then the Standard sales manager. 

Only Marschalk had a twist to the 
NBC proposition. NBC had offered 
Marschalk an opportunity to buy 15- 
minute news shows. Marschalk thought 
it would be better to sponsor four 
five-minute shows daily. When it be- 
came obvious that Esso would like to 
buy five-minute segments, NBC was 
aghast. The network didn't have a 
five-minute rate. After a little pon- 
dering, NBC agreed to sell Esso, via 
Marschalk & Pratt, five-minute news 
shows. 

For 26 weeks Esso bought the net- 
work, but then it began to shift to a 
spot campaign, covering the territory 
which Esso serves. It's used spot radio 
in this same five-minute form ever 
since. 

Because it is a regional firm. Esso 
canot use most magazines. It does buy- 
space in the New Yorker, however, 
and an occasional Sunday supplement. 
It uses newspaper advertising and has 
extensive billboard locations. Esso al- 
so works closely with dealers in direct 
mail campaigns to Esso customers. 

(In a future issue: How Esso tele- 
\ ises the news.) * * "* 



RADIO & TV PERSONNEL 

We screen New York's vast 
source of qualified personnel; 
take the guesswork out of hir- 
ing for stations anywhere. Tell 
us your needs, we do the rest I 




CAREER BUILDERS a. 



iguncf M 
Marjori* Witty, Director, Radio-TV DiV. 
35 West 53rd St., New York 19 • PL 7-6385 

»»mmmMHHKKMRHMtKUBil 



106 



SPONSOR 



TALENT PROBLEM 

( Continued from page 37 ) 

to the west coast program director. 

Many admen feel the networks 
should set up more opportunities for 
new talent to expose itself and develop. 
Some would like to see more amateur 
talent shows on the air. Others would 
like the webs to provide more local 
opportunities on their owned-and-oper- 
ated stations. 

While agencies look to the networks 
to carry the brunt of talent scouting, 
they feel they have some scouting re- 
sponsibilities themselves. Some of the 
talent people at the agencies want to 
get sponsors more involved in the 
talent quest on the grounds that an 
agency would not sign up new talent 
itself unless client indicated interest. 
3. The opinion that ad agencies must 
show more backbone in talent and pro- 
graming negotiation was expressed in 
some quarters. It was not frequently 
expressed (it is, after all, self-criticism) 
but when it was expressed, it was in 
strong terms. 

Agencies were advised to ( 1 ) set a 
ceiling on talent costs and stick to it 
and (2) assert more control over pro- 
graming. An example of the former 
policy is the ceiling set by J. Walter 
Thompson (in the forefront of those 
fighting the talent agent price scale) 
on Lux Video Theatre. This ceiling is 
said to be in the neighborhood of 
$3,500 for the lead player. The agency 
turned down Gloria Swanson's asking 
price of $7,500 (Editor's note: errone- 
ously printed at $75,000 in the previ- 
ous story) for appearing in "Sunset 
Boulevard" and hired Miriam Hopkins 
instead. 

Agencies can assert more control 
over programing if they become more 
active in producing their own shows, 
it was said. This will help prevent a 
situation, so common now, whereby a 
complete show package is presented to 
the agency, either by talent agents or 
the networks, leaving the agencv with 
a simple take-it-or-leave-it alternative. 

The fact that the agencies often have 
little to say about supporting and non- 
performing talent in their own shows 
makes it doubly difficult for them to 
control costs. One big network adver- 
tiser told SPONSOR the talent agents 
often "dump second-rate supporting 
talent on us" because of the growing 
trend toward presenting complete pack- 
ages to sponsors and agencies. An 
agency programing executive said 



angrily that he couldn't even get from 
a talent agent a breakdown of above- 
and below-the-line costs for an expen- 
sive film show he is considering. 

"If I told you what the show cost," 
he said, "you'd understand why I'm so 
mad. But what can I do when the 
package is already made up? What 
makes it worse is that the talent agents 
are so arbitrary about things. I'm just 
expected to acquiesce." 
4. More dependence on writers is 
often suggested as a way of getting 
around the high cost of tv talent. An 
agency tv department manager said: 

"The agencies and networks would 
do well to pick up some writers dumped 
by Hollywood and get them into tv. 
There are a lot around since the movie 
people aren't producing as many pic- 
lures as they used to. Some of these 
guys are good, though they may have 
to get used to the lower tv pay scale." 
(Y&R has such a system already in 
effect.) 

The fact that writers generally get 
paid less than performing talent is the 
prime reason why admen would like 
to see more emphasis put upon writing. 
A source familiar with writers' salaries 
said that in many cases they get from 
15 to 25% of what a performing star 
gets. Even when a writer's name be- 
comes known he is not able to capi- 
talize on it to the same extent that a 
performing star can, it was pointed 
out. 

A sponsor check disclosed that tv 
network writers get from $250 to 
$2,500 per show with most of them in 
the lower end of this range. There 
are cases of writers who get $3,000 or 
even $4,000 but this is rare in tv and 
when it occurs the writer may perform 
another function, such as producer. 

For a half-hour show, a free-lance 
writer will be budgeted from $600 to 
double that, but with $750 the most 
common fee. For the hour drama 
shows, the range starts at $1,000 and 
ends at about $2,500 with only top, ex- 
perienced people getting the latter. 
Comedy writers get from $250 to 
$2,000, with a few going above that. 

An interesting sidelight on the 
writers' pay scale is the fact that an- 
other $100 or so may be given for a 
drama script run during "rating week." 
». The number of admen who said 
they would like to see the government 
do something about talent costs can be 
counted on the fingers of one hand, but 
the fact that Uncle Sam was mentioned 
at all gives some idea of the intensitv 



of feeling in some circles. This vocal 
minority would like to see the govern- 
ment take away from the networks 
their programing functions and limit 
them to selling time, the idea being 
that the combination of the two con- 
stitutes a form of monopoly. If the 
networks' programing wings are 
clipped, it is held, there would be leas 
emphasis on high-priced shows. 

One source said he thought the talent 
agents might well come under U. S. 
scrutiny on the ground that their power 
to tie in secondary and non-performing 
talent with the sale of a star constitutes 
restraint of trade. 

Actually, many admen, while they 
don't like the talent cost situation, con- 
sider it an example of free enterprise 
in exaggerated form, which is one of 
the reasons why they feel helpless to 
do anything about costs. Here are the 
difficulties the ad fraternity says it 
faces : 

Said an agency radio-tv department 
head: "Talent costs are just a matter 
of supply and demand. The high prices 
for Gleason and the others exist simply 
because somebody is willing to pay the 
price asked." 

Another adman put it even more 
succinctly: "If one pays, everybody 
pays." 

The point that the high prices paid 
by a minority of sponsors affects the 
entire price scale for talent inevitably 
raises the question of whether the high 
price shows are worth the money to 
those who sponsor them. For if they 
are, admen say, there is not likely to 
be any change in the situation until 
costs become obviously uneconomic. 



In the past 10 months 
WTRF-TV won 5 Awards 
in 5 national merchandis- 
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entered. This "know-how" 
goes to work for you A 
when you use .... 



WTRF 
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7 FEBRUARY 1955 



107 



I he standard — though not the onl) 
measuring rod is cost-per-1,000 
homes reached or cost-per-1,000 homes 
|icr commercial minute. The latter is 
useful I ecause it enables the slide-rule 
boys I" compare costs-per-1,000 foi 
shows "I different length . 

Nielsen figures indicate that the big- 
name variet) shows are still worth the 
cost. \- a group, the general variety 
shows on network tv are the most eco- 
nomical cost-per-1,000 1 m\ despite the 
fact that the average time-and-talent 
cost i- higher than any other group. 



I lie average nighttime general variet) 
-how. during earl) October (not Lri- 
cluding the spectaculars), cost $2.93- 

i L,000 homes per commercial min- 
ute. Werage -how cos! was 197,000. 
These are once-a-week show-, both 
hour and half-hour in Length. 

Averages, of course, can be mislead- 
ing and it must be pointed oul that the 
range went from $1.69 to $8.73-per- 
L,000 Imiiic- per commercial minute. 
While Nielsen would not reveal the 
cost-per-1,000 homes per commercial 
minute for specific -how-, it was 



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Rep.- RUERV-KI10DEL 
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learned that the big name shows with 
their big audiences tend to be at the 
cheaper end of the cost-per-1,000 
range. 

i The cost-per-1,000 homes per com- 
mercial minute is calculated as fol- 
lows: the average audience — not the 
regular six-minute Nielsen rating — is 
multiplied by the number of commer- 
cial minutes. This is divided by 1.000 
and the resulting quotient is then di- 
vided into the cost of the show. I 

After general variet) shows, the next 
cheapest program category is general 
drama with a figure of S3.68-per-l.000 
homes per commercial minute. Dear- 
esl category was what Nielsen calls 
"variet) music and other music." 

So far as trends go. however, the 
picture appears to be one of a leveling 
off of tv network costs-per-1.000 in 
1954 after a continuous drop previous- 
ly The cost-per-1,000 homes per com- 
mercial minute for evening shows 
during October was $3.91, compared 
with $3.97 during the corresponding 
period in 1953. The six-cent differ- 
ence is not considered significant. 

A comparison of half-hour evening 
shows in terms of 1,000 homes reached 
during the same October periods shows 
a slight increase from 1953 ($10.70 i 
to 1954 ($10.98). 

\\ hat will happen during the 1955- 
'56 season is another question. Admen 
expect that, with rising talent prices 
and more station competition prevent- 
ing any great increases in tv per-pro- 
gram audiences, the costs-per-1.000 
may well show a substantial increase. 

No advertising anah sis can end with 
cost-per-1,000, however, and there's the 
rub for those looking for a respite in 
the upward price spiral. In the first 
place, even if his cost goes up 50%, 
Gleason is not a bad buy. Secondly, 
and most important. Buick bought 
Gleason to create excitement for its 
product, which has shown a spectacu- 
lar rise in sales, having displaced 
PI) mouth as the third ranking car. I If 
Ihiick -ales are no better in 1955 than 
last year, the Gleason talent-and-pro- 
duction package will cost Buick — or 
Buick owners, depending on how you 
look at it around $6 per car. I 

The motives for Buick's payment of 
S3 million to Gleason during the next 
season shed light on why some of the 
othei big 3penders are acting as thej 
are. It i- notable. sa\ admen, that the 
auto firms- to whom cost-per-1.000 
is less important than, say, soap firms 
-land oul prominent!) among the 



108 



SPONSOR 



big spenders. Oldsinobile, Lincoln- 
Mercury, Chrysler are all beavil) in- 
volved in the big-show, big-name 
sweepstakes now going on in t\. Olds- 
mobile, like Buick. has been overtaking 
its competitors; Lincoln-Mercurj deal- 
ers have expressed undying gratitude 
for the sales job Ed Sullivan has done 
for them and probablj consult the 
cost-per-1,000 index seldom, il at all; 
Chnsler has made an all-out tv bid 
to regain its former standing. 

The situation described above is, in 
effect, the basis of arguments used by 
those who defend the prices asked by 
\\\1 and MCA. It is the job of talent 
agents, say the defenders, to net the 
highest price the) can for their clients. 

"The trouble with most talent," said 
a veteran agenc\ talent Inner, "is that 
the) believe their publicity. \nd if 
tbe\ feel their agent isn't getting as 
much money as possible for them, 
they'll junk him. Of course, talent isn't 
too likely to junk MCA and William 
Morris, but there is always the possi- 
bilitv that a big name will jump from 
one to the other. 

"It's true that MCA and William 
Morris are tough bargainers and I 
think one reason why prices are what 
they are is that some tv talent buyers 
don't have enough experience to bar- 
gain for or evaluate talent. But, you'll 
sometimes find the big talent agents 
more reasonable than the talent." 

Said another agency talent buyer: 
"It's often a convenience to be able to 
go to one source, like William Morris 
or MCA and get them to put together 
a program package. It can save us 
time and money. Sure, I've heard 
people say that agencies are getting 
lazy when they accept a package from 
an agent, but those outside talent buy- 
ing don't appreciate the problems. 

"And another thing. Whether we 
like it or not, the American public 
likes big names and the place to get 
them is at William Morris or MCA. 
You can't avoid dealing with them." 

On one subject there was wide agree- 
ment among admen. Barring a de- 
pression, video was too dynamic, too 
exciting to be hurt by high talent costs. 
It was admitted there might be some 
temporary derangement caused bv 
costs going way out of line, but the 
iron law of economics, admen assured 
SPONSOR, is an automatic regulator of 
prices. Look at Hollywood, they said. 
It happened there. But so long as tv 
offers good entertainment to the public, 
nothing disastrous can happen. * * * 



B&M TV TEST 

i Continued from page 32 ' 

si-ting id cities w itb jobbers which are 
located within 50 miles of Green Ba\ : 
and \rea B, consisting of jobbing 
points 50 to LOO miles awaj from 
Green Bay. Area \. in oilier words, is 
the heart of \\ B \Y-TV's zone of influ- 
ence; Area B is the outer region. 
(These two designations should not be 
confused with the usual A and B con- 
tour terms in tv coverage. \ote, also, 
that sales are given lor individual cities 
within Areas A and B as well as for 
the whole area.) One of the interest- 
ing points the test max reveal is wheth- 
er Area B will get as big a sales lift 
from the tv campaign as Area A. 

SI 2.500 budget: B&M sales for the 
entire year of 1954 are estimated by 
the broker at only $37,000 in sales 
Area A, $17,000 in Area B (wholesale 
basis). Nonetheless, B&M's tv cam- 
paign will be as heavy as the average 
six-month effort on the station by na- 
tional advertisers. Budget for the cam- 
paign is SI 2.500. It is allocated 100% 
to WBAY-TV, a Channel 2 CBS TV 
affiliate (representative: Weed). The 
$12,500 is about 25' , of gross whole- 
sale sales for the entire previous year. 

The campaign will include six one- 
minute announcements weekly, three 
in Class "A" and three in Class "B" 
time. Total over six months: 156 an- 
nouncements. All announcements will 
be done live, many by the station's 
personalities. 

Copy furnished by BBDO will be 
adapted to suit the style of WBAY-TV 
personalities, although a careful check 
will be maintained to see that the basic 
copy platform is not violated. (Ex- 
amples of commercials used will be 
covered in a subsequent article of this 
series I . 

Success yardstick: sponsor asked 
B&M Ad Manager Northgraves what 
his yardstick for success of the cam- 
paign would be. In view of the propor- 
tionately heavy tv budget, would it be 
necessary for the profit from increased 
sales to equal the number of tv dol- 
lars? 

"No," was his answer, "that would 
be expecting too much." A substan- 
tial sales increase plus increased dis- 
tribution of the brown bread is the 
objective sought. No dollar bench- 
mark for success or failure has been 
set in advance of the test. 

If B&M deems the results strong 



enough, ii- firs! regulai teli am- 

paigning in other markets max follow. 
I In In m has used tv on rare occasions 
onl) and has never before conducted 
a l\ test — or any other media test. 

B&M's total ad budget for the year 
is estimated by sponsor at over $200,- 
000. The New England firm has used 
a variet) of media in recent vears, 
ranging from magazines to newspapers 
to store-distributed magazines. It is 
current!) using radio in 14 markets, 
not including Green Ba\. 

Marketing hackground: The B&M 

bean is the most expensive, ounce for 
ounce, sold in the Green Bay area. 
It's of the oven-baked New England 
variety. Most of the bean- it must 
compete against are the lower-cost, 
cooked - in - the - can brands. Heinz, 
Campbell's and several hundred other 
canners make the can-cooked beans. 
Only B&M and a few other New Eng- 
land firms specialize in the bean baked 
in a brick oven. 

While the molasses-rich oven bean 
is the big seller in New England, in 
most other areas it has only a small 
fraction of the market. Otto L. Kuehn's 
advertising manager. Marvin W. Bow- 
er, estimates that the cooked-in-the- 
can bean has 96 r f of the sales in the 
Green Bay region. It's believed that 
B&M sells at least 50% of the oven- 
baked beans in the area, which would 
give it 2% of the total bean market. 
Its chief competitor among oven-baked 
beans is Puritan, which sells at a low- 
er price than B&M in most cases. 

B&M beans have virtually complete 
distribution in the area and sales have 
been growing slowly. B&M brown 



'53 Retail Sales in the 
Wheeling - Steubenville 
Market were $331,732,- 
000. You cover this rich 
market best with — 




7 FEBRUARY 1955 



109 



bread, however, has poor distribution 
— under 50%. The company moved 
only 380 dozen cans of the bread in 
sales Area A during the first six 
months of 1954; only 130 dozen in 
sales Area B. It's believed few people 
in the region relate the two products, 
whereas brown bread and beans are 
a favorite combination in New Eng- 
land. One of the objectives of the cam- 
paign, therefore, will be to establish 
the brown bread and beans as items to 
be eaten together. 

"Our problem," says Ad Manager 
Northgraves," is to change the basic 
eating habits of the population. Sell- 
ing oven-baked beans to people of this 
area is a little bit like coming into 
Maine to sell chile con-carne when the 
people here aren't accustomed to any- 
thing hotter than a fish chowder." 

The Green Bay test has considerable 
significance for B&M because it has 
many markets where sales are at a low 
volume relative to its best markets. 
\\ hilr it is a nationally distributed 
brand, about 60% of its brokers do 
90% of the business. The South, for 
example, is a particularly poor area 
for the Yankee oven-baked bean. B&M 
sells through 87 brokers in key cities 

rs mm m 

.> MA' Ki c 

im 




Radio Station W J P S is THE sports sta- 
tion in the Evansville, Indiana market. If 
you want to reach MEN, check our avail- 
abilities around our live play-by-play 
sports . . . the year around. 

• LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBAU . 

• EVANSVILLE COLLEGE FOOTBALL 
it BIG TEN FOOTBAU 

• LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL 

• EVANSVILLE COLLEGE BASKETBALL 
if INDIANA UNIVERSITY BASKETBALL 

• INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL TOURNAMENT 

• NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

• EVANSVILLE BRAVES BASEBALL 

• 500 MILE INDIANAPOLIS SPEEDWAY RACE 

• OTHER SPORTING EVENTS AS THEY OCCUR 

Sports mean LISTENERS. Listeners mean 
RESULTS. Let us prove our worth to you. 



Robert J. Mcintosh, General Manager 

■ EPIESiNIID tT 

The George P. Hollingbery Company 




<ZJ 



A RADIO IN EVERY ROOM" 

Evansville, Indiana 



and Otto L. Kuehn, operating out of 
Milwaukee, covers the entire test area. 

The Kuehn company acts as B&M's 
exclusive sales agent, selling the prod- 
uct through jobbers and through chain 
outlets. It's hoped that one effect 
of the television campaign will be to 
stimulate interest in B&M among groc- 
ery jobbers, chain stores and indepen- 
dent retailers. Otto L. Kuehn repre- 
sentatives started talking up the six- 
month test early in January and 
WBAY-TV organized a dinner for the 
wholesale grocery trade in the area to 
explain what was coming. That was 
back on 10 January. 

Shortly thereafter, B&M streamers 
appeared on the windows of Red Owl 
stores in the area, indicating the ad- 
vance publicity was beginning to take 
effect. 

Otto L. Kuehn representatives have 
urged their clientele to stock up more 
heavily than usual in anticipation of 
demand. Extra supplies of the B&M 
products are available in the area on 
short notice in case of need. The in- 
evitable question arising in the first 
weeks of the test: "Is it advance or- 
dering by grocers that accounts for 
sales increases or demand at the re- 
tail level?" 

The answer won't be known quickly 
since sales figures can be compiled ac- 
curately only at the broker level. But 
it's axiomatic that if tv-induced retail 
demand does not show up, reorders 
later in the test will tell the story. 

After grocers get more B&M on their 
shelves, will they push the brand hard- 
er with the housewife? It's agreed 
this is possible, tending to raise the 
question of whether it's the tv adver- 
tising that sells the product or the ex- 



tra stocking as a result of the tv cam- 
paign. 

This, however, is a perennial 
chicken-and-egg question in any prac- 
tical test and in the last analysis the 
advertiser is not concerned with the 
exact mechanism of the sale. The 
cash register results are the index of 
success. 

Retail price of the B&M products 
varies with individual grocers. The 
27-ounce size costs 29£ to 33£ per pot. 
Sales figures reported to sponsor will 
be broken down to cover wholesale 
movement of both 18-ounce and 27- 
ounce sizes. It will be possible to see, 
therefore, whether television stimulates 
trial purchases in the small or the larg- 
er size. (Brown bread has only one 
size.) 

Previous advertising: SPONSOR 
asked Otto L. Kuehn's ad manager, 
Marvin Bower, to comment on the 
amount of advertising for bean prod- 
ucts in the area today. His reply: "To 
the best of our knowledge competing 
brands of oven-baked beans and brown 
bread do no national advertising in the 
Green Bay area. The only medium em- 
ployed by B&M as well as our com- 
petitor, Puritan, is to make available 
co-operative advertising funds to the 
chain stores and voluntary groups 
based on their own purchases. 

"In the case of Burnham & Morrill, 
they allow the buyer at the wholesale 
level 2% of their purchases for co- 
operative advertising. This allows the 
chain or the wholesale house that spon- 
sors a group of stores to insert copy 
for B&M in their weekly newspaper 
ads up to the amount of money that 
accrues based on their purchases . . . 
no oven-baked beans are promoted ag- 



63% LOCAL LISTENERSHIP 



A recent survey* shows 63% listenership to local radio stations in 
the Atlantic City-County area, the heart of the $325,300,000 South 
Jersey shore market. And WOND is rated the top station by farl 

•1954 Survey by Advertest Research Available on Request 



Gel (he WONDerful 
Srory Today! Market 
Data, Station Cover- 
age and Programming 
Information on Req uesf 



WOND 



SOUTH JERSEY SHORE KEY 



Owned and Operattd by 

PIONEER BROADCASTERS, INC. 
Pleasantville*, New Jersey 

N. Y. Office: 550 Fifth Ave. COIumbus 5-1430 




1400 KC 
FULL TIME 



110 



SPONSOR 



gressively here." 

If past advertising has been almost 
non-existent, what is the possibility 
that competing brands will rush into 
the area with counter-campaigns de- 
signed to confuse results of the B&M 
test; or designed to hold onto their 
own share of the market? 

The question arises because test 
campaigns are traditionally subject to 
counter-blasts from competition, once 
they are discovered. It's believed this 
problem will not occur in the present 
test campaign. Reasons: (1) There is 
no past history of aggressive advertis- 
ing by other bean companies in the 
area, as noted. (2) The B&M budget 
for the test is proportionately too high 
to encourage counter-campaigning just 
for the purpose of confusing results. 

The previous test: Results on the 
previous WBAY-TV test, designed to 
determine how far out a television sta- 
tion can exert sales pull, have been 
compiled by the University of Wiscon- 
sin. A new product, previously un- 
advertised in the region, was the 
guinea pig. University of Wisconsin 
researchers used 11 cities distributed 
at varying distances from Green Bay 
as their check points. It was found 
that to the north where WBAY-TV 
had no tv competition during the test 
period (15 February through 15 July 
1954) sales effectiveness extended out 
to the fringes of signal coverage. 

These are some highlight conclu- 
sions from the University of Wiscon- 
sin report on the WBAY-TV study: 

• "The fact of area coverage by a 
station reaching away from major 
competition is clearly established. One 
might say that a 100 kw station with 
an 800 ft. antenna can cover a radius 
of 60 miles away from competition 
over average terrain as effectively as 
its home city. Beyond that distance a 
station's effectiveness gradually de- 
clines but it can be 75% as effective 
90 miles away as it is in its own mar- 
ket. 

• "Station and program listening 
are a good rough index of sales ef- 
fectiveness. In fact, under certain lim- 
ited conditions, tv station mail has a 
degree of validity as an index of sales 
effectiveness." 

(Copies of the University of Wis- 
consin study, giving full details in re- 
sults of the sales test plus telephone 
coincidental and mail ballot research, 
are available from WBAY-TV, Green 
Bay, Wisconsin. Address requests to 
Haydn Evans.) -k -k -k 



4 A's REACTIONS 

(Continued from page 40) 

". . . It isn't reasonable to expect an over- 
night reversal of a trend which has gath- 
ered such momentum, but an agreement 
among so large and influential a segment 
of the agency field cannot help but aid sta- 
tions and networks in an effort to hold to 
the letter of rate cards and policies in all 
the areas under discussion. . . ." John H. 
Bachem, Gen. Mgr. Du Mont Tv ISet. 

"These problems are best handled by in- 
dustry associations, rather than by individual 
reps, who alone cannot establish rate prac- 
tices. The SRA Rate Committee is working 
on it. If all the reps can be gotten to think 
along the same line, then something might 
be done. The 4 A agencies are usually rea- 
sonable. But when some agencies get away 
from the straight and narrow, others want 
the same special deal. Something like these 
recommendations is needed from time to 
time as a reminder that we take stock." 
Adam J. Young, Jr., Pres. Adam J. 
Young, Jr., Inc. and Pres. SRA. 

". . . Adherence to these rules should be 
easy for the great majority of advertisers, 
their agencies and for broadcasters. As is 
to be expected, I am most interested in the 
section on rates. I am encouraged to see this 
stand against secret practices but I feel that 
on this point the Association might have 
been more positive in its approach. Here 
the burden of proof performance lies with 
the broadcaster. I think that a few agen- 
cies often not only encourage but foster 
undesirable rate practices. . . ." Roger 
W. Clipp, Gen. Mgr. WFIL, Philadelphia 

"While most agencies want to conduct their 
business decently, there are some which are 
naturally chiselers, and others which try 
hard to squeeze every bit of juice out of 
the lemon for their clients. On the whole, 
the recommendations should have a bene- 
ficial effect. Weak stations, especially, can 
find them helpful. For they can cite the 
4 A code in discussions with agencies and 
advertisers .that .seek to depart from good 
practices." John E. Harrington, Part- 
ner, Harrington, Righter & Parsons. 

"The 4 A statement is a most laudatory 
document. The SRA Rate Committee feels, 
however, that the most significant problem 
has been completely overlooked — that of the 
national advertiser who attempts to buy 
radio time at local rates. There can be no 
criticism of either advertiser or agency for 
trying to get the best possible value. It is 
rather a question of using dollars to pres- 
sure stations into quoting improper prices. 
The only ultimate solution is for the 4 A's 
to take a stand against attempts of na- 
tional advertisers to get local rates. And it 
is basically up to the stations to eliminate 
the multiple rate system. Everyone suffers 
from this evil: The station's product is 
cheapened, and the agency endangers its 
control of accounts and commissions." 
Robert Eastman, Exec. V.P. John Blair 
& Co. & Chrmn. SRA Rate Committee. 



". . . It is almost universally testified to 
by agency people that merchandising aid by 
stations rarely enters into decisions on sta- 
tinn buying. It is only after the purchase 
that merchandising help is inquired into 
and sought. Furthermore, it is widely known 
that with all media, merchandising is longer 
on promise than it is on performance. . . . 
Many large advertisers look askance at mon- 
ey spent by stations on merchandising, with 
the feeling that the station's object should 
be to provide audience, not products. . . . 
The wide dissemination and universal ap- 
proval of the 4 A statement is bound to 
correct the operations that now represent 
something less than good media practice. . . . 
Now that the 4 A's has dealt with these 
touchy subjects . . . can they promulgate 
the truth on identical local and national 
rates? Where the local rate is lower, the 
agencies are in some cases subjected to an- 
noying arguments and work. The stations 
having the same national and local rates win 
agencies' applause. And cooperative adver- 
tising, with its widely known weak morals, 
might be dealt with in the same forthright 
manner." T. F. Flanagan, Mg. Dir. SRA. 

"The recommendations serve the excellent 
purpose of setting up standards. We do not 
object, of course, to the usual request for 
normal merchandising support, but some 
requests are far out of line. I intend to 
read the document to our men at our regu- 
lar weekly meeting. Each of our 26 sales- 
men should be supplied with a set of the 
recommendations for use at agencies. They 
may help in cases where agency requests are 
unreasonable. Agencies that further the 
trend toward the use of co-op advertising, 
so that the client can benefit from getting 
the local rate, might keep in mind that that 
co-op money comes, by and large, out of 
national spot. In the long run the agencies 
are hurting themselves." Frank W. Mil- 
ler, Sr. Chrmn. of Bd. Headier-Reed Co. 

"All rates should be published. There is 
nothing wrong with merchandising, which 
can be of help in obtaining business. It is 



Latest Telepulse indicates 
63.5% of the Viewers in 
the Wheeling-Steuben- 
ville Market between noon 
and midnight prefer 
WTRF-TV. You get 3 
times the audience for 
the price of 1 on — 




«EPitestN teo ir 
HOLLINGBERY 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



111 



She speaks Spanish- 
reads Spanish- 
listens to Spanish radio- 
but, BUYS AMERICAN! 




She S one of over 900,000 
Spanish-speaking Mexican- 
Americans in the Texas Spanish 
Language Network coverage 
area. These Mexican-Americans 
have been buying American 
products, with emphasis on 
products that are brought to 
their attention through Spanish 
Language radio. 



TEXAS SPANISH 
LANGUAGE NETWORK 

KIWW XE0-XE0R XEJ 

intonio Rio Grandt El. Paso 

\ '<///. y 
Represented nationally by 

NATIONAL TIMES SALES 
N< w ) "i I. ' ( 'hicago 

HARLAN G. 0AKES & ASSOC. 
/." Angeles • San Francisco 



Ktra effort and expense sometimes de- 
manded that is the difficulty, for the sta- 
tion cannot possibly do the same kind of 
job for all advertisers. I am happy to say 
that we have little pressure exerted by agen- 
cies. Occasionally there is an effort to get 
local rales for national accounts. The trend 
toward the single rate is a hopeful sign for 
an ultimate solution of this problem." Rus- 
si'l Walker, f .1'. John !■'. Pearson Co. 

*'. . . I feel that the means and language 
which this Committee has used to present 
this problem may not remedy the situation 
it has pointed out as much as it would tend 
to cause an acceleration of the very forces 
and tarior- ii i- ostensibly trying to curb. 
I feel that the statement on rates was some- 
what incomplete and that it did not propose 
a conclusive remedy. On the one hand the 
agencies are encouraged to seek the lowest 
rate available for any class of advertising 
without any regard for the possible value 
delivered in exchange for those rates, while 
on the other hand the Committee has simply 
sought to legitimatize rate deals by insisting 
that they be published. . . . The rate para- 
graph has implicitly put advertisers on no- 
tice that lower rates are obtainable . . . 
from the majority of broadcasters. Thus, the 
major effect of the rate paragraph becomes 
one of branding broadcasting as the medium 
which is selling itself on the single standard 
of price. This sil nation has been aided and 
abetted on the agency-advertiser level. . . . 
It is my belief that the solution of this prob- 
lem will not come as a result of two simple 
statements regarding rates in the \ \ \ \ re- 
port, purporting to wish that the situation 
would go away. . . . The Phil. R&TvB Assoc, 
has studied the question. Our belief is that 
' \ll efforts at a solution of the rate prob- 
lem must be based on confidence and faith 
in the medium and in each othei based on 
the knowledge ol what we have in the way 
of a product. 1 We have a good product to 
sell — we do not have to use the deal' to re- 
place program development, efficient manage- 
ment, promotion and salesmanship." Win. 
II. Caskey, V.P.. Gen. Mgr. WPEN, Phila. 

". . . In today's situation, we believe that 
the agencies have a responsibility not to en- 
courage stations to sell off rate, nor to play 
one station against another in an effort to 
I -peeial rale concessions. These impor- 
tant matters weri' left out of the rate section 
of tin \ \ \ \ ri lease, and should be defined 
in the same mannei as wen thi specific ob- 
i. . tions to cm rent practices in merchandis 
ing and publicity. We further suggest thai 
ihe \ \ \ \ establish a committee on ethics 
which would release to all members evnii 
pie- of agencies who deliberately practici 
rati Cutting, in-i-t upon use of copy in I i 

taste, and make excessive demand- for free 
-iimcc from station-. It agencies indulging 
in -in h unethical pi actices ai e held op to 
the light of industry scorn, such practices 
will become less prevalent." Bill Waffle* 
fvrt. sV.s. Mtir. lulu. Petry. • • • 



SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continual from page 89) 

ply good programing without commer- 
cials. But can this box office offer en- 
tertainment good enough to lure view- 
ers away from the free program on 
another channel? Can this box office 
in the home take the place of going 
to the neighborhood theater or local 
sports e\ent and lea\ ing home prob- 
lems behind? 

What entertainment can subscription 
t\ offei thai sponsors cant? \\ hen the 
viewer is at the point of deciding 
whether he is going to pay $1.00 to 
see Subscription Movie X or see spon- 
sored Show Y on another channel for 
free, then the entertainment values 
come into play. If fee tv presents 
Moby Dick for S1.25, the sponsor may 
sas. "O.K. We'll give them Gone With 
the Wind free of charge." 

Subscription tv. in order to go over, 
will have to offer top entertainment 
to viewers. But will it be able to 
compete with what the audience has 
been getting free of charge? 

\\ hen they must pay for some of 
their entertainment, there is the happy 
possibility that home viewers may "re- 
discover" commercials, regard them 
with new appreciation as the means of 
receiving free entertainment. 

Kven if subscription tv should suc- 
ceed and grow so big that it does away 
with commercialh sponsored video, 
you still cant lose the sponsor because 
the sponsor will find some ua\ to com- 
pete and present better spectacles. 

In any event, if fee tv does go over 
with a bang, you can rest assured that 
it will be one of the biggest operations 
in the world because everj ad agency 
man will be in it — with a box-top deal. 




KRIZ Phoenix advertised these dresses as 
cut to almost nothing." 



112 



SPONSOR 





s 






Kaymond Nelson is closing his own adver- 
tising agency to join Television Bureau of Advertis- 
ing as miliaria! spat saJes director. He's second recent 
appointment to TvB staff, follows by a fortnight 

naming of Dr. Leon Arons as research director. 

\ elson is broadcast media veteran, was one time 
production manager at NBC, supervisor of tv 
at Mutual in tv's infancy, produced and sold first 
half-hour tv show (Tintex Show) to be sponsored. 
In 1«JI1 he built, sold first "spectacular" — Du 

]lont's Boys from Boise (two hours long.) 



Maurice If. Needham is one of country's 

jew agency executives to give employees and public 
complete financial details of his operation. At 
annual meeting of Needham, Louis & Broby Inc. 
employees, he said agency's billing for year ending 
\ member 1954 was $28,933,000, an increase of 
$1.1 million over 1953. Net profit, he disclosed, was 
$303,400 compared with $221,600 year before. New 
figure represents about 1% of gross billings. Agency 
is entirely owned by 170 employee-stockholders. 
Agency's 1954 radio-tv billing: About $12 million. 



John B. Poor, v.p. & general counsel of Gen- 
eral Teleradio Inc., is newly elected executive vice 
president of MBS. Poor will retain vice presi- 
dent i of General Teleradio in his new post, which 
will be "the administration of Mutual network 
activities," according to Thomas F. O'Neil, president. 
lie's expected to become acting head of network 
when O'Neil is not in New York. Poor joined Gen- 
eral Teleradio in 1952 following an association with 
the law firm of Dal ton & Poor, Boston. He's a 
Harvard man, is married and has five children. 



Iltilli) .Sc/i(ic/llc. senior vice president of 
Bryan Houston Inc. and member of SPONSOR'S All 
\ledia Advisory Board, has received a citation from 
the Advertising Research Foundation for "outstand- 
ing leadership of and distinguished service to" 
ARF. Schachte has been ARF board member 
since January 1952, served as chairman during 1953. 
He continues to serve as an ARF director. The 
citation was presented to Schachte by Edgar 
Kobak, ARF president, on behalf of the organiza- 
tion's board o\ dire: tors. 




When that 1 buy is WJAC-TV, Johns- 
town, you not only steer your way into 
the rich Johnstown area, but you 
coast right into the Pittsburgh and 
Altoona markets, as well! 
Latest Hoopers show WJAC-TV: 
FIRST in Johnstown 

(a 2-Station market) 
SECOND in Pittsburgh 

(a 3-station market) 
FIRST in Altoona 

(a 2-Station market) 
Smooth the way for more sales with 
the 1 buy that covers 3 . . . 




Ci t full details from your KATZ man! 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



113 



National products get best results 




CASH REGISTERS RING RESULTS 
Product labels mailed in by housewives playing for cash prizes, play 
a merry tune of profitable advertising wherever kash box has been 
used. 

• NATIONAL PRODUCTS USING KASH BOX 
on KGA immediately following highest rated Don 
McNeil's Breakfast Club . . . will force sales 
throughout the hard to sell Inland Empire by 
using radio time, plus free newspaper tie-ins and 
display space in 68 IGA Super Markets. Your 
products are bound to move. 

• BONUS IMPACT... KGA's 50,000 
WATTS. The only 50 kilowatt radio 
in the nations fastest growing mar- 
ket . . . commands listeners every- 
where . . . gives buyers the lowest 
cost-per-thousand. 



Represented by: 

Venard, Rintoul 

and McConncll 

Chicago - New York - San 

Francisco - Los Angeles 



114 



KGA 




ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



Affiliate 



\HC Film 


61, 63. 6J 


\u.ird Television . 




;>i 


Bro idi .i-i Music, Vac. 

Caravel lilm 




60 
11 


( iareer 




106 






71 






61 


1 ree X Peters 


90. 


Georgia Trio 
( riiild I ilms 




93 

3 


Kling Film 




62 


Don Lee 




83 

27 


\1'.\ irhlll 




14 


NBC TV 


24, ^"». 6( 

1 


'., 67 




\ t 45 


Precision Film 




71 


Pulse 




78 


Schwimmer 

Screen Gem- 


k5, 52, 53 

6. 7 

84, 85 


Texas Spanish Languag 
Television Programs of 
\\ . stinghouse 


e Net. .. 112 
America 12, 13 

72, 73 
56. 57 


1 M W 




97 


k \KK-TY 




115 


K \ 1 \ 




77 


KBIC 


16 


KFYI) 
KFMB 




99 
9 


kn i; 




98 


KGA 




114 


kHOI 1 \ 




99 


ki\(. 




68 


KMRC 




102 


k MI-TV 




103 


k\l / 




69 


KO.ME 


106 


kOW 1 




in? 


KPQ 


8 


KPRl l\ 

KRIZ 

KSBW-TV 


Rack Cover 

mi 112 

28 


KSOO 




9? 


kWKH 




5 


k \\ k w 




mi 


KXI.Y T\ 




W8 


^ \ 




10 


WP.U 
\\ BT 

WCBS-TY 
Will 
WDAY-T\ 


Front Cover 
30 

18. i<; 

89 
87 


WDS1 

WIMP 




105 
?6 


WERD 




<)-, 


\\ 1 \ \ 




17 


Will 1 




'»7 


WINS . 




in 


WIOD 




89 


WITH 
\\ 1 \( l\ 
W II1P-TY 




1 F( 

II.; 
86 


W.I PS 
W KZO-TV 




mi 

"0 


W Ml W 




64 


W \ \\ 
WOND 
w PTZ 




[BC 

no 


W RBI T\ 




(,: 


\\ Rl \ 




?9 


\\ RGB 




VI 


WSJS 

\\ ■-( >k 




'11 

99 


WTIHTN 
WTRF l\ 




62 

107 


WTXL 




15 


W W()KT\ 




63 




SPONSOR 




...it 9 s the 



KARK pulls 18 "firsts" among 24 morning quarter hours — 

3 times as many as all other Little Rock stations combined! 

— as reported by the March 1954 PULSE Area Study 



Your sales pitch, no matter how persuading, can't convince 
anybody who doesn't hear it. So why blow your budget 
on bigger signals that reach more dead sets? The station 
that pulls the biggest bonafide audience in the Little Rock 
market, the station actually listened to most, is KARK. The 
proof of the pulling is in the rating. And PULSE rates KARK 



tops — morning, afternoon and evening — 66 quarter hour 
"firsts" out of 72. 

Why such popularity? For one thing, KARK is a habit— and 
a good one— with Little Rock listeners. Dials have been fixed 
on 920 since 1948. Furthermore KARK programming includes 
the best of NBC. 



It's program popularity and proved listenership like this, rather than power alone, that attracts customers 
for you ... or to put it another way, it's not the reach— it's the PULL ! 

Advertise where people listen most, where the cost is low— on KARK! 




MAN TODAY *%?zzrzr* 



7 FEBRUARY 1955 



15 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



TvB progress 

I he I Vlc\ ision Bureau of \d\ei tis- 
ing is making tracks — fasl. It has al- 
readv launched important research 
projects which the advertiser and 
agency will receive eagerl) once the\ 
arc oil' the statistical griddle. 

As an example of things to come, 
the TvB has signed with \. C. Nielsen 
for a stnd\ of television viewing in 
homes which own washing machines. 
The objective: to show whv manufac- 
1 1 j i < ■ i - of sudsless detergents for wash- 
ing machines cant afford to stay out 
of tv. Newspapers toda) get the big- 
gesl gob ol sudsless business, a situa- 
tion I v I! is determined to change. 

I\l! has won wide support among 
broadcasters i latest count at press- 
lime: 70-plus stations and first-year 
budget of ovei 1400,000). CBS is the 
In -I network to join. And John Blair 
& Co. recentl) became the first rep- 
resentative member. 

The John Blair decision to support 
TvB has considerable significance in 
light nl the initial desire of many reps 
for a promotion bureau geared 100%' 
to sell spot. TvB has been organized 
In . i\r cadi of the three branches of 
I In medium spot, network and local 



it> nun sale- force. This lias mi- 
doubtedl) reassured Blair that its niein- 
bership due- will provide direct sup- 
port lui expansion of >p«>t business. 
It - in be Imped other rep-, other net- 
works, and film syndicators as well, 
will become members. SPONSOR, which 
advocated establishment "f a tv pro- 
motion bureau as far back as Februar) 
1953, feels that the advertiser as well 
as the industry will gain from solid 
growth of TvB. 



Let's get basic 

I he major printed media l news- 
papers, magazines, billboards and car- 
cards I have lived and prospered 1>\ 
their circulation statistics. Over the 
years this has simplified existence for 
agency media men. who could start 
with a basis of gi\en circulation and 
go on from there. 

Not so with radio and television. 
Long ago the air media unwittingly 
made basic such complexities as "seis- 
in-use" and "share-of-audience." While 
the value of this research data is un- 
deniable as a starling point in evalu- 
ating radio and television's place in 
advertising appropriations, it leave- 
much to be desired. 

In 1').").") radio and television broad- 
casters will do well to concentrate on 
the task of making circulation basic. 

B\ circulation yve mean the number 
of sets in workable order within the 
individual listening or viewer area, 
their disposition in the home and other- 
factors that are roughl) comparable I" 
the circulation information <m which 
the Chicago Tribune or the New Vuk 
Daily News thrive. We'd also like to 
make basic such national radio intelli- 
gence as the average nunibcr-of-hours- 
of-radio-listening in all radio homes, in 
tv homes, in automobiles — broken 
down by some three or four periods 
during the day. 



II radio and television sources will 
agree to foster and -tick bv some >im- 
ple vet logical yardsticks i we suggest. 
in addition to the aforementioned, a 
coverage map made bv each station in 
conformitj with standard specifica- 
tions), we believe that media direc- 
tors, ad managers, account men and 
time buyers will express their grati- 
tude in tangible fashion. 

The \ MM B i- on the right track 
with its in-the-works tv set count. This 
count can't come too soon, for toda) 
there are no less than three conflicting 
trade paper tallies of an unofficial na- 
ture augmented bv manv compiled bv 
large advertising agencies from out- 

daleil estimates. I bis i ban- i- l\ pica! 
in the histinv oi radio and tv. but can 
be remedied bv an official industry 
count that advertisers and agencies will 

welcome. 

* » * 

Toast to radio 

Lincoln-Mercury, Kenyon & Eck- 
hardl and Ed Sullivan performed a 
service to radio in presenting their 
"Cavalcade of Radio" on a recent 
7*005/ of the Town telecast. Thev not 
only dramatized the medium's history 
before a nationwide CBS T\ audience: 
the) also served to remind advertisers 
and agencies of the dynamic values in- 
herent in the aural medium which arc 
too often overlooked today. 

Essentially the I'd Sullivan show 
took a backward look at radio from 
the 1920's through the mid-1930's. 
Now : we'd like to see someone drama- 
tize radio as it is today. Radio is so 
natural a part of living, it tends to be 
taken for granted. But tangible bene- 
fits in building strongei listening hab- 
its, greater excitement values, can ac- 
crue for the industrj if it merchan- 
dises itself to the public more consis- 
tently. We saj take a <nv from Holly- 
wood w hii b has leai ned to use l\ pro- 
motion — and radio too increasingly. 



Applause 



Keeper of the Code 

Ever) industry ha- il- stalwarts 

those lew unpaid indust rv -minded men 

who pave the wa) and do the rough 
chores so all ma) benefit. 

I In- radio and lelev i-inn In <>ad< a-l 

i 1 3, more than most, have needed un- 
selfish service. The name- ill those 
who provide il are well-known and 
none with greatei respeel and affection 



than John E. Fetzer. outgoing Chair- 
man of the Tv Code Review Board. 

A big. quiet, self-effacing man. John 
I elzer makes himself heard onlv when 
there is a problem that calls for a 
prompl constructive action. Then he's 
heard from plent) . 

\i the recent meeting ol the N \KTB 
Board the t\ Directors gave him a 
handsomely-bound cop) of the t\ 



Code containing this inscription: 
"To John I.. Fetzer who served as 

( bail man of the lelev i ion ( 'ode l!e- 
view Board from 1952 to 1956 in rec- 
ognition of selfless service to the na- 
tions lelev ision broadcasters and to 

the audience ihev serve. 

John Fetzei s a< i eptance was short 
and typical. '"Let's call this an award 
not to a man. bill to an ideal. 



116 



SPONSOR 




BROAD COVERAGE 



in the land where radio reigns 

Taking the measure of big Aggie is a 
man-sized job. It's a big figure to 
work with. For Big Aggie Land is 
a land of 190 counties in parts of 
5 states in the great Upper 
Missouri Valley — Minnesota, the 
Dakotas, Nebraska and Iowa. 

WNAX-570 strides the length ond 
breadth of Big Aggie Land. Plays 
a far bigger role in the lives of 
the 670,000 families in this area 
than any other medium. (To most 
of these families TV simply 
means Taint-Visible.) 

Yes, this is the lond where radio 
reigns . . . morning, noon and night. 
And WNAX-570, the Big Aggie 
Station, is radio in prosperous 
Big Aggie Land. 

Whatever media you buy in other 
lands, there is only one low-cost, 
high-return way to sell the 670,000 
families in the great Upper 
Missouri Valley. WNAX-570. 




| BIG AGGIE LAND: 

| Where 80 f i of the homes 

I hear WNAX-570 from 3 to 7 

I times a week. 



I 




WNAX-570 

Yankton, South Dakota 

A Cowles station. Under the same manage- 
ment as KVTV Channel 9, Sioux City, Iowa. 
Don D. Sullivan, Advertising Director. 



Ask your Katz man. 



CdS Radio 



I 




First in Houston with TV Experience... Over 500 Man-Years 



The Golden Gulf Coast Market has been sold on KPRC-TV 

ever since it made Houston's first telecast in 1949. 

Today's excellence in market-wise programming, production, 

promotion, and engineering is the result of these years 

oi experience. KPRC-TV remains firsl in the eyes of Gulf Coast 

viewers . . . mornings . . . afternoons . . . evenings . . . 

all the time, and over 500 man-years oi experience is the 

priceless ingredient that makes it so. 




w 






Channel 2 Houston 

JACK HARRIS, 

Vice President and General Manager 

Nationally Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



FIRST 



I N 



T V 



EXPERIENCE 



WITH 



OVER 



5 



MAN-YEARS 



R0C aV 2 



P - 



*Z* 



magazine radio antltv advertisers use 



21 FEBRUARY 1955 



50* per copy« $ 8 per year 




1% of W-I-T-H's audience have incomes of $5,000 or more! 




RFCrvfo 



48% 




W-I-T-H's audience 

by income groups 

, Just about everybody in the business knows 
at WITH has the biggest listening audience 
Baltimore City and Baltimore County. They 

low, too, that WITH provides the lowest 

>st-per-thousand listeners of any station in 

>wn. 

But there's a lot of talk about the quality of 
lis audience. The A. C. Nielsen Company has 
;cently made a survey which shows the com- 
^sition of the listening audience for WITH and 
le other Baltimore station. The other station 

a powerful network outlet. 



Audience of 
Network Station A 

by income groups 

The upper group — families with incomes of 
$5,000 a year or more— make up 589? of the 
total WITH audience. Only 48% of the net- 
work's audience is in this group. In the middle 
group— incomes from 3 to 5 thousand dollars 
a year— WITH has 33%, the network 37%. 
In the lower group— under $3,000 a year— 
WITH has 9%, the network 15' , . 

So don't worry about "prestige" when you're 
buying radio time in Baltimore. WITH gives 
you all the "prestige" you need. Ask your 
Forjoe man! 



PL0TKIN MEMO: 
WHAT IT MEANS 

page 29 

Radio's morning 
draw the ladies 
to Slenderella 

page 32 

Are tv commercials 
getting 

talent-lazy? 

page 34 

TV TEST: 
REPORT 1 

Should national 
advertisers get 
local radio rates? 



page 36 



-in Baltimore 



WITH 




page 38 



Coca-Cola's 
new ad look 

page 40 



TOM TINSLEY, President 



REPRESENTED BY FORJOE & CO. 



F«"5 C n 

Should you redesign 
your package 
tor color tv? 

page 42 




ESSO STANDARD OIL COMPANY 
^Jraditionallu in the f ublic (^oniicit 



ence . . . 



Esso products are taken foi granted l>\ American motorists] 

It's the public's u.i\ ol expressing complete confidence in Esso service and products. In man] 

respects, this is a high form ol tribute |>aid to Esso's men ol science. Petroleum scientists 

and skilled laboratory technicians, assisted by the most modern scientific equipment, search oul 

the answers to problem-free motoring and improved cai performance. Havens & Martin 

Inc., Stations have their specialists, too. devoted to turning ideas into sales lor advertised 

on WMBG-WCOD-WTVR. Programming research and vigorous imagination, tested In audience 

reaction, have built up a large and responsive following throughout Virginia on Richmond's 

only complete broadcasting institution. WMBG-AM, WCOD-FM and WTVR-TV. 

Join with confidence the liist stations ol Virginia foi youi 

advertising needs in one ol the South's richest areas, 



PIONEER NBC OUTLETS FOR VIRGINIA'S FIRST MARKET 

WMBG am WCOD fm WTVRtv 

MAXIMUM POWER 100,000 WATTS • MAXIMUM HEIGHT 1049 FEET 

WTVR Represented Nationally !>> BLAIR TV, INC. 
WMIM, Represented Nationally b) THE ROLLING CO. 





Industry braced 
against Congress 



FCC to look 
at fee tv plans 



NARTB unit hits 
'bait' pitches 



Schweppes adds 
spot radio 



Vitapix signs 
WGN TV, others 



'Visual' item 
uses 95% radio 



Led by CBS president Frank Stanton, 27 CBS TV affiliates in 22 states 
last week promised fight to the finish on any Congressional move to 
adopt broadcasting recommendations submitted to Senate Commerce Com- 
mittee by Harold M. Plotkin, ex-committee counsel for Democrats. 
Affiliates said Plotkin proposals would jeopardize tv's "most popular 
live entertainment and public service programs. ..." Last Thursday 
Senate Commerce Committee's Republican counsel, former FCC commis- 
sioner Robert F. Jones, was to have turned in his report. (See story 
on Plotkin memo, page 29.) 

-SR- 
Even though FCC last week asked for comments on subscription televi- 
sion, that doesn't mean Commission will ever authorize any type of 
"toll tv" service. FCC asked for comments from anyone interested in 
subject, but first asked petitioners to explain why they believe FCC 
has legal authority to authorize and regulate subscription television. 
FCC turned down bids for case-to-case approval of fee tv systems. 
(SPONSOR asked various sources if there can be peaceful co-existence 
between subscription tv and commercial video; for reactions, see 
SPONSOR Asks, 7 February 1955, page 88.) 

-SR- 
NARTB's Standards of Practice Committee last week adopted resolution 
unanimously condemning "bait & switch" advertising "as an ugly prac- 
tice." Committee chairman is Walter Wagstaff, KIDO, Boise. 

SR- 
Over 25% of Schweppes budget now goes into spot radio. Campaign built 
around bearded Commander Whitehead has been translated successfully 
from print to radio. Here's pattern: Schweppes attracts attention 
with 2 or 3 large newspaper ads, follows with 3 or 4 weeks of radio 
at frequency of 50 to 100 announcements weekly. Radio tapers off 
during next 8 weeks to 20 or 30 weekly. Second radio barrage is 
usually 50% of intensity of first. Agency is Ogilvy, Benson & Mather. 

SR- 
Vitapix has completed Chicago affiliation agreement, elected 5 other 
outlets to membership. WGN-TV got membership for Chicago. Other new 
members: WXEL, Cleveland; WGBS-TV, Fort Lauderdale; WSPD-TV, Toledo 
(all 3 Storer stations); WGAL-TV, Lancaster; WMCT, Memphis. Vitapix 
membership now totals 57 — only 3 short of announced goal. Newest 
members of Board: George B. Storer Jr., Ed Hall, Clair McCollough. 

--SR- 
Glamorene is still "visual" product which likes radio (see article 
SPONSOR 15 November). In 1955 95% of firm's budget will be radio, 
including Godfrey morning show on CBS Radio and new spot radio cam- 
paign starting 21 February. Glamorene, a rug cleaner, will be sold 
via minute participations in women's shows on 200 stations. 



SPONSOR Volumi 9 v I. 21 Februarj L955 Pi n i blweeklj bj SPONSOR Publication! toe i 1110 Elm Avi Ball! ore 11. Md. ] I 

ion nil, , hi E 19th SI \' « Fork 17 *s .- yeai in i S 19 elsowhere. Knteted u second class mallei 29 Tan. 1949 il Baltlmi indei Act. of 3 II 






lti:i>OKT TO SPONSORS for 21 February 1955 



KBS stations get 
14.3 rating avg. 



'Entertainment': 
$30,000 weekly 



Hoag-Blair to 
rep KFEL-TV 



Video tape 
to be tested 



Related selling 
radio plan 



New England 
radio survey 



Guild buying 
W-B's shorts 



Average rating of 14.3 with 54% share of audience is what sponsors 
can expect Keystone Broadcasting System stations to deliver, based on 
survey made in small and medium-sized towns by large advertising 
agency for one of its clients. Agency hired research firm of Gould, 
Gleiss & Benn to make survey because national rating services didn't 
have large enough sample of KBS markets. In single-station markets 
(76% of 800-plus KBS outlets are only station in town), average rating 
was 19.1 with 68% share of audience. All survey stations were lo- 
cated within televi s ion area s. 

-SR- 

WABC-TV, New York, will spend more t han $30,000 weekl y for its new 
"Entertainment" show, to debut next week. Program will run 2 ! 2 hours 
daily, 5 days weekly, will feature Tom Poston, Bob Carroll, Marion 
Colby, 12-piece Ray McKinley Orchestra, others. Four advertisers 
have signed so far for participations in show, to be aired 12:30-3:00 
p.m. They include Wise Potato Chips, Simplicity Patterns, Brown & 
Williamson (Raleigh), Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee. 

-SR- 

Hoag-Blair Inc.'s representation of KFEL-TV, Denver, signed recently, 
marks modification of firm's 5-month-old policy of representing me- 
dium to small-sized stations. KFEL-TV had been repped by Blair Tv ; 
it's now planned Blair Tv will rep stations in top 24 markets. Hoag- 
Blair will concentrate on those in 25th to 100th m arkets (with from 
100,000 to 350,000 tv sets in market). 

-SR- 
Installation of video tape recording equipment for field testing is 
under way at NBC, N.Y. Dr. E. W. Engstrom, executive v. p. of research 
and engineering for RCA, told SPONSOR testing will probably be com- 
pleted by fall ; equipment may be ready for tv market early in 1956. 
First stage will be to equip West Coast studios for purpose of re- 
placing present kine system. Competitor Bing Crosby Enterprises, 
Inc., claims it is ahead of RCA in developmental work. 

-SR- 

NBC radio 0&0 stations are due to unveil this week "RISE" — Related 
Items Sales Effect — to advertisers. Two different but related adver- 
tisers (soup and crackers, for instance) each buy announcement 
schedule at regular card rates. But by "selling" both products in 
each commercial, advertisers get d ouble exposure. 

-SR- 

Determination of radio stations to sell hard in 1955 evinced by action 
of 23 radio stations represented by Kettell-Carter, Boston. Stations 
voted to name committee to study possibilities of New England-wide 
audience survey. SPONSOR'S All-Media Evaluation Study suggested idea 
for survey to stations. 

-SR- 

Between 175 and 200 Warner Bros, motion picture short subjects may be 
bought by Guild Films Inc., marking first time Warner Bros, has sold 
any of its theatrical product to television. Deal was to have been 
finalized last week, was made through William Morris Agency. 

(.Sponsor Itrpurts continues |*«fM* 127) 



SPONSOR 



bird's-eye views 



5,000,000,000 
prospect for you 



HARRISBURG W 





I j.gHlfF 

. a 1 n ", ■ ■ I 



mm ' 




LANCASTER 




Channel 8 -Mighty Market Place 



Harrisburg 

York 

Hanover 

Gettysburg 

Chambersburg 



Reading 
Lebanon 
Pottsville 
Hazleton 
Shamokin 



Waynesboro Mount Carmel 

Frederick Bloomsburg 

Westminster Lewisburg 

Carlisle Lewistown 

Sunbury Lock Haven 

Martinsburg Hagerstown 




316,000 
WATTS 





Thompson Products, I 




These five important metropolitan areas 
plus countless industrially rich cities and 
towns make this vast WGAL-TV market 
area a multi-billionaire prospect for your 
advertising dollar. Use WGAL-TV to reach 
three and a quarter million people with an 
effective buying income of $5 billion. 
Share in the almost $3 billion they spend 
for retail goods annually. 





YORK 




LEBANON 



*t*. Caterpillar Tractor^jShpajnp^ 





Representatives 

MEEKER TV, Inc. 



Chicago 
San Francisco 



advertisers use 




Volume 9 Number 4 
2i February 1955 



ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



The Plothin Memo 

Much talked of report to the Senate Commerce Committee proposes revolution 
in network operation, is the opening gun in what looks like radio-tv's year of 
probes. Here are the implications for admen lift 

Ratlio's mominy mcii it run- latlies to Slentlerella 

Fast-growing slenderizing chain was an ail-newspaper advertiser till it tested 
radio in October 1953. Now 50*7 of the budget goes to spot am. Male 
personalities on morning chatter and d.j. shows do the commercial honors 32 

Are tv commercials yettiny talent-lazy'.' 

The best comriercial message in the world can go down the drain if it's de- 
livered by the wrong announcer, warns BBDO v. p. Art Bellaire. This is the 
third and final article in his series on creative laziness •>-« 

BiWf fx'ffii results: sales rise us trade stocks 

First results of the tv test for B&M beans and brown bread show a sharp 
increase in sales of beans due to advance stocking by grocery trade; but 
brown bread moved ahead only slightly, needs consumer demand to force sales lid 

I <><•«/ rail ut rates: who should yet them? 

A growing number of national advertisers are seeking to get local rates in 
their spot radio campaigns; many argue that the nature of their business war- 
rants such rates. Many feel this is a trend which might undermine the effec- 
tiveness of radio advertising 3H 

Coke's new look 

Giant of the soft drink industry maintains $5,000,000 tv-radio budget, revamps 
long-standing copy approach to meet rising competition JO 

Should you redesign your paekaye for eolor tv? 

Will your package show up to good advantage on color tv? If not, should it 
be redesigned? The consensus of the experts is "No" if you are otherwise 
satisfied with it. Here are tips on achieving top impact in color 42 

\\ hat admen think of direet mail from stations 

Direct mail has high casualty rate, must be visually attractive, brief and 
newsworthy to compete for busy adman's attention 44 



COMING 



1955 si >nu.n SELLING SECTION 

In this, its seventh annual summer selling section, SPONSOR presents solid 
reasons why advertisers may find it advantageous to use the hot weather air, 
on both the network and local levels "4 )lftr. 

K&1I beans' tr test: Part III 

SPONSOR will continue to report the results of this single-market six-month 

tv test as they happen. Both bean and brown bread sales rose on first lap "J Jlar. 



AGENCY AD LIBS 

49TH & MADISON 

TIMEBUYERS 

NEW & RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Emanuel Kati 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 

SPONSOR ASKS 

TOP 20 TV FILM SHOWS 

P. S. 

AGENCY PROFILE, Myron L. Broun 

ROUND-UP 

TV RESULTS 

NEW TV STATIONS 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



II 



I 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Giene 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard F I 

Vice President: Jacob A. Evans 

Editorial Director: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Ch*rlo< Sinclair AltredJ.J: 

Associate Editor: Evelyn Konrad 

Department Editor: Lila Lee Seaton 

Assistant Editors: Keith Trantow, Al Zarrell i 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman. Joe G I 

Editorial Assistant: Florence Ettenberg 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: 1 e^'e Co'e 

Vice Pres.-Advg. Director: Robert P. Merdel 

Advertising Deportment: Edwin D. Coo | 

(Western Manager), Homer Griffith ISm 

west Manager), Arnold Alpert (Midwes* M 

ager), John A. Kovchok (Produc* 

agerj, Charles L. Nash 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Sarz (S 

scription Manager/, Emily Cutillo, M 

Kahn, Minerva Mitchell 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott 

Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 

Accounting Department: Eva M. Sanrl 

Laura Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Janet Whittier 



Published blueeklj lu SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS II, 

ni .1 wlih TV. Em Editorial Cln ulai n. | 

■ I ■ iii i: imii si i I9ih t U i » 

Noh \.nk 17. N 1 Tele n e Ml iraj Mill - I 

mil e mi K Orend \><- Phi m 
Dallas OfflYe: 27(ir. Carllale St. Phone: 1 
dulph 7381 i Ingclea Ofllci 60ST Suniel BouH 
Phone Bolbv S089 P: luting OIBm 8110 

Ivi Ballluioie II Md Subsi I Iptloiu 1 nlied Kt 

1 inada and Foreign $n Single 
Printed In l.S \ \ddieai all correipondenct l» 
K mill Si \>m Voik i; X Y Ml rrai Hill - I 
.1.1 1955, SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



^ M ^ 




-IRES UP FOR 



KTHS 

Ask Hoi, 



(LITTLE ROCK) 



TOO! 






lAfHEN you use 50,000- watt KTHS (Basic CBS) 
you reach a tremendous lot more than the 
Little Rock Trading Area. You also cover 
thousands of farms — hundreds of Arkansas 
towns and hamlets . . . 

Take Ash Flat (Ark.) for example. A. F.'s popula- 
tion is only 265 souls — but you'd have to 
multiply that nearly 12,800 times to visu- 
alize the interference-free daytime coverage 
of KTHS! 

When you use radio in Arkansas, really use it! The 
Branham Company has all the facts. 




AAO. 



OKU. 



KTHS 



50,000 Watts 
CBS Radio 



BROADCASTING FROM 

.ITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Represented by The Branham Co. 

Inder Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 




I S S I PPl 



LOUISIANA ,y